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SOLD A Good British Royal Artillery Sword in FS Scabbard, WW1 King George Vth Cypher

With fully etched blade.Nice bright finish, nickel three bar hilt and wire bound sharkskin grip. Fully etched blade with King George Vth cypher and wings and lightning flashes of the Royal Artillery. Overall suitable for current service use. On 1 July 1899, the Royal Artillery was divided into three groups: the Royal Horse Artillery of 21 batteries and the Royal Field Artillery of 95 batteries comprised one group, while the coastal defence, mountain, siege and heavy batteries were split off into another group named the Royal Garrison Artillery of 91 companies. The third group continued to be titled simply Royal Artillery, and was responsible for ammunition storage and supply. Which branch a gunner belonged to was indicated by metal shoulder titles (R.A., R.F.A., R.H.A., or R.G.A.). The RFA and RHA also dressed as mounted men, whereas the RGA dressed like foot soldiers. In 1920 the rank of Bombardier was instituted in the Royal Artillery. The three sections effectively functioned as separate corps. This arrangement lasted until 1924, when the three amalgamated once more to became one regiment. In 1938, RA Brigades were renamed Regiments. During the Second World War there were over 1 million men serving in 960 gunner regiments. In 1947 the Riding House Troop RHA was renamed The King's Troop RHA and, in 1951, the title of the regiment's colonel-in-chief became Captain General. When The Queen first visited the Troop after her accession, it was expected that it would become "The Queen's Troop", but Her Majesty announced that in honour of her father's decision it would remain "The King's Troop".

The Royal Horse Artillery, which has always had separate traditions, uniforms and insignia, still retains a separate identity within the regiment.

Before the Second World War, Royal Artillery recruits were required to be at least 5 feet 4 inches (1.63 m) tall. Men in mechanised units had to be at least 5 feet 8 inches (1.73 m) tall. They initially enlisted for six years with the colours and a further six years with the reserve or four years and eight years. They trained at the Royal Artillery Depot in Woolwich. The blade has feint traces of surface pitting

Code: 23607

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SOLD A Good British,Edward VIIth, Ox and Bucks Light Infantry Rifles Officer's Sword in FS Scabbard,

Deluxe grade fully etched blade. Used by an officer who served in the Ox and Bucks Light Infantry. It was the Ox and Bucks that went in the Gliders to capture Pegasus Bridge on D-Day. This sword all steel hilt with traditional pierced basket with the Light Infantry Bugle. FS scabbard and steel blade with full etching. Overall light surface wear and very light remains of pitting. The Bucks Battalion of the regiment, when formed in 1908, was not allotted a number. As part of the 48th (South Midland) Division, the 1/1st Bucks Battalion fought on the Somme and at Ypres. In 1917 it moved to the Italian Front where it saw action at the Piave River and Vittorio Veneto. The 2/1st Battalion, which was formed in August 1914, also served on the Western Front, being disbanded at Germaine in February 1918. A third line unit was formed which joined the 3/4th Battalion as the 4th (Reserve) Battalion.

In 1939 the Bucks Battalion was divided as 1st and 2nd. The 1st suffered heavy casualties while serving with the BEF in France but in 1944 was able to play an important part in the Normandy assault landings. The 2nd Battalion, Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry (the 52nd) became an airborne battalion in 1941. Initially in 1st Airborne Division and then in 6th Airborne Division. The battalion provided the very first troops to land in Normandy in the D Day invasion of 1944. Their task was to secure vital bridges, some six miles inland, and to hold them until relieved by the sea borne invasion force.
Normandy

Shortly after midnight on the morning of 6th June 1944, a force of six Horsa gliders carrying 139 men of 2 Oxf & Bucks, together with 30 Royal Engineers, all under the command of Major R.J.Howard, landed in darkness to capture the bridges over the Caen Canal (Pegasus Bridge) and the River Orne (Horsa Bridge) by surprise coup de main raid.The attack on Pegasus Bridge was entirely successful and the bridge was held against fierce counter attacks until the Oxf & Bucks, joined by 7 Para, were relieved by sea borne troops.

Of the three gliders assigned to Horsa Bridge, two landed at the correct place and the Oxf & Bucks captured and held that bridge. The third glider was released at the wrong place and landed at the wrong bridge, a bridge over the River Dives about seven miles away. Nevertheless the Oxf & Bucks captured that bridge and then made their way to Ranville, through German lines, where they rejoined their batallion. Major John Howard was awarded the DSO for his skill and leadership in this action.

By the end of D+2, 6th Airborne Division was fully established on the East bank of the River Orne and held this vital sector for several months against repeated enemy attacks. The Oxf & Bucks played a major role in the major defensive battles at Escoville and Herouvillette from 7th to 14th June 1944, and then on the Breville Ridge for two months. After advancing to the River Seine in August, the battalion was withdrawn to England on 1st September 1944 to re-form.
Ardennes (The Battle of the Bulge)

The 2nd Oxf & Bucks were rushed back to Belgium to help counter the massive German breakthrough, which was intended to drive a wedge through to Antwerp, between the British and American armies. After extremely hard fighting in very cold weather, the German advance was turned into disaster when the British and American troops closed the neck of the bulge.
The Rhine Crossing

On 24th March 1945, 2 Oxf & Bucks took part in their second airborne operation, the Crossing of the Rhine. Although suffering over 400 casualties in the air and on landing. The battalion captured all of its objectives.

The bridge at Hamminkeln was taken by a platoon of the Oxf & Bucks by bayonet charge lead by Lieut Hugh Clark who was awarded an MC for this action. Determined counter attacks by German infantry and tanks were held off by 6 pdr anti tank guns of the Oxf & Bucks lead by Lieut David Rice, but with limited success. The 6 pdr shot simply bounced off the German Tiger tanks, but they were held off long enough for Royal Air Force Typhoon aircraft to be called up to finish them off.

The battalion then took a leading part in the 300 mile advance across Germany to meet the Russians near Wismar on the Baltic in May 1945. Most of the advance was on foot and it included an opposed assault crossing of the River Weser. The battalion was selected to provide the guard of honour for the meeting of Field Marshal Montgomery, with his Russian counterpart, Marshal Rokossovsky on 7th May 1945 at Wismar.
Conclusion

Few regiments of the British Army fought longer and harder than the 2 Oxf & Bucks in the great campaign from Normandy to the Baltic. "A Regiment never surpassed in arms since arms were first borne by man". (Sir William Napier 1820).

After several re-organisations of the British Army, the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry is incorporated in the Royal Green Jackets, which Regiment proudly continues the traditions and the spirit of its predecessor Regiments.This is certainly not a pristine sword, but what it lacks in condition it makes up for at least five fold with historical importance, as it was a regimental sword for one the most significant regiments involved in D-Day, and many of the more significant combat events that culminated in the German surrender.

Code: 23606

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SOLD A Super and Intriguing WW2 German Military Wrist Watch DI H. Known as the Surveillance Officer Type

Supposedly only 8000 ever made. A Helvetia fine & rare original German, Third Reich issue, 1940's military surveillance officer’s wrist watch, A Helvertia DIH, type 2b with the Helvetia type 82c signed Helvetia and Swiss made, movement, Deutsches Heer officer issue, but classified as the rare DI H
This watch was issued by the German military during the early 1940's of World War II, Helvetia were a renowned Swiss maker producing fine and accurate watches for the Nazi officers.
The case of the watch is nickel plated with light to average wear. The cream dial is in good condition with mixed Roman and Arabic numerals, with sub seconds hand dial at 6, signed Helvetia. Working order. Post War brown leather military style strap. Appears to work just fine, but a service recommended for wear purposes.

The movement is a hand wound Swiss movement. The watch sits on a brown leather military style strap.
The great majority of the companies were Swiss .
with Helvetia being one of the best, making superb timepieces. Stamped either side of the figure serial number, is the official Wehrmacht classification DI.H, with 3199 stamped above. However DH was the regular stamp classification but the much rarer type have DI H. This has always been the subject of debate amongst some collectors, due to some limited belief that they were assembled from parts, likely due to their rarity, however all the contentious examples have the Helvetia 800c movement, however this timepiece, alongside all the 'deemed correct' examples have the has the correct Helvetia 82c movement and the important 3199 stamp on the back case cover. In a seminal work “A Concise Guide to Military Timepieces 1880 -1990” by Z.M. Wesolowski IT specifies that the DI H marks are “Deutsches Heer property marks found on non-waterproof wristwatches with sweeping centre seconds used for surveillance purposes, the I in DIH may stand for Inteligenz or Italienisch [for surveillance officers and spies etc.].The Italienisch mark may have been for a contract for the specialist Italians serving with the Afrika Korps in the desert campaign under Rommel. See in the gallery three photographs of the standard watch type worn by officers during World War II in the German Heer/SS, one being Herbert Otto Gille, seen here as SS-Gruppenführer and commander of 5. SS Panzer Division Wiking. Helvetia DIH watches are relatively rare, it seems that only around 8000 of all types were ever completed

Code: 23604

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A Very Good German WW2 Iron Cross Ist Class Breast Badge Bravery Award

In very good condition, and the front and rear is completely untouched and shows 70 odd years of natural aging.The German Iron Cross medal for heroism came in two grades, Second Class and First Class. This example the Iron Cross First Class could only be awarded for an act of outstanding bravery and also to one who had previously received the Iron Cross Second Class. Hence, the First Class was more restricted and more highly prized. When the Iron Cross First Class was awarded, the Iron Cross Second Class was signified, when worn on the uniform, with a small ribbon attached across the tunic lapel attached to a button. Even when in combat the iron Cross first class was worn in the soldiers tunic on the left breast. Adolf Hitler was awarded his identical type of 1st Class Iron Cross in WW1, dated 1914, and always wore it throughout WW2 with pride. Next to the Victoria Cross, it is the most famous medal in the world. The Iron Cross was awarded for bravery in battle as well as other conspicuous military contributions in a battlefield environment. In order to receive the Iron Cross 1st Class the men of the Heer and Waffen SS would have had to perform three to four further acts of courage from the one that earned them the Iron Cross 2nd Class; The Luftwaffe and Kriegsmarine had the following criteria; the award was regularly awarded to U-boat Commanders upon sinking 50,000 tons and to Luftwaffe pilots when they achieved six or seven confirmed
kills; Of course these were only guidelines, and a single act of great importance or a long steady career could earn the individual the Cross. The Iron Cross 2nd Class came with a ribbon and was worn in one of two different methods: When in formal dress, the entire cross was worn mounted alone or as part of a medal bar. For everyday wear, only the ribbon was worn from the second hole in the tunic button.
The Iron Cross is a black four-pointed cross with white trim, with the arms widening toward the ends, similar to a cross pattee. It was designed by the neoclassical architect Karl Friedrich Schinkel and reflects the cross borne by the Teutonic Knights in the 14th century.

Initially the Iron Cross was worn with the blank side out. This did not change until 1838 when the sprig facing could be presented.

Since the Iron Cross was issued over several different periods of German history, it was annotated with the year indicating the era in which it was issued. For example, an Iron Cross from the First World War bears the year "1914", while the same decoration from the Second World War is annotated "1939". The reverse of the 1870, 1914 and 1939 series of Iron Crosses have the year "1813" appearing on the lower arm, symbolizing the year the award was created. The 1813 decoration also has the initials "FW" for King Frederick William III, while the next two have a "W" for the respective kaisers, Wilhelm I and Wilhelm II. The final version shows a swastika. A cross was the symbol of the Teutonic Knights (a heraldic cross pattee), and the cross design (but not the specific decoration) has been the symbol of Germany's armed forces (now the Bundeswehr) since 1871.

Code: 23366

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SOLD. A Superb 1796 King George IIIrd Officers Gilt Bullion & Silk Sword Knot

A rarely surviving piece of Napoleonic Wars British militaria. From the Napoleonic Wars and Waterloo period. With silver gilt wire bullion stripes on a red silk ground, with a bound silk and silver gilt tassel, with three original knotted slides. Very rare to find in such good condition, with perfect and natural ageing to the gilt bullion and red silk. An absolute joy to see, and as good as the best you can see in the Royal Collection. Used by a British officer in the Napoleonic Wars, including the Peninsular War in Spain and Portugal, and probably in the so-called '100 Days War', against Napoleon once more, culminating in the Battles of Quatre Bras and Waterloo. The sword knot or sword strap, sometimes called a tassel, is a lanyard—usually of leather but sometimes of woven gold or silver bullion, or more often metallic lace—looped around the hand to prevent the sword being lost if it is dropped. Although they have a practical function, sword knots often had a decorative design. In the Georgian era sword knots were made of silk with a fine, ornamental alloy gold or silver metal wire woven into it in a specified pattern. It would make a superb original accompaniment for any good British officer's sword from the Napoleonic Wars era

Code: 23594

445.00 GBP

Archived


SOLD A Simply Superb, Royal Naval Battle of Trafalgar Historical Junior Officer's Combat-Cum-Dress Sword

A light grade combat cum dress sword, with around 75% original mercurial gilt remaining, fullered blade engraved with wreaths, a stand of arms and a crowned GR cypher, with typical decorative scrolling and acanthus leaves. Finest copper gilt stirrup hilt, with junior rank dove's head pommel, with a pair of cast fouled anchor langets, wire bound chequered ebony grip [as often previously seen in the [circa 1786] five ball hilt naval officer's swords] Superb sword reputably of a Midshipman serving Nelson aboard HMS Victory at the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805. When this sword arrived with us it was exactly as can be seen now, not one minute of time was required to clean it. Its hilt has been stunningly well preserved these past 190 years since it was inherited. There were numerous midshipmen serving on Nelson's flagship, including Festing Horatio Grindall, who served in the navy before, during and subsequent to the battle, until he died one year after his brother in 1812. His father was Captain of HMS Prince at Trafalgar, later promoted after the battle to Rear Admiral of the Blue. Thanks to his long and favourable service record, Grindall was made a Rear Admiral of the White on 28 April 1808, of the Red on 25 October 1809 and Knight Commander of the Order of the Bath on 2 January 1815, in the general promotion which followed the action on 9 November. However, this meant the effective end of his
career, as so many admirals were created that not enough posts could be found for them. Grindall was one of the promoted men who never commanded at sea again, taking a shore appointment in late 1805 and retiring with his family soon afterwards as a Vice Admiral of the Blue on 31 July 1810, of the White on 12 August 1812, and of the Red on 4 June 1814. His retirement was a difficult one however, as two of his sons who had joined the navy in their father's footsteps, Edmund and Festing, died in 1811 and 1812 from unconnected illness. When Richard Grindall died in Wickham in 1820 he was interred next to them at St Nicholas Church, Wickham, Hampshire, joined by his wife Katherine in 1831. Katherine before her death had passed on both her son's junior officer's swords to her last remaining senior family member. The midshipman assisted the crew to carry Nelson below after his fatal wound, also present was great friend Capt. Hardy and his surgeon William Beatty. We were incredibly fortunate to acquire this sword due to the sword owner's family seeing our very similar, but senior officer's version, 1805 light pattern, combat-cum-dress sword on this site a few weeks ago [now sold]. The Battle of Trafalgar (21 October 1805) was a naval engagement fought by the Royal Navy against the combined fleets of the French and Spanish Navies, during the War of the Third Coalition (August?December 1805) of the Napoleonic Wars (1803?1815).

Twenty-seven British ships of the line led by Admiral Lord Nelson aboard HMS Victory defeated thirty-three French and Spanish ships of the line under the French Admiral Villeneuve in the Atlantic off the southwest coast of Spain, just west of Cape Trafalgar, in Ca?os de Meca. The Franco-Spanish fleet lost twenty-two ships, without a single British vessel being lost. It was the most decisive naval battle of the war, conclusively ending French plans to invade England.

The British victory spectacularly confirmed the naval supremacy that Britain had established during the eighteenth century and was achieved in part through Nelson's departure from the prevailing naval tactical orthodoxy. This involved engaging an enemy fleet in a single line of battle parallel to the enemy to facilitate signalling in battle and disengagement, and to maximise fields of fire and target areas. Nelson instead divided his smaller force into two columns directed perpendicularly against the enemy fleet, with decisive results.

Nelson was shot by a French musketeer during the battle and died shortly after, becoming one of Britain's greatest war heroes. Villeneuve was captured along with his ship Bucentaure. Admiral Federico Gravina, the senior Spanish flag officer, escaped with the remnant of the fleet and succumbed months later to wounds sustained during the battle. Villeneuve attended Nelson's funeral while a captive on parole in Britain. No scabbard surviving

Code: 23595

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SOLD A Beautiful Emperor of Ethiopia's Imperial Guard Cavalry Officer's Long Sword

Just returned from or workshop, after 40 hours of artisan bespoke cleaning and preservation. It is in such a fine state now it is likely one could never find a better surviving example. The sword is based on a British 1796 light cavalry pattern sword, but the hilt has a lion's head pommel, and a very distinctive grip that is either highly polished wood or gutta-percha. This is the pattern of sword that first saw service under Emperor Menelik II, who defeated an attempted Italian invasion of Ethiopia in 1896. Emperor Haillie selassie then ordered future contracts from the British such as Wilkinson sword co. A scarce Ethiopian Emperor's imperial guard cavalry sword. The Kebur Zebagya, or Honour Guard, also known as the Imperial Guard. Initially there were 3,000 men responsible to the head of state only. Numbers gradually increased. Selassie started it in 1917 when he was Regent for Empress Zewditu. He was made Emperor in 1930.

The Imperial Guard fought heroically during the second Italian war of 1935 -1941, and lost many men. The forces of Abyssinia became guerrilla after Selassie went into exile. He re-instated the Guard upon his return - he was exiled from 1936 to 1941. late 19th Century., Wide, curved, single-and false-edged blade, with fuller, nickel-plated, richly engraved with floral motifs and inscriptions in Amharic, and St George and the Dragon, and florid etching and engravings on the opposite side. European military type, metal and brass hilt, with guard and langets, anatomical grip and long cap shaped as lion's head. Original leather scabbard. The ricasso has a typical British star proof mark, stamped ZS under one langet, and on the opposite ricasso under the tang is an imperial crown. Selassie was one of the most famous leaders in Ethiopian history. As the emperor, he was exiled during the Italian occupation of Ethiopia due to the status he held. Selassie would go onto return to Ethiopia and help in taking back control of the country from Italy. On April 2, 1930, Ras Tafari Makonnen became Emperor Haile Selassie. Selassie was the last reigning monarch of Ethiopia’s Solomonic Dynasty. The Solomonic Dynasty traces its ancient ancestry to King Solomon of Israel and the Queen of Sheba, biblical figures who may have lived during the 10th century BCE.

Ethiopia is often acknowledged as the only nation in Africa never to have been colonized, and Selassie emerged as a powerful international figure as other African countries sought independence in the 20th century. His long reign and enduring policies (such as support for African unity and the abolition of slavery in Ethiopia) earned him a privileged position at international summits. For instance, Selassie was one of the highest-ranking diplomats at the funeral of U.S. President John Kennedy.

Selassie’s greatest impact may have been on the island of Jamaica. Jamaican religious leaders adopted a version of his birth name, Tafari (Ras was an official title) and Rastafarians regard Selassie as a god. (Selassie himself remained a Christian throughout his life.). Photo in the gallery of Emperor Hallie Selassie in full dress uniform.

Code: 23591

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A Very Good 1938 British Tommy Helmet, WW2 BEF Period and Issue

This is a very good, original,British Army WW2, steel 'Tommy' Combat helmet. This helmet has all of its original rough texture dark green finish & has no dents.There are no visible manufacturer codes but they may be present under the paint . The chin strap bales are both date stamped '1938' It has its original oil cloth sweat band liner & webbing and elastic chinstrap Used from the very earliest war period, through the Battle of France the Dunkirk evacuation, and right through the entire war. The Brodie helmet is a steel combat helmet designed and patented in London in 1915 by John Leopold Brodie. A modified form of it became the Helmet, Steel, Mark I in Britain and the M1917 Helmet in the U.S. Colloquially, it was called the shrapnel helmet, battle bowler, Tommy helmet, tin hat, and in the United States the doughboy helmet. It was also known as the dishpan hat, tin pan hat, washbasin, battle bowler (when worn by officers), and Kelly helmet. The German Army called it the Salatschüssel (salad bowl). The term Brodie is often misused. It is correctly applied only to the original 1915 Brodie's Steel Helmet, War Office Pattern. From 1936, the Mark I Brodie helmet was fitted with an improved liner and an elasticated (actually, sprung) webbing chin strap. This final variant served until late 1940, when it was superseded by the slightly modified Mk II, which served the British and Commonwealth forces throughout World War II.

Code: 23590

195.00 GBP

Archived


A Superb WW1 Royal Artillery Officer's Sword With Deluxe Etched Blade, in FS Scabbard

These swords were actually used in the trenches by the officers as can be seen in the photo in the gallery of two officers [one Horse Artillery the other Infantry] walking in France to the front, both with their swords within their Sam Browne frogs. Near mint blade with original frost etching, nickel three bar hilt and wire bound sharkskin grip. Fully etched blade with King George V th cypher and wings and lightning flashes of the Royal Artillery. Overall perfect for current service use [with two small issues attended to.] On 1 July 1899, the Royal Artillery was divided into three groups: the Royal Horse Artillery of 21 batteries and the Royal Field Artillery of 95 batteries comprised one group, while the coastal defence, mountain, siege and heavy batteries were split off into another group named the Royal Garrison Artillery of 91 companies. The third group continued to be titled simply Royal Artillery, and was responsible for ammunition storage and supply. Which branch a gunner belonged to was indicated by metal shoulder titles (R.A., R.F.A., R.H.A., or R.G.A.). The RFA and RHA also dressed as mounted men, whereas the RGA dressed like foot soldiers. In 1920 the rank of Bombardier was instituted in the Royal Artillery. The three sections effectively functioned as separate corps. This arrangement lasted until 1924, when the three amalgamated once more to became one regiment. In 1938, RA Brigades were renamed Regiments. During the Second World War there were over 1 million men serving in 960 gunner regiments. In 1947 the Riding House Troop RHA was renamed The King's Troop RHA and, in 1951, the title of the regiment's colonel-in-chief became Captain General. When The Queen first visited the Troop after her accession, it was expected that it would become "The Queen's Troop", but Her Majesty announced that in honour of her father's decision it would remain "The King's Troop".

The Royal Horse Artillery, which has always had separate traditions, uniforms and insignia, still retains a separate identity within the regiment.

Before the Second World War, Royal Artillery recruits were required to be at least 5 feet 4 inches (1.63 m) tall. Men in mechanised units had to be at least 5 feet 8 inches (1.73 m) tall. They initially enlisted for six years with the colours and a further six years with the reserve or four years and eight years. They trained at the Royal Artillery Depot in Woolwich. The FS leather covered wooden scabbard is very good except the bottom leather chape is lacking, a replacement shouldn't be too technical to find or make. **The hilt has some odd staining to the bars but should polish nicely.

Code: 23587

545.00 GBP

Archived


A WW2 Special Operations OSS Anti Personal and Vehicle Caltrop Spike

OSS "Christmas Tree" design. This is made from multiple pieces of stamped sheet metal. These were designed for use in soft ground or desert sand. the wide, flat, shape prevented it from sinking deeply into the ground and made sure that it punctured vehicle tyres even in soft ground. The OSS (Office of Strategic Services) was the WWII-era forerunner to today's CIA. The OSS proved especially useful in providing a worldwide overview of the German war effort, its strengths and weaknesses. In direct operations it was successful in supporting Operation Torch in French North Africa in 1942, where it identified pro-Allied potential supporters and located landing sites. OSS operations in neutral countries, especially Stockholm, Sweden, provided in-depth information on German advanced technology. The Madrid station set up agent networks in France that supported the Allied invasion of southern France in 1944. Most famous were the operations in Switzerland run by Allen Dulles that provided extensive information on German strength, air defences, submarine production, and the V-1 and V-2 weapons. It revealed some of the secret German efforts in chemical and biological warfare. Switzerland's station also supported resistance fighters in France and Italy, and helped with the surrender of German forces in Italy in 1945.

Code: 23584

110.00 GBP

Archived


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