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SOLD A Superb & Rare Georgian General's Combat Sabre With Combat Hand Sharpened Blade

King George IVth [formerly the Prince Regent], the British King from 1820-1830, son of King George IIIrd. Made by the King's swordmaker Prosser. A stunning example of an 1822 pattern sword made and used by a general in around 1825 and potentially used, by successive generals, up to the 1880's. The Gothic hilt bears the symbol of a British General of a pierced crossed marshal's baton and sabre within a wreath. Pipe back blade with makers name, GR IV cypher and another general's crossed sabre and baton. Four piece leather and gilt mounted scabbard in overall very nice condition indeed. The was the type of sabre as was used in hand to hand combat by a British Army General in such as the Crimean War and the Indian Mutiny, plus numerous others. It may be surprising by comparison to the late 20th and 21st century that many generals of all nations in the previous centuries fought in combat alongside their men. Napoleon for example lost 161 generals in combat and Wellington 99, [not including injuries]. And contrary to the modern myth of the isolated old fashioned British generals of WW1, 78 were killed in action. Interestingly combat deaths we’re not always the worst fate for some generals, in Russia, for example, by 1938 of 93% of all Russian generals [and 65,000 other officers] had been executed by jolly old ‘Uncle Joe’ Stalin up to three years before the war even started. However, America fortunately only lost 11 generals KIA [or died of wounds] in WW2, 2 were executed by the Japanese, and 1 was killed by friendly fire. Britain lost 23 generals killed in WW2 [ plus 1 Lt General killed on the battleship USS New Mexico, while as a British representative to Gen. MacArthur, during an American bombardment against the Japanese at Luzon, by a Kamikaze pilot] plus 6 British Generals died as POWs.

The British Crimean War was a military conflict fought from October 1853 to February 1856 in which Russia lost to an alliance made up of the Ottoman Empire, the United Kingdom, Sardinia and France. The immediate cause of the war involved the rights of Christian minorities in the Holy Land, then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The British army’s percentage of casualties in the Crimean War was actually worse than in the Great War of 1914/18. The Indian Rebellion of 1857 was a major, but ultimately unsuccessful, uprising in India in 1857–58 against the rule of the British East India Company, which functioned as a sovereign power on behalf of the British Crown. The rebellion began on 10 May 1857 in the form of a mutiny of sepoys of the Company's army in the garrison town of Meerut, 40 mi (64 km) northeast of Delhi (now Old Delhi). It then erupted into other mutinies and civilian rebellions chiefly in the upper Gangetic plain and central India, athough incidents of revolt also occurred farther north and east. The rebellion posed a considerable threat to British power in that region, and was contained only with the rebels' defeat in Gwalior on 20 June 1858. On 1 November 1858, the British granted amnesty to all rebels not involved in murder, though they did not declare the hostilities to have formally ended until 8 July 1859. Its name is contested, and it is variously described as the Sepoy Mutiny, the Indian Mutiny, the Great Rebellion, the Revolt of 1857.

Code: 23430

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A Fabulous Original "Battle Of Waterloo" Souvenir Pick-Up

SOLD An original lead statuette of the Emperor Napoleon Bonaparte carried by a soldier in French army at Waterloo, together with a small stone from the field with two small handwritten notes "from the Field of the Battle of Waterloo" affixed to the stone. Both these pieces were recovered from the battle site after the battle by an officer of the Coldstream guards who revisited the site a few years later and brought home as a fabulous keepsake. These small statuettes were bought and carried by many of his soldiers as members of the Cult of Napoleon. This was common practice amongst Napoleonic soldiery. Tucked away in a soldier’s deerskin knapsack, these talismans were both a sign of devotion and also of good fortune. The identical one in the photograph in the gallery is from Gilles Bernard and Gerard Lechaux' book, Waterloo Relics, it shows exactly the same style of statuette of Napoleon, in an exhibit in the Musee 'Dernier quartier general de Napoleon" collection. In Caillou Farm. Napoleon’s Last Headquarters before the battle On the eve of the Battle of Waterloo, General Bertrand, the Emperor’s aide-de-camp, had Napoleon’s headquarters established at the the Caillou farm. The Emperor, surrounded by his General Staff, spent the night of 17th to 18th June 1815 camped in the orchard under the protection of the Imperial Guard. The next day’s battle plans were drawn up in the rooms of the farmhouse.

Code: 23429

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A Very Good WW2 Japanese Silk Flag. Souvenir of a WW2 Pacific War Veteran

In good condition overall with just a small hole and tiny tear . Excellent light as a feather silk. The scarcer allied soldiers souvenir flag from the Pacific War campaign. The is the simple orange disc circle on a plain white ground. Since ancient times, the sun has been a symbol of national unity because of the close relationship between national rule and the sun. When Taira was destroyed and the samurai government was established by Genji, successive shoguns claimed to be descendants of Genji, and it was said that the Hinomaru of "Shirachikamaru" , [ red circle on white background] had been inherited as a symbol of those who achieved the unification of the country. In Japan, "red and white" has been regarded as a joyous colour scheme

Code: 23409

195.00 GBP

Archived


A Fabulous 1796 Napoleonic Wars British Dragoon Officer's Sword

By Tatham, Sword Cutler To His Majesty, Charing Cross, London. Deeply curved crescentric blade, beautifully engraved with a dismounted light dragoon officer wearing his Tarlton helmet. Mercurial gilt hilt cast with acanthus leaf decor across the knucklebow guard etc. In 1796 a new form of sabre was designed by a brave and serving officer, Le Marchant. Le Marchant commanded the cavalry squadron during the Flanders campaign against the French (1793-94). Taking notice of comments made to him by an Austrian Officer describing British Troopers swordplay as "reminiscent of a farmer chopping wood", he designed a new light cavalry sword to improve the British cavalryman's success. It was adopted by the Army in 1797 and was used for 20 years. Le Marchant was highly praised by many for his superb design and he further developed special training and exercise regimes. King George IIIrd was especially impressed and learnt them all by heart and encouraged their use throughout the cavalry corps. For a reward Le Marchant was promoted to Lt Colonel and given command of the 7th Light Dragoons. The mounted swordsmanship training of the British emphasised the cut, at the face for maiming or killing, or at the arms to disable. This left masses of mutilated or disabled troops; the French, in contrast, favoured the thrust, which gave cleaner kills. A cut with the 1796 LC sabre was, however, perfectly capable of killing outright, as was recorded by George Farmer of the 11th Regiment of Light Dragoons, who was involved in a skirmish on the Guadiana River in 1811, during the Peninsular War:
"Just then a French officer stooping over the body of one of his countrymen, who dropped the instant on his horse's neck, delivered a thrust at poor Harry Wilson's body; and delivered it effectually. I firmly believe that Wilson died on the instant yet, though he felt the sword in its progress, he, with characteristic self-command, kept his eye on the enemy in his front; and, raising himself in his stirrups, let fall upon the Frenchman's head such a blow, that brass and skull parted before it, and the man's head was cloven asunder to the chin. It was the most tremendous blow I ever beheld struck; and both he who gave, and his opponent who received it, dropped dead together. The brass helmet was afterwards examined by order of a French officer, who, as well as myself, was astonished at the exploit; and the cut was found to be as clean as if the sword had gone through a turnip, not so much as a dint being left on either side of it" The blade is remembered today as one of the best of its time and has been described as the finest cutting sword ever manufactured in quantity. Leather original scabbard good condition overall for age, small service repair to leather.

Code: 23403

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A Superb Royal Naval Officer's Fighting Sword/Cutlass Circa 1790's Monogrammed For A Junior Officer, Apparently Wounded at Trafalgar

SOLD This combat sword bears one of the rarest features we have ever seen on a Napoleonic period sword of a Royal Naval officer. It has a blade engraved with a Royal Naval warship, bearing the usual British royal crown of King George IIIrd, but also an engraving of British Naval Man O'War, along with his monogram J.S.C.S. We can't recall how long ago it was that we saw a depiction of a British warship engraved on such an early sword before. In fact it is very rare to be seen on British swords at all, although it can seen on German naval officer's dirks from the 20th century. As it is a typical purchased naval battle sword for an officer from the 1790's it could conceivably been used first by his father Capt John Samuel as a combat cutlass, and then given to his son when he joined the service, but this we can never know. The hilt and wire bound sharkskin grip is very good indeed, as is the blade, very grey with worn out areas of engraving, but all the engraving is easily identifiable. Obvious signs of combat use, as to be expected, but still very good overall. A tremendous amount of research has been undertaken, and that research has determined that the monogram is almost certainly for Lt. John Samuel C. Smith RN. He was serving as a midshipman, [and later lieutenant in 1813] on HMS Minotaur, a 74 gunner, and was wounded at Trafalgar. He died in 1840. He was the son of Captain John Samuel Smith who died in 1796. His grandfather sailed in Commodore George Anson's circumnavigation of the globe during the early 1740 s.
In 1772 his father John Samuel Smith was serving in the West Indies as a midshipman, and by 1777 was employed on that station as a sailing master. He was commissioned lieutenant in August 1778.

In July 1781 he was promoted commander, and in the summer of 1782 joined the store-ship San Carlos [22 gunner], serving in the East Indies and being present at the Battle of Trincomale on 3 September. Having already been posted captain on 29 July 1782 he was commanding the Exeter [64 gunner] in the spring of 1783 and fought at the Battle of Cuddalore on 20 June where she lost four men killed and nine wounded. After sailing for the Cape his command was deemed to be un-seaworthy and was destroyed on 12 February 1784.

During the Spanish Armament of 1790 Smith commissioned the new Castor [32 gunner] before paying her off later that year. He then recommissioned the Saint George 98 for the flag of Rear-Admiral Sir Richard King during the spring of 1791, retaining her through the Russian Armament and paying her off that autumn.

He was the flag captain to Rear-Admiral Sir Richard King, the commander-in-chief of the Newfoundland station aboard the Assistance [50 gunner] from April 1792 and the new Stately [64 gunner] from March 1793, returning home each winter.
[
Smith commanded the Excellent [74 gunner] during May and June 1794 and in August 1795 joined the Captain [74 gunner], serving in the Mediterranean. Suffering from ill health, he exchanged with Captain Horatio Nelson of the Agamemnon [64 gunner] in the Mediterranean on 11 June 1796.

Captain Smith died at Gibraltar shortly after joining the Agamemnon, which ship returned home to be paid off at Chatham on 19 September.

His sons, William, who served with him from 1792 and John S. C. Smith, both entered the navy.

In the late 1780 s Smith was a witness to a House of Lords committee regarding his witnessing of the abhorrent treatment of slaves in the West Indies.

The Minotaur was built at Woolwich in 1793. Her
dimensions are given as: length on the lower deck,
172 feet; breadth, 48 feet; depth, 19 feet; and tons
burthen, 1721. She was commissioned in 1794 by
Captain Thomas Louis, one of Nelson’s band of brothers, and under him she joined the fleet in the Mediterranean, bearing the flag of Vice-Admiral MacBride; later on serving with Rear-Admiral George Montagu's force. She bore a distinguished part in the battle of the Nile, the 1st August 1798, in which she was sixth in the line, and the biggest ship
engaged.Minotaur fought at the battle of the Nile in 1798, engaging the Aquilon with HMS Theseus and forcing her surrender. In the battle Minotaur lost 23 men dead and 64 wounded.

After the French surrendered Rome on 29 September 1799, Captain Thomas Louis had his barge crew row him up the Tiber River where he raised the Union Jack over the Capitol.

In May 1800, Minotaur served as the flagship of Vice-Admiral Lord Keith at the siege of Genoa.The naval squadron consisted of Minotaur, Phoenix, Mondovi, Entreprenante, and the tender Victoire.

On 28 April, the squadron captured the Proteus, off Genoa.

On 8 January 1801 Penelope captured the French bombard St. Roche, which was carrying wine, liqueurs, ironware, Delfth cloth, and various other merchandise, from Marseilles to Alexandria. Swiftsure, Tigre, Minotaur, Northumberland, Florentina, and the schooner Malta, were in sight and shared in the proceeds of the capture.

She was present at the landings in Aboukir Bay during the invasion of Egypt in 1801 where she lost a total of three men killed, and six wounded.[10] Because Minotaur served in the navy's Egyptian campaign (8 March to 8 September 1801), her officers and crew qualified for the clasp "Egypt" to the Naval General Service Medal that the Admiralty authorised in 1850 to all surviving claimants.

On 28 May 1803 Minotaur, in company with Thunderer, and later joined by Albion, captured the French frigate Franchise. Franchise was 33 days out of Port-au-Prince, and was pierced for twenty-eight 12-pounder guns on her main deck and sixteen 9-pounders on her quarterdeck and forecastle, ten of which were in her hold. She had a crew of 187 men under the command of Captain Jurien.

Minotaur was present at the surrender of the French garrison at Civitavecchia on 21 September 1804. She shared the prize money for the capture of the town and fortress with Culloden, Mutine, Transfer, and the bomb vessel Perseus. The British also captured the French polacca Il Reconniscento.

Minotaur, under Captain Charles John Moore Mansfield, participated in the Battle of Trafalgar. There she was instrumental in capturing the Spanish ship Neptuno, although Neptuno's crew recaptured her in the storm that followed the battle.

Minotaur was towards the rear of Nelson's wing of his fleet at Trafalgar. Mansfield pledged to his assembled crew that he would stick to any ship he engaged "till either she strikes or sinks – or I sink". Late in the battle he deliberately placed Minotaur between the damaged Victory and an attacking French ship; he was later awarded a sword and gold medal for his gallantry. Both are now in the National Maritime Museum
The Minotaur at the battle of Trafalgar
An hour before the battle, Captain Mansfield mustered the ships company and spoke to them as follows:

"Men, we are now in the sight of the enemy whom there is every probability of engaging; and I trust that this day, or tomorrow, will prove the most glorious our country ever saw. I shall say nothing to you of courage: our country never produced a coward. For my own part I pledge myself to the officers and ship’s company not to quit the ship I may get alongside of till either she strikes or sinks – or I sink. I have only to recommend silence and strict attention to the orders of your officers. Be careful to take good aim, for it is to no purpose to throw shot away. You will now, every man, repair to your respective stations, and depend, I will bring the ship into action as soon as possible.
God save the King!"
Captain Mansfield kept his pledge, and not by sinking.
By the end of the day the Minotaur had played a pivotal role in defending the Victory against the counter attack by Rear Admiral Dumanoir's squadron, and had captured the Spanish Neptuno. The sword has no surviving scabbard. We have shown the monogram with added black script below in the photo for illustration purposes.

Code: 23392

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A Beautiful Early 17th Century Shinto Wakazashi

All original Edo period mountings, iron leaf shaped tsuba, most beautiful polished blade with elegant sugaha hamon. Delightful kozuka utility knife, Wakizashi have been in use as far back as the 15th or 16th century. The wakizashi was used as a backup or auxiliary sword; it was also used for close quarters fighting, and also to behead a defeated opponent and sometimes to commit ritual suicide. The wakizashi was one of several short swords available for use by samurai including the yoroi toshi, the chisa-katana and the tanto. The term wakizashi did not originally specify swords of any official blade length and was an abbreviation of "wakizashi no katana" ("sword thrust at one's side"); the term was applied to companion swords of all sizes. It was not until the Edo period in 1638 when the rulers of Japan tried to regulate the types of swords and the social groups which were allowed to wear them that the lengths of katana and wakizashi were officially set.

Kanzan Sato, in his book titled "The Japanese Sword", notes that the wakizashi may have become more popular than the tanto due to the wakizashi being more suited for indoor fighting. He mentions the custom of leaving the katana at the door of a castle or palace when entering while continuing to wear the wakizashi inside. Wakizashi were worn on the left side, secured to the obi [waist sash]. overall 24 inches long in saya, blade 17.25 inches long

Code: 23391

3450.00 GBP

Archived


A Very Fine 18th Century Brass Barrelled Naval Blunderbuss Pistol

SOLD Made by Jones of London, prior to the Napoleonic wars, used in the Battle of the Nile Period, and through the Battle of Trafalgar and onwards until the 1830's. Brass barrel with Tower of London proof marks. Lock engraved Jones, rolling frizzen and sliding safety catch, brass furniture with acorn finial trigger guard, juglans regia walnut stock with pistol grip. On 1st August 1798 at Aboukir Bay near Alexandria, Egypt, the Battle of the Nile began. The conflict was an important tactical naval encounter fought between the British Royal Navy and the Navy of the French Republic. For two days the battle raged, with Napoleon Bonaparte seeking a strategic gain from Egypt; however this was not to be. Under the command of Sir Horatio Nelson the British fleet sailed to victory and blasted the ambitions of Napoleon out of the water. Nelson, although wounded in battle, would return home victorious, remembered as a hero in Britain’s battle to win control of the seas. The Battle of the Nile was a significant chapter in a much larger conflict known as the French Revolutionary Wars. In 1792 war had broken out between the French Republic and several other European powers, instigated by the bloody and shocking events of the French Revolution. Whilst the European allies were keen to assert their strength over France and restore the monarchy, by 1797 they were still to achieve their aims. The second part of the war, known as the War of the Second Coalition began in 1798 when Napoleon Bonaparte decided to invade Egypt and hamper Britain’s expanding territories.

As the French put their plans into action in the summer of 1798, the British government led by William Pitt became aware that the French were preparing for an attack in the Mediterranean. Although the British were unsure as to the exact target, the government gave instructions to John Jervis, the Commander in Chief of the British fleet, to dispatch ships under the command of Nelson to monitor the French naval movements from Toulon. The orders from the British government were clear: discover the purpose of the French manoeuvre and then destroy it. Ship's Captains found such impressive guns so desireable as they had two prime functions to clear the decks with one shot, and the knowledge to an assailant that the pistol hads the capability to achieve such a result. In the 18th and 19th century mutiny was a common fear for all commanders, and not a rare as one might imagine. The Capt. Could keep about his person or locked in his gun cabinet in his quarters a gun just as this. But without doubt its best purpose could be used by the captain and his officers in the melee of close combat during their boarding of enemy vessels, or, to counter the boarding by the crews of enemy vessels. The barrel could be loaded with single ball or swan shot, ball twice as large as normal shot, that when discharged at close quarter could be devastating, and terrifyingly effective. Potentially taken out four or five assailants at once. The muzzle was swamped like a cannon for two reasons, the first for ease of rapid loading, the second for intimidation. There is a very persuasive psychological point to the size of this gun's muzzle, as any person or persons facing it could not fail to fear the consequences of it's discharge, and the act of surrender or retreat in the face of an well armed blunderbuss could be a happy and desirable result for all parties concerned. 11.5 Inches long overall, barrel length 6 inches, muzzle 1.25 inches

Code: 23388

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A Nice 19th Century English Revolver Webley-Bentley-Adams Pistol Case

Fitted for a 90 bore revolver with a very fine 90 bore combination 'ball & bullet' mold by Adams without cut off guillotine. Plus, a very good F.Joyce & Co percussion cap tin bearing the maker logo of ICI interestingly. No revolver included. A very good original item that could treble the value of an uncased suitable revolver. Ext size 227 mm x 156 mm, height 55 mm, internal max 201mm x 128 mm, height 39 mm muzzle to hammer aperture max 152mm

Code: 23384

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Adolf Hitler's Mein Kampf. Presentation 1938 Wedding Issue.

Presentation copy, in marbled ivory and blue leather, with the city crest in gold embossed thereon, but unusually never awarded, so the presentation page is not completed or signed. A most scarce original copy, but without its handwritten dedication to the recipients, to be presented by the unnamed city Burgermeister for a traditional Nazi wedding, signed with Adolf Hitler's facsimile signature. Wedding editions were specially made bindings in blue half leather and were imprinted with the City State's symbol. SS couples were given a copy within a wooden casket carved with sigrunen SS upon the lid. This copy's box is no longer existing. It would have a special printed page inside with a space for the handwritten newlyweds names, date, and signature from the Burgomeister or Mayor who was presenting it to the new couple as a wedding gift from the Fuhrer and state. Mein Kampf ("My Struggle") is an autobiographical manifesto by Nazi leader Adolf Hitler, in which he outlines his political ideology and future plans for Germany. Volume 1 of Mein Kampf was published in 1925 and Volume 2 in 1926. The book was edited by the former Hieronymite friar Bernhard Stempfle, who was murdered during the Night of the Long Knives.

Hitler began dictating the book to his deputy Rudolf Hess while imprisoned for what he considered to be "political crimes" following his failed Putsch in Munich in November 1923. Although Hitler received many visitors initially, he soon devoted himself entirely to the book. As he continued, Hitler realized that it would have to be a two-volume work, with the first volume scheduled for release in early 1925. The governor of Landsberg noted at the time that "he [Hitler] hopes the book will run into many editions, thus enabling him to fulfill his financial obligations and to defray the expenses incurred at the time of his trial." It is an intriguing premise that it is possible this very book may well have been instrumental in the cause of Hitler’s dominance over Europe potentially the war itself.

It was only because this book became the world best seller that the income from it was used by Hitler to fund his political ambitions and many of his political meetings in the early 1930s.

It is a Sobering thought to believe that a book can have such a significant part in world history. Some books obviously become very much for the good of mankind, others not so. Alongside Das Kapital by Karl Marx it is nonetheless true that it places these books amongst the most significant ever written and published in the 580 year history of the printed word.

Code: 23365

350.00 GBP

Archived


Original British Officer's Combat Sword Crimean War to Zulu War Period Use

Circa 1850. Fine fully etched bright steel blade, gothic open pierced VR cypher hilt with wire bound sharkskin covered grip, bright polished steel combat scabbard. A super example, that would compliment any fine collection of antique arms, and this is exactly the same form and pattern of sword as was used and worn by Lt Bromhead VC at Rorke's Drift, including its steel combat scabbard, during the Zulu War of 1879. See the publicity promotion photo of Sir Micheal Caine as Bromhead in ZULU, with his identical sword. On the morning of 22 Jan 1879, some 20,000 Zulu warriors attacked a British invading army. They carried spears and clubs; the British were armed with modern rifles and two heavy guns.

But the Zulu commander, Ntshingwayo, deserves to be remembered as one of the greatest generals in African history. First he used a masterly deception plan to lure Lord Chelmsford, the British commander, and 3,000 troops away from their main camp at the foot of Mount Isandlwana and send them on a wild goose chase across the plains.

Then Ntshingwayo opened a massive attack on the weakened British force left in the camp. He deployed his warriors in a classic "buffalo horns" formation. The left horn broke through the British firing line, while the right swept around behind Isandlwana and occupied the supply depot and ox-wagon train. They separated the British from their ammunition supply and also stampeded their oxen, sending about 4,500 animals careering across the veldt.

In the ensuing chaos, the British were overwhelmed and cut to pieces. Of 1,774 British and African troops in the camp, only 55 survived. Some 14 British soldiers, led by Capt Reginald Younghusband of the 24th Foot, made a last stand on the slopes of the mountain. Zulu sources record that the men shook hands before making a final bayonet charge.

Code: 23363

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