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A 11th Century Cult of St.Michael or Knights Templar, Curvilinear Copper Bronze Ring Engraved With the Archangel Michael

A 11th Century Cult of St.Michael or Knights Templar, Curvilinear Copper Bronze Ring Engraved With the Archangel Michael

From qpart three of our original ancient arrow heads, spears, lead sling bullets, antiquities and rings from an 1820 Grand Tour classical collection from Europe and the Middle East. As with all our items it comes complete with our certificate of authenticity. Engraved with the frontal image of the Archangel Michael St Michael the Archangel was – and still is – the most famous of all God’s angels. He was venerated as the commander of the angelic armies, a holy healer, a protector of high places and as a companion during our final journey between this world and the next. With so many talents, it’s easy to understand why Michael was among medieval Europe’s most popular and widely depicted saints. therefore, not surprisingly, he was taken as a special patron by Templar knights and crusaders and to him was attributed victory in several key battles, and revered by the Cult of St Michael, St. Michael was the symbol of the masculine early Middle Ages, years that found the West under constant attack, when great martial strength was necessary for survival, a period very different from the central Middle Ages symbolised by the Virgin Mary and her radiant Gothic cathedrals. Today historians continue to recognise the importance of this cult during so tumultuous a period in the history of Western Christendom. The Byzantine East from a very early time had emphasised the archangel's healing ability. In the West, however, it was his martial qualities that made him important. Protector of the Hebrews, as found in the Book of Daniel, he now became the guardian of the Christian people, master of the heavenly forces in his celestial habitat, which necessitated that his cult be practised on top of hills or mountains.
Pilgrims flocked to the saint’s shrine at Mount Gagano, many etching their name into the rock close to where St Michael was said to have appeared. Among those making the pious peregrination was a group of Norman knights. Their visit to the holy mountain in the early 11th century was the catalyst for a chain of events that resulted in the Norman conquest of Sicily.
Stones chipped from the site of Michael’s apparitions at Gargano were disseminated as sacred relics. Two found their way to Battle Abbey, William the Conqueror’s great penance for, and memorial to, his victory at the Battle of Hastings in 1066. The angel’s sacred military associations appealed to the warrior elites of medieval Europe. From the time of Charlemagne onwards, Michael was the official protector of the Holy Roman Empire and chivalric orders were founded under his patronage. As used in the early Crusades Period by Knights, such as the Knights of Malta [Knights Hospitaller], the Knights of Jerusalem the Knights Templar, the Knights of St John.The new Norman rulers were culturally and ethnically distinct from the old French aristocracy, most of whom traced their lineage to the Franks of the Carolingian dynasty from the days of Charlemagne in the 9th century. Most Norman knights remained poor and land-hungry, and by the time of the expedition and invasion of England in 1066, Normandy had been exporting fighting horsemen for more than a generation. Many Normans of Italy, France and England eventually served as avid Crusaders soldiers under the Italo-Norman prince Bohemund I of Antioch and the Anglo-Norman king Richard the Lion-Heart, one of the more famous and illustrious Kings of England. The ring is in superb condition and actually a good wearable size today.

Code: 23858

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SOLD. A Most Scarce German, Westphalian Infantry  'Extra Long' Mauser WW1 Regimental Issue Pattern 1898,

SOLD. A Most Scarce German, Westphalian Infantry 'Extra Long' Mauser WW1 Regimental Issue Pattern 1898, "Neuer Art" Sword Bayonet used From the Invasion of Belgium & France in August 1914

Made in 1902, by E.&F Horster. from the very first year of manufacture. Regimental markings for the 57.R.5.199 & 8.J.3.75. on the scabbard so it was used by the the the 57th Westphalian infantry Regiment. 5th Company. Bayonet number 199, then, by the 8th Jager Regiment. Company 3. Bayonet number 75

It was a German response to the long French 1886 Lebel bayonet. Manufactured from 1902 to about 1917. This is a most lengthy bayonet, and one of the earliest made with two grip slabs. It is most scarcely seen compared to the shorter, German WW1 so-called 'butcher' bayonet. Very nicely Imperial inspector marked, dated 1902. Used from then right through to the German surrender in 1918. Rarely seen and very desirable to collectors of good early German bayonets. For the German, close combat and trench warfare 'Shock Troop', this was a very sought after weapon in the his armoury. With it affixed to his Mauser Gew 98 rifle, he had a considerably longer reach than his British, French or Belgian counterpart, and standing in his trench, defending from attack from above, his reach was as long as a spear and deadly to an advancing Tommy.

57th (8th Westphalian) Infantry "Duke Ferdinand of Brunswick" part of VII Corps, that was assigned to the III Army Inspectorate which became the 2nd Army at the start of the First World War. The 2nd Army during World War I, fought on the Western Front and took part in the Schlieffen Plan offensive against France and Belgium in August 1914. Commanded by General Karl von Bülow, the 2nd Army's mission was to support the 1st Army's sweep around the left flank of the French Army and encircle Paris, bringing a rapid conclusion to the war. The 2nd Army laid siege to, and took the Belgian fortresses around Namur, and fought General Charles Lanrezac's French 5th Army at the Battle of Charleroi on 23–24 August 1914 and again at St. Quentin on 29–30 August 1914.

2nd Army bore the brunt of the Allied attack in the Battle of the Somme. It had grown to such an extent that a decision was made to split it into two still-powerful armies. Therefore, 1st Army was reformed on 19 July 1916 from the right (northern) wing of the 2nd Army. The former commander of 2nd Army, General der Infanterie Fritz von Below, took command of 1st Army and 2nd Army got a new commander General der Artillerie Max von Gallwitz. Von Gallwitz was also installed as commander of Heeresgruppe Gallwitz – Somme to co-ordinate the actions of both armies on the Somme Full length 26.5 inches. Blade 20.25 inches long. 6 inches longer than the German Butcher bayonet. Slight leather shrinkage to the scabbard length, however the leather itself is remarkably good and very sound. the blade is excellent. all the steel overall age russetting. Good and clear regimental stamps and imperial ordnance W stamp and date '02 to the blade back-edge at the forte. more photos of the blade to follow.

Code: 23878

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A Beautiful 1889 Pattern German Infantry Officer's Sword of The Great War. and Used into WW2 Until May 1945

A Beautiful 1889 Pattern German Infantry Officer's Sword of The Great War. and Used into WW2 Until May 1945

1889 Pattern Prussian Officers sword with cast Eagle guard, multi wire bound sharkskin grip, excellent condition double fullered blade and black lacquered steel combat scabbard. Most rare steel hilted example, as they were almost always made with brass hilts. Kaiser Willhelm Crest to grip. Folding eagle guard Used by a German infantry officer serving in the Great War. Many of these swords were also used in the 3rd Reich by veteran officers serving in WW2. Numerous Vintage photographs of WW2 German Officers show them wearing this pattern of sword, including one in the gallery of Generalleutnant Hans von Donat with his identical sword. This sword was taken at the official event of the German high command requesting surrender terms to Montgomery at 2nd army HQ on May 3rd, all of the participants were disarmed, unfortunately it is not known from whom this sword was taken. See our original official photograph from this special and monumentally important historical event, taken on the 3rd of May 1945. Is of Field Marshal Montgomery, Admiral von Friedeburg, General Kinzel and Rear Admiral Wagner [plus aides] .The unconditional surrender was not ‘officially signed until a few days later as Stalin insisted his generals must be present. Overall this sword is in excellent condition.
Field Marshal Montgomery greeted for the surrender the German delegation (Admiral von Friedeburg, General Kinzel and Rear Admiral Wagner).

Field Marshal Montgomery signed the terms of the surrender watched by Rear Admiral Wagner and Admiral von Friedeburg.
On 4 May 1945, at 18:30 British Double Summer Time, at Lüneburg Heath, south of Hamburg, Field Marshal Sir Bernard Law Montgomery accepted the unconditional surrender of the German forces in the Netherlands, northwest Germany including all islands, in Denmark and all naval ships in those areas. The surrender preceded the end of World War II in Europe and was signed in a carpeted tent at Montgomery's headquarters on the Timeloberg hill at Wendisch Evern. Lüneburg had been captured by the British forces on 18 April 1945 with Montgomery establishing his headquarters at a villa in the village of Häcklingen. A German delegation arrived at his tactical headquarters on the Timeloberg hill by car on 3 May, having been sent by Großadmiral Karl Dönitz who had been nominated President and Supreme Commander of the German armed forces by Adolf Hitler in his last will and testament on 29 April. Dönitz was aware of the allied occupation zones intended for Germany from a plan that had fallen into German hands. He therefore hoped that protracted partial and local surrender negotiations might buy time for troops and refugees in the east to seek refuge from the Red Army, whilst holding open a pocket to provide sanctuary on the west bank of the River Elbe.

Dönitz did not think it appropriate to negotiate personally with a field marshal as he had become the head of state following the death of Adolf Hitler. He therefore sent the delegation headed by the new Commander-in-Chief of the German navy Admiral Hans-Georg von Friedeburg. Montgomery refused an initial offer to surrender Army Group Vistula which was being cut off to the east by the Red Army and demanded the unconditional surrender of all forces on his northern and western flanks. The Germans stated that they did not have the authority to accept Montgomery's terms. However they agreed to return to their headquarters to obtain permission from Dönitz.

The German officers returned the next day at 18:00 with an additional delegate, (Colonel Fritz Poleck) representing the Oberkommando der Wehrmacht, (the German armed forces high command). Von Friedeburg was ushered into Montgomery's command caravan for confirmation that they were ready to sign. For the surrender ceremony Montgomery sat at the head of a table with an army blanket draped over it and two BBC microphones in front of him; he called on each delegate in turn to sign the instrument of surrender document at 18.30. The surrender ceremony was filmed by the British Pathé News and recorded for broadcast on radio by the BBC with a commentary by the Australian war correspondent Chester Wilmot. The intimate detail of document translation and conversation interpretation was supervised by one of Montgomery's senior intelligence officers Colonel James Oliver Ewart. Our original, and potentially uniquely surviving and for sale photo from this actual event, taken on the 3rd May, is for sale separately from the sword, we also have the sword's officer's knot for sale separately [see item code 23910].

Code: 23891

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A Near Mint Black and Silver German Officer's Sword Knot

A Near Mint Black and Silver German Officer's Sword Knot

This german senior officer's sword knot was surrendered, with its sword, to Field Marshal Montgomery's staff at the negotiation of the terms of surrender of the German Armed Forces on the 3rd of May 1945. The German delegation, headed by Admiral von Friedeburg, General Kinzel and Rear Admiral Wagner, on behalf of Gross Admiral Donitz at Montgomery's headquarters on the Timeloberg hill at Wendisch Evern. We have its sword, and an original official photo of the ceremony taken at the time, but they are all for sale separately [see our code item number 23891]. Unfortunately it is not known which general officer surrendered which sword and knot at the time as apparently no note was made [that has survived], as all of the delegation were voluntarily disarmed as a group prior to being in Montgomery's presence. The silver and black pattern was also most popular with the early SS as it portrayed their black and silver colours perfectly. It could perfectly compliment any original SS sword, either the pre 1936 type, or the regulation approved 1936 Polizei/SS pattern degan sword.

Code: 23910

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A Delightful & Beautiful Edo Period 1598-1863 Samurai War Arrow. A Tagari-Ya

A Delightful & Beautiful Edo Period 1598-1863 Samurai War Arrow. A Tagari-Ya

With original traditional raptorial feathers, probably the large edge-wing feathers of a Japanese sea eagle. The arrow tip is a traditional tamagahane steel hand made long arrow head, with folding and tempering exactly as would be a samurai sword blade, possibly signed on the tang under the binding but we would never remove it to see. The Togari-Ya or pointed arrowheads look like a small Yari (spear) and were used only for war and are armour piercing arrows . Despite being somewhat of a weapon that was 'fire and forget' it was created regardless of cost and time, like no other arrow ever was outside of Japan. For example, to create the arrow head alone, in the very same traditional way today, using tamahagane steel, folding and forging, water quench tempering, then followed by polishing, it would likely cost way in excess of a thousand pounds, that is if you could find a Japanese master sword smith today who would make one for you. Then would would need hafting, binding, and feathering, by a completely separate artisan, and finally, using eagle feathers as flights, would be very likely impossible. This is a simple example of how incredible value finest samurai weaponry can be, items that can be acquired from us that would cost many times the price of our original antiques in order to recreate today. Kyu Jutsu is the art of Japanese archery.The beginning of archery in Japan is pre-historical. The first images picturing the distinct Japanese asymmetrical longbow are from the Yayoi period (c. 500 BC – 300 AD).
The changing of society and the military class (samurai) taking power at the end of the first millennium created a requirement for education in archery. This led to the birth of the first kyujutsu ryūha (style), the Henmi-ryū, founded by Henmi Kiyomitsu in the 12th century. The Takeda-ryū and the mounted archery school Ogasawara-ryū were later founded by his descendants. The need for archers grew dramatically during the Genpei War (1180–1185) and as a result the founder of the Ogasawara-ryū (Ogasawara Nagakiyo), began teaching yabusame (mounted archery) In the twelfth and thirteenth century a bow was the primary weapon of a warrior on the battlefield. Bow on the battlefield stopped dominating only after the appearance of firearm.The beginning of archery in Japan is pre-historical. The first images picturing the distinct Japanese asymmetrical longbow are from the Yayoi period (c. 500 BC – 300 AD).
The changing of society and the military class (samurai) taking power at the end of the first millennium created a requirement for education in archery. This led to the birth of the first kyujutsu ryūha (style), the Henmi-ryū, founded by Henmi Kiyomitsu in the 12th century. The Takeda-ryū and the mounted archery school Ogasawara-ryū were later founded by his descendants. The need for archers grew dramatically during the Genpei War (1180–1185) and as a result the founder of the Ogasawara-ryū (Ogasawara Nagakiyo), began teaching yabusame (mounted archery) Warriors practiced several types of archery, according to changes in weaponry and the role of the military in different periods. Mounted archery, also known as military archery, was the most prized of warrior skills and was practiced consistently by professional soldiers from the outset in Japan. Different procedures were followed that distinguished archery intended as warrior training from contests or religious practices in which form and formality were of primary importance. Civil archery entailed shooting from a standing position, and emphasis was placed upon form rather than meeting a target accurately. By far the most common type of archery in Japan, civil or civilian archery contests did not provide sufficient preparation for battle, and remained largely ceremonial. By contrast, military training entailed mounted maneuvers in which infantry troops with bow and arrow supported equestrian archers. Mock battles were staged, sometimes as a show of force to dissuade enemy forces from attacking. While early medieval warfare often began with a formalized archery contest between commanders, deployment of firearms and the constant warfare of the 15th and 16th centuries ultimately led to the decline of archery in battle. In the Edo period archery was considered an art, and members of the warrior classes participated in archery contests that venerated this technique as the most favoured weapon of the samurai. The last photo in the gallery is not this arrowhead, but it shows how long the arrow head tang would be.

38 inches long

Code: 23916

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A Superb Imperial Roman Ring, Bearing Ancient Greek Inscription, Psixa Kali , Which Translates to 'Good Soul'

A Superb Imperial Roman Ring, Bearing Ancient Greek Inscription, Psixa Kali , Which Translates to 'Good Soul'

1st- 4th Century in copper bronze with superb natural age patination in excellent condition and great clarity to the hand inscription. In the classical world, the use of the Greek and Latin alphabets, derived originally from Phoenician characters, has been taken to be much more functional, and it is the reading of the surviving texts that has been regarded as all-important. There are many more extant examples of Roman inscriptions than earlier Greek and Hellenistic ones, but not all Roman inscriptions are in Latin. In fact, probably as many Roman inscriptions are in Greek as in Latin, for Greek was the common language in the eastern half of the empire.
The connection between the soul and characteristics like boldness and courage in battle is plainly an aspect of the noteworthy fifth century b.c. development whereby the soul comes to be thought of as the source or bearer of moral qualities such as, for instance, temperance and justice. In Pericles' funeral oration that Thucydides includes in his account of the Peloponnesian War, he says that those who know most clearly the sweet and the terrible, and yet do not as a result turn away from danger, are rightly judged “strongest with regard to soul”. This text, and others like it such as Herodotus, indicate a semantic extension whereby ‘soul’ comes to denote a person's moral character, often, but not always, with special regard to qualities such as endurance and courage.
The complete Roman Empire had around a 60 million population and a census more perfect than many parts of the world (to collect taxes, of course) but identification was still quite difficult and aggravated even more because there were a maximum of 17 men names and the women received the name of the family in feminine and a number (Prima for First, Secunda for Second…). A lot of people had the same exact name.
So the Roman proved the citizenship by inscribing themselves (or the slaves when they freed them) in the census, usually accompanied with two witnesses. Roman inscribed in the census were citizens and used an iron or bronze ring to prove it. With Augustus, those that could prove a wealth of more than 400,000 sesterces were part of a privileged class called Equites (knights) that came from the original nobles that could afford a horse. The Equites were middle-high class and wore a bronze or gold ring to prove it, with the famous Angusticlavia (a tunic with an expensive red-purple twin line). Senators (those with a wealth of more than 1,000,000 sesterces) also used the gold ring and the Laticlave, a broad band of purple in the tunic.

So the rings were very important to tell from a glimpse of eye if a traveller was a citizen, an equites or a senator, or legionary. People sealed and signed letters with the rings and its falsification could bring death.
The fugitive slaves didn’t have rings but iron collars with texts like “If found, return me to X” which also helped to recognise them. The domesticus slaves (the ones that lived in houses) didn’t wore the collar but sometimes were marked. A ring discovered 50 years ago is now believed to possibly be the ring of Pontius Pilate himself, and it was the same copper-bronze form ring as is this one. It comes within a complimentary box, but not exactly as the one shown.
The ring is 2 cm across.

Code: 23964

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SOLD A Superb 1822 Pattern French Light Cavalry Sabre, In Near Mint Condition.

SOLD A Superb 1822 Pattern French Light Cavalry Sabre, In Near Mint Condition.

It would likely be impossible to ever see a better example. This Light Cavalry 1822 Pattern was carried by all French light cavalry, Horse Chasseurs, Hussars, Lancers, Horse Artillery, Spahis, Goumiers and used in all campaigns from the Mexican expeditions to the Crimean wars, the colonial wars in North Africa and WW1, for more than 100 years. On January 18, 1822, the Committee of cavalry decided unanimously in favour of a curved sword for the entire Light Cavalry, using a Montmorency type blade.The curved blade has a wide fuller on each side to within 160 mm from the point and a thin 550 mm fuller on each side near the back edge which is engraved Manu. d'Armes de Chattll Avril 1876 = Cavalerie Mle 1822. Also used in WW1.The charge of the French Light Cavalry against the Germans on the road to Lassigny (a village between Montvidier and Noyon in France) during World War One in 1914. No scabbard, in combat use it has received a tiny impact on its tip

Code: 23978

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A Stunning, Historical, Norman, King Stephen of England period Single-Handed Knight's Sword 12th century AD, Used In the Early Crusades Era

A Stunning, Historical, Norman, King Stephen of England period Single-Handed Knight's Sword 12th century AD, Used In the Early Crusades Era

What a fabulous original ‘statement piece’ for any collection or decor. In the world of collecting there is so little remaining in the world from this highly significant era in European and British history. And to be able to own and display such an iconic original representation from this time is nothing short of a remarkable privilege. A wonderful example piece, from the ancient knightly age. Effectively, from this time of almost a thousand years ago, from a collectors point of view, nothing else significant survives at all, only the odd small coin or very rarely seen, and almost impossible to own, carved statuary.
A wondrous hand-forged iron knight's sword with slender blade and shallow fuller to each face, shallow point, gently curved rectangular-section cross guard, broad flat-section tang; the original pommel has been replaced by a plain domed type, perhaps Oakeshott's designated Type B.1 pommel. 12th-early 13th century, used in the early Crusades Period by Knights, such as the Knights of Jerusalem the Knights Templar, Knights of St John, made from time of King Stephen, and used into the times of King Henry the IInd, and King Richard the Ist. Made around the time of the reign of the Norman king, King Stephen,
Stephen of Blois, King of England who reigned from 22 December 1135 till 1154..
He was Count of Boulogne, from 1125 until 1147, and Duke of Normandy from 1135 until 1144. His reign was marked by the Anarchy, a civil war with his cousin and rival, the Empress Matilda, whose son, Henry II, succeeded Stephen as the first of the Angevin kings of England. The first of the Plantagenets,
Henry the II 1154-1189. Henry of Anjou was a most strong king, and a brilliant soldier, and he thus extended his French lands until he ruled most of France. He laid the foundation of the English Jury System and raised new taxes (scutage) from the landholders to pay for a militia force. Henry is mostly remembered for his quarrel with Thomas Becket, and Becket’s subsequent murder in Canterbury Cathedral on 29th December 1170. His sons turned against him, even his favourite John. A very small portion of his reign was depicted in the film ‘The Lion in Winter’ starring Peter O’Toole and Katherine Hepburn. It was a remarkable depiction of the latter part of his reign which showed with great aplomb the relationship between him, his wife the Queen of Anjou and his sons Geoffrey, John and Richard,[played by Anthony Hopkins] his eventual successor, King Richard Ist [The Lionheart] 1189 – 1199
Richard was the third son of Henry II. By the age of 16, he was leading his own army putting down rebellions in France. Although crowned King of England, Richard spent all but 6 months of his reign abroad, preferring to use the taxes from his kingdom to fund his various armies and military ventures. He was the leading Christian commander during the Third Crusade. On his way back from Palestine, Richard was captured and held for ransom. The amount paid for his safe return almost bankrupt the country. Richard died from an arrow-wound, far from the kingdom that he so rarely visited. He had no children. . Incredibly swords of this time, providing they stayed within the ancestral family of the knights for whom it was originally made in the 1100s, could still have been used up to and including the Battle of Agincourt in 1415. Sword design had not changed a great deal in that time and if an English knight had had a famous ancestor from several generations before using the sword, it is easily conceivable that he would continue to use it in combat into the 15 century. The Battle of Agincourt was a major English victory in the Hundred Years' War. The battle took place on 25 October 1415 (Saint Crispin's Day) in the County of Saint-Pol, Artois, some 40 km south of Calais. Along with the battles of Crécy (1346) and Poitiers (1356), it was one of the most important English triumphs in the conflict. England's victory at Agincourt against a numerically superior French army crippled France, and started a new period in the war during which the English began enjoying great military successes.

After several decades of relative peace, the English had renewed their war effort in 1415 amid the failure of negotiations with the French. In the ensuing campaign, many soldiers perished due to disease and the English numbers dwindled, but as they tried to withdraw to English-held Calais they found their path blocked by a considerably larger French army. Despite the disadvantage, the following battle ended in an overwhelming tactical victory for the English.

King Henry V of England led his troops into battle and participated in hand-to-hand fighting. The French king of the time, Charles VI, did not command the French army himself, as he suffered from severe psychotic illnesses with moderate mental incapacitation. Instead, the French were commanded by Constable Charles d'Albret and various prominent French noblemen of the Armagnac party.

This battle is notable for the use of the English longbow in very large numbers, with the English and Welsh archers forming up to 80 percent of Henry's army. The decimation of the French cavalry at their hands is regarded as an indicator of the decline of cavalry and the beginning of the dominance of ranged weapons on the battlefield.

Agincourt is one of England's most celebrated victories. The battle is the centrepiece of the play Henry V by Shakespeare. Juliet Barker in her book Agincourt: The King, the Campaign, the Battle ( published in 2005) argues the English and Welsh were outnumbered "at least four to one and possibly as much as six to one". She suggests figures of about 6,000 for the English and 36,000 for the French, based on the Gesta Henrici's figures of 5,000 archers and 900 men-at-arms for the English, and Jean de Wavrin's statement "that the French were six times more numerous than the English". The 2009 Encyclopædia Britannica uses the figures of about 6,000 for the English and 20,000 to 30,000 for the French.

We will include for the new owner a complimentary wooden display stand, but this amazing ancient artefact of antiquity would also look spectacular mounted within a bespoke case frame, or, on a fine cabinet maker constructed display panel.

Formerly the property of a private family; previously acquired from a collection formed before 1990; thence by descent.
Information;
Cf. Oakeshott, E., Records of the Medieval Sword, Woodbridge, 1991, item Xa.8, for type. 85cm (33 1/2" long). Exceptionally fair condition, very good indeed for age..

Code: 23251

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A Very Inexpensive Original, Ancient, 500 Year Old Koto Period Chisa Katana, with Original, Edo Period Fine Mounts

A Very Inexpensive Original, Ancient, 500 Year Old Koto Period Chisa Katana, with Original, Edo Period Fine Mounts

A very nice and ancient samurai sword, that has very fine original Edo period mounts of gold onlaid décor of samurai arrow flights over a fine nanako ground on the swords kashira with it's matching nanako ground fushi. The tsuba is signed, deep takebori of a pony and figure and bundles of wheat sheaves with highlight in gold. The tsukaito is traditional black silk over giant ray-skin [samegawa] and a pair of menuki of shakudo and gold phoenix. This sword originally came together from an early collection with an original samurai’s Yabusami, a samurai bowman's sleeve [see stock code number 21518] as would be worn with tradition samurai combat armour, so it may indeed have been originally the bowman's katana. The blade has a very nice hamon with a brightly polished kissaki, and a very small face impact line, [about 5 mm] on one blade face, no doubt in our opinion caused during its use in combat. It is a beautiful historical piece of original samurai weaponry around 500 years old. The Chisa Katana is a slightly shorter Katana highly suitable for two handed, or two sword combat, or, combat within enclosed areas such as castles or buildings. As such they were often the sword of choice for the personal Samurai guard of a Daimyo, and generally the only warriors permitted to be armed in his presence. Chisa katana, Chiisagatana or literally "short katana", are shoto mounted as katana. Of all the weapons that man has developed since caveman days, few evoke such fascination as the samurai sword of Japan. To many of us in the West, the movie image of the samurai in his fantastic armour, galloping into battle on his horse, his colourful personal flag, or sashimono, whipping in the wind on his back, has become the very symbol of Japan, the Empire of the Rising Sun. And, truly, to the samurai of real life, nothing embodied his warrior’s code of Bushido more than his sword, considered inseparable from his soul. Overall in saya 35 inches, blade tsuba to tip 21.5 inches. The samurai bowman sleeve is for sale separately. The blade is absolutely beautiful and its surface shows the hamon pattern very well indeed, but it does have some near invisible blade features and marks etc. But absolutely as one might expect due to its continual use as a combat sword for likely an incredible 350 years. In many respects it is, in our opinion, our greatest privilege to own, even briefly, such incredible pieces of samurai art as this one, to hold in one’s hands an item that has been used by so many noble warriors, for so many hundreds of years, and to look as good as the day it was made, up to 500 years ago is actually remarkable. For example, we have many dozens of steel swords, late medieval, for example, up to and between 500 to 700 years old, and certainly some up to 2000 years old, but, those swords are not from Japan, but from Europe, and every one of those will have all the usual signs of great ageing and wear, likely being very russeted, and certainly no surviving additional mounts to speak of, and this is totally the norm, and absolutely as to be expected and thus accepted. In every great collection around the world, all such steel swords from early European history, that have survived as long as these Japanese swords, look worn, aged, and somewhat tired, compared to how they once beautifully looked when first made and carried into combat. However, this not at all so with almost all surviving ancient Japanese swords, and that some, can and do, look as almost good as new, even if some of their blades are surface grey and lack bright polish, so, by comparison, effectively, there is no comparison between the great ancient samurai swords and every other countries similarly aged surviving swords.

Code: 23996

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A Very Fine Antique Victorian Hawthorn 'Country' Sword Stick by Wilkinson of Pall Mall London

A Very Fine Antique Victorian Hawthorn 'Country' Sword Stick by Wilkinson of Pall Mall London

a very sound and strong example in super condition. Fully deluxe etched blade by Willkinson Sword Company of Pall Mall. As used by the local squire in the British countryside as an eminently effective defence against armed poachers. The swordstick was a popular fashion accessory for the wealthy during the 18th and 19th centuries. While the weapon's origins are unknown, it is apparent that the cane-sword's popularity peaked when decorative swords were steadily being replaced by canes as a result of the rising popularity of firearms, and the lessening influence of swords and other small arms.

The first sword canes were made for nobility by leading sword cutlers. Sixteenth century sword canes were often bequeathed in wills. Sword canes became more popular as the streets became less safe. Society dictated it mandatory that gentlemen of the 18th and especially 19th centuries would wear a cane when out and about, and it was common for the well-dressed gentleman to own and sport canes in a variety of styles, including a good and sound sword cane. Although world renowned poet Lord Byron was proficient in the use of pistols, his lameness and his need to defend himself in some potentially dangerous situations made a swordstick doubly useful to him. He received lessons in London from the fencing master Henry Angelo and owned a number of swordsticks, some of which were supplied by his boxing instructor Gentleman John Jackson. The name Noel Byron on the ferrule of his one indicated that it was used after 1822, when Byron added the surname Noel after the death of his mother-in-law.

There are several references to sword sticks in the correspondence of Byron and his circle. Byron wrote to Hobhouse from Switzerland on 23 June 1816 asking him to Bring with you also for me some bottles of Calcined Magnesia a new Sword cane procured by Jackson he alone knows the sort (my last tumbled into this lake ) some of Waite's red tooth-powder & tooth-brushes a Taylor's Pawrsanias Pausanias and I forget the other things. Hobhouse responded on 9 July: Your commissions shall be punctually fulfilled whether as to muniments for the mind or body, pistol, brushes, cundums, potash Prafsanias Pausanias tooth powder and a sword stick.

In the entry for 22 September 1816 in Byron's Alpine Journal he describes how, at the foot of the Jungfrau,
"Storm came on , thunder, lightning, hail, all in perfection and beautiful, I was on horseback the Guide wanted to carry my cane I was going to give it him when I recollected it was a Sword stick and I thought that the lightning might be attracted towards him kept it myself a good deal encumbered with it & my cloak as it was too heavy for a whip and the horse was stupid & stood still every other peal."

In a letter to Maria Gisborne of 6-10 April 1822, Mary Shelley described the "Pisan affray" of 24 March, in which Sergeant-Major Masi was pitch-forked by one of Byron's servants. She recounted how Byron rode to his own house, and got a sword stick from one of his servants.
Overall 37 inches long overall complete, blade 28.25 inches long

Code: 24001

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