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SOLD A Superb 1822 Pattern French Light Cavalry Sabre, In Near Mint Condition.

SOLD A Superb 1822 Pattern French Light Cavalry Sabre, In Near Mint Condition.

It would likely be impossible to ever see a better example. This Light Cavalry 1822 Pattern was carried by all French light cavalry, Horse Chasseurs, Hussars, Lancers, Horse Artillery, Spahis, Goumiers and used in all campaigns from the Mexican expeditions to the Crimean wars, the colonial wars in North Africa and WW1, for more than 100 years. On January 18, 1822, the Committee of cavalry decided unanimously in favour of a curved sword for the entire Light Cavalry, using a Montmorency type blade.The curved blade has a wide fuller on each side to within 160 mm from the point and a thin 550 mm fuller on each side near the back edge which is engraved Manu. d'Armes de Chattll Avril 1876 = Cavalerie Mle 1822. Also used in WW1.The charge of the French Light Cavalry against the Germans on the road to Lassigny (a village between Montvidier and Noyon in France) during World War One in 1914. No scabbard, in combat use it has received a tiny impact on its tip

Code: 23978

395.00 GBP

Archived


SOLD An Original French 1833 Gladius Combat  Short Sword

SOLD An Original French 1833 Gladius Combat Short Sword

French Model 1831 Infantry Gladius Short Sword. Chatellerault 1832. Pihet Freres Mid 19th C French artillery gladius type sword with 19 inch blade engraved Chatelleraeult 1833. This pattern of Gladius is named after its direct original version, the ancient Roman sword used by the Roman Empire for hundreds of years.however this gladius was made and used in France from the 1830's till the 1850's up to the crimean war against Russia. After the war many French gladius were sold in the early 1860's to the USA in order to supply their desperate need for arms for the Civil War. The US in fact found this pattern sword so effective it was directly copied by America. They copied their French gladius sword, and made their own slightly different version, with an Eagle decorated pommel for use by the US foot. The Pihet brothers were private contractors who cast the hilt and then assembled the sword using a blade made by the Government armoury at Chatellerault. This form of stout sword was incredibly efficient at close quarter combat, in fact the Romans discovered so and used it for centuries, and it's power and effectiveness, when used by well trained legionaries and gladiators, was never bettered for almost 2000 years.This very French sword type appears, and is illustrated, in 'American Swords and Maker's Marks' by Clegg Donald Furr, as the US Civil War imported short sword. In fact many are still unaware it is a French made sword, as it has been [quite wrongly] frequently attributed as an American sword, by some, for many decades. We show this sword in totally 'sleeper' condition as it has remained untouched for likely over 100 years. No scabbard

Code: 23973

295.00 GBP

Archived


British Army Ghurkha Service Kukri, Combat /Jungle Service Gulf War Period “Better to Die Than Be a Coward” is the Motto of these World-Famous Soldiers

British Army Ghurkha Service Kukri, Combat /Jungle Service Gulf War Period “Better to Die Than Be a Coward” is the Motto of these World-Famous Soldiers

Given as a gift from a Ghurkha regiment Service. A no.2 kukri is a training, exercise, and combat knife. it is a field knife for the soldiers. It is worn in no.2 dress or also known as the combat/jungle uniform. Service no.2 kukri sees a lot of cutting, hacking, slicing, etc as expected by any knife. Some also take it to battle fields should the need be.Gurkha soldiers in an SAS unit reportedly took Islamic State gunmen captive after threatening to behead them with their famous kukri knives.

Up to a dozen gunmen are believed to have been captured when a British special forces team raided a terrorist “safe house” in Syria.

The team, which contained four Gurkha soldiers, had been told to capture the Islamic State fighters alive. After approaching their hideout, an interpreter told the men inside to surrender.

But when they refused, the Gurkhas emerged and brandished their renowned curved kukri knives,

The interpreter is then said to have shouted: "These four men are members of the Gurkhas. They come from the hills of Nepal."They are famous warriors who do not fear death. If they have to come in to get you they will behead you with their curved knives."

A defence source said the windows in one of the buildings soon opened and the gunmen hurled out their weapons. This is arguably the toughest soldier in the world .
Hailing from the mountainous region of Nepal, the Gurkhas were first witnessed by the world when they were invaded over 200 years ago by the British East India Company. Suffering immense casualties, the British forces were eager to sign a hasty peace treaty. A soldier even noted in his memoirs: “I never saw more steadiness or bravery exhibited in my life. Run they would not, and of death they seemed to have no fear."According to the peace treaty's terms, the Gurkhas were allowed to join the East India Company's army. Since then, more than 200,000 Gurkhas fought in virtually every military campaign — the World Wars, Afghanistan, and even the brief 1982 Falklands War. The Gurkhas' eagerness for battle comes at a cost, however — 43,000 of them died during WWI and WWII. Although they have suffered heavy losses, their heroic actions haven't gone unnoticed. The UK's highest award for military bravery, valour and gallantry, the Victoria Cross, has only has only ever been awarded, during the past 170 years, around 1350 times. It is likely the most difficult to qualify for, the most highly prized, and the most respected and valuable medal in the world. An incredible 26 have been awarded to servicemen in the Gurkha Regiments.

Code: 23972

185.00 GBP

Archived


A Fabulous and Rare Early 19th Century King George IIIrd Explosive 10

A Fabulous and Rare Early 19th Century King George IIIrd Explosive 10" Mortar Bomb Shell From the War of 1812 In America. .

Fired by the 10" mortars used by Admiral Cochrane against Fort McHenry, Baltimore Harbour, and the resulting 10" mortar bomb shell's mid air explosions, against the backdrop of the US flag flying at Fort McHenry, inspired the patriotic anthem, the "Star Spangled Banner".
It was the sight of these very 10" mortar bombshells [that weighed around 90 pounds each] and that when they exploded it inspired Francis Scott Key to write his poem that became the US anthem. Naturally, this is a perfectly intact surviving example, and one of the 10" mortar shells that either wasn't fired, or, failed to explode.
With Washington in ruins, the British next set their sights on Baltimore, then America’s third-largest city. Moving up the Chesapeake Bay to the mouth of the Patapsco River, they plotted a joint attack on Baltimore by land and water. On the morning of September 12, General Ross’s troops landed at North Point, Maryland, and progressed towards the city. They soon encountered the American forward line, part of an extensive network of defences established around Baltimore in anticipation of the British assault. During the skirmish with American troops, General Ross, so successful in the attack on Washington, was killed by a sharpshooter. Surprised by the strength of the American defences, British forces camped on the battlefield and waited for nightfall on September 13, planning to attempt another attack under cover of darkness.

Meanwhile, Britain’s naval force, buoyed by its earlier successful attack on Alexandria, Virginia, was poised to strike Fort McHenry and enter Baltimore Harbour. At 6:30 AM on September 13, 1814, Admiral Cochrane’s ships began a 25-hour bombardment of the fort. Rockets whistled through the air and burst into flame wherever they struck. Mortars fired 10- and 13-inch bombshells that exploded overhead in showers of fiery shrapnel. It is said many exploded to soon as the fuses were set to short, which created the firework effect. Major Armistead, commander of Fort McHenry and its defending force of one thousand troops, ordered his men to return fire, but their guns couldn’t reach the enemy’s ships. When British ships advanced on the afternoon of the 13th, however, American gunners badly damaged them, forcing them to pull back out of range. All through the night, Armistead’s men continued to hold the fort, refusing to surrender. That night British attempts at a diversionary attack also failed, and by dawn they had given up hope of taking the city. At 7:30 on the morning of September 14, Admiral Cochrane called an end to the bombardment, and the British fleet withdrew. The successful defense of Baltimore marked a turning point in the War of 1812. Three months later, on December 24, 1814, the Treaty of Ghent formally ended the war. "The Star-Spangled Banner" is the national anthem of the United States. The lyrics come from the "Defence of Fort M'Henry", a poem written on September 14, 1814, by 35-year-old lawyer and amateur poet Francis Scott Key after witnessing the bombardment of Fort McHenry by British ships of the Royal Navy in Baltimore Harbor during the Battle of Baltimore in the War of 1812. Key was inspired by the large U.S. flag, with 15 stars and 15 stripes, known as the Star-Spangled Banner, flying triumphantly above the fort during the U.S. victory. During the bombardment, HMS Terror and HMS Meteor provided some of the "bombs bursting in air".


The 15-star, 15-stripe "Star-Spangled Banner" that inspired the poem
Key was inspired by the U.S. victory and the sight of the large U.S. flag flying triumphantly above the fort. This flag, with fifteen stars and fifteen stripes, had been made by Mary Young Pickersgill together with other workers in her home on Baltimore's Pratt Street. The flag later came to be known as the Star-Spangled Banner, and is today on display in the National Museum of American History, a treasure of the Smithsonian Institution. It was restored in 1914 by Amelia Fowler, and again in 1998 as part of an ongoing conservation program. Pictures in the gallery of the siege from contemporary paintings and engravings, a commemorative stamp issued in 2014, and an original War of 1812 bronze British mortar now kept at Yorktown Visitor Centre. Empty, inert and completely safe. Seated on an old iron ring for safe display

Code: 23967

1550.00 GBP

Archived


A Superb Imperial Roman Ring, Bearing Ancient Greek Inscription, Psixa Kali , Which Translates to 'Good Soul'

A Superb Imperial Roman Ring, Bearing Ancient Greek Inscription, Psixa Kali , Which Translates to 'Good Soul'

1st- 4th Century in copper bronze with superb natural age patination in excellent condition and great clarity to the hand inscription. In the classical world, the use of the Greek and Latin alphabets, derived originally from Phoenician characters, has been taken to be much more functional, and it is the reading of the surviving texts that has been regarded as all-important. There are many more extant examples of Roman inscriptions than earlier Greek and Hellenistic ones, but not all Roman inscriptions are in Latin. In fact, probably as many Roman inscriptions are in Greek as in Latin, for Greek was the common language in the eastern half of the empire.
The connection between the soul and characteristics like boldness and courage in battle is plainly an aspect of the noteworthy fifth century b.c. development whereby the soul comes to be thought of as the source or bearer of moral qualities such as, for instance, temperance and justice. In Pericles' funeral oration that Thucydides includes in his account of the Peloponnesian War, he says that those who know most clearly the sweet and the terrible, and yet do not as a result turn away from danger, are rightly judged “strongest with regard to soul”. This text, and others like it such as Herodotus, indicate a semantic extension whereby ‘soul’ comes to denote a person's moral character, often, but not always, with special regard to qualities such as endurance and courage.
The complete Roman Empire had around a 60 million population and a census more perfect than many parts of the world (to collect taxes, of course) but identification was still quite difficult and aggravated even more because there were a maximum of 17 men names and the women received the name of the family in feminine and a number (Prima for First, Secunda for Second…). A lot of people had the same exact name.
So the Roman proved the citizenship by inscribing themselves (or the slaves when they freed them) in the census, usually accompanied with two witnesses. Roman inscribed in the census were citizens and used an iron or bronze ring to prove it. With Augustus, those that could prove a wealth of more than 400,000 sesterces were part of a privileged class called Equites (knights) that came from the original nobles that could afford a horse. The Equites were middle-high class and wore a bronze or gold ring to prove it, with the famous Angusticlavia (a tunic with an expensive red-purple twin line). Senators (those with a wealth of more than 1,000,000 sesterces) also used the gold ring and the Laticlave, a broad band of purple in the tunic.

So the rings were very important to tell from a glimpse of eye if a traveller was a citizen, an equites or a senator, or legionary. People sealed and signed letters with the rings and its falsification could bring death.
The fugitive slaves didn’t have rings but iron collars with texts like “If found, return me to X” which also helped to recognise them. The domesticus slaves (the ones that lived in houses) didn’t wore the collar but sometimes were marked. A ring discovered 50 years ago is now believed to possibly be the ring of Pontius Pilate himself, and it was the same copper-bronze form ring as is this one. It comes within a complimentary box, but not exactly as the one shown.
The ring is 2 cm across.

Code: 23964

545.00 GBP

Archived


A Super 1930's Stag Handled Combat/Hunting Bowie Knife by J.A.Henckels Zwillingswerk

A Super 1930's Stag Handled Combat/Hunting Bowie Knife by J.A.Henckels Zwillingswerk

This is a model 4760 which was shown in their 1922 catalogue. The knife has a good stag handle and a clipped back Bowie blade. Henckels' bowie-style knives are seldom available and are prized for their quality and fine old-world German craftsmanship. In original leather scabbard with stud button crossover retaining strap, and metal chape. overall in very good condition, blade very sharp. maker marked blade, with company dancing men logo . Ironically with the successful reach of its maker having contracts for Berlin, America and Britain before the war, this kind of combat knife could be just as likely found on a Tommy, GI, or Herman during WW2, although not that many have survived the war period. J. A. Henckels opened the first trading outlet in 1818 in Berlin, opening a shop in New York City in 1883 and followed a year later by Vienna. The company exhibited its products at the 1851 Great Exhibition at the Crystal Palace in Great Britain, being awarded an international knifesmithing medal

J. A. Henckels was awarded the Grand Prix prize in Paris in 1900 and the Grand Prix of St. Louis in 1904. It was also awarded with the Prussian State Golden Medal. Henckels was also given a royal warrant of appointment as purveyors of knives to the Imperial and Royal Court of Austria-Hungary.

Knife overall approx 10" long in scabbard.

Code: 23954

325.00 GBP

Archived


A Superb WW2 Ghurkha's Kukri Combat Knife

A Superb WW2 Ghurkha's Kukri Combat Knife "Ayo Gorkali" The Gurkha Battle Call "The Gurkhas Are Coming!" Field Marshall Manekshaw once said, " If someone says he does not fear death, then he is either telling a lie or he is a Gurkha".

The Gukhas are probably the finest and bravest, combat soldiers in the world, and universally agreed as the most feared, with legendary loyalty to the British Crown. In traditional military type brown leather over wood scabbard. When worn in combat it would normally be in a khaki canvas cover. With traditional accessories of sharpening tool and small utility/skinning knife, both with matching horn hilts. Superb tempered steel blade and deluxe quality carved horn hilt with bi-metal pommel cap, overall in fabulous condition. Field Marshall Sam Manekshaw once said, " If someone says he does not fear death, then he is either telling a lie or he is a Gurkha". On 12/13 May 1945 at Taungdaw, Burma now Myanmar, Rifleman Lachhiman Gurung VC was manning the most forward post of his platoon which bore the brunt of an attack by at least 200 of the Japanese enemy. Twice he hurled back grenades which had fallen on his trench, but the third exploded in his right hand, blowing off his fingers, shattering his arm and severely wounding him in the face, body and right leg. His two comrades were also badly wounded but the rifleman, now alone and disregarding his wounds, loaded and fired his rifle with his left hand for four hours, calmly waiting for each attack which he met with fire at point blank range. Afterwards, when the casualties were counted, it is reported that there were 31 dead Japanese around his position which he had killed, with only one arm.In the Falklands War in 1982 the Argentinians abandoned Mount William without a fight simply because the enemy forces advancing towards them were the 2nd Battalion, 7th Ghurka Rifles. The blade shape descended from the classic Greek sword of Kopis, which is about 2500 years old. The Kukri is the renown and famous weapon of the Nepalese Gurkha. Probably the most respected and feared warriors in the world, the Gurkhas of Nepal have fought in the Gurkha regiments of the British Army for around two centuries. With a degree of loyalty and dedication that is legendary, there is no greater soldier to be at one's side when in battle than the noble Gurkha. With a Kukri in his hand and the battle cry called, "Ayo Gorkhali!" "the Gurkhas are coming!", no foe's head was safe on his shoulders. Battle hardened German Infantry in WW1, or in WW2, the notorious Japanese Shock Troops, have both been known to tremble in their boots at the knowledge that they would be facing the Gurkhas in battle. Some of the most amazing feats of heroism have resulted in the most revered medal, the British Victoria Cross the world's greatest and most difficult to qualify for gallantry medal being awarded to Ghurkas.
Some say it originated from a form of knife first used by the Mallas who came to power in Nepal in the 13th Century. There are some Khukuris displaying on the walls of National Museum at Chhauni in Kathmandu which are 500 years old or even older, among them, one that once belonged to Drabya Shah, the founder king of the kingdom of Gorkha, in 1627 AD. But, some say that the Khukuri's history is possibly centuries older this. It is suggested that the Khukuri was first used by Kiratis who came to power in Nepal before Lichchhavi age, in about the 7th Century. In the hands of an experienced wielder Khukuri or Kukri is about as formidable a weapon as can be conceived. Like all really good weapons, Khukuri's or Kukri's efficiency depends much more upon skill than the strength of the wielder. And thus so that it happens, that a diminutive Gurkha, a mere boy in regards to his stature, could easily cut to pieces a gigantic adversary, who simply does not understand the little Gurkha's mode of attack and fearsome skill. The Gurkha generally strikes upwards with his Kukri, possibly in order to avoid wounding himself should his blow fail, and possibly because an upward cut is just the one that can be least guarded against however strong his opponent. 16.5 inches long overall in scabbard,

Code: 23955

385.00 GBP

Archived


An Extremely Good, Original, WW1 Imperial German Ern Wald Rheinl, Rasiermesser Fabrik Imperial German WW1 Fighting/Trench Knife

An Extremely Good, Original, WW1 Imperial German Ern Wald Rheinl, Rasiermesser Fabrik Imperial German WW1 Fighting/Trench Knife

It would probably be impossible to find a better condition example. A WW1 era German Army ERN Wald Rheinl Kampfmesser (combat knife) trench dagger/knife in original scabbard, with all original black paint, and in excellent condition for age, the blade still having much original issue polishing crossgrain. The grips are secured with three rivets evenly spaced. There is a manufacturer stamp on the ricasso "ERN Wald, Rheinl" on one side and good stamp "Rasiermesser Fabrik" on the reverse. It is complete with its original metal scabbard painted black which has a leather belt loop riveted to it. German war ministry order of 23 may 1915 confirmed the issuing of 6 pistols and 6 trench knives for each infantry company which doubled 29 February 1916 to 12 knives, and then a maximum of 40 in 1917, for Infantry and Minenwerfer companies, and on the Eastern Front the order was for 36 per company. A photo in the gallery shows a storm trooper group, Sturm-Gruppe, 8th Bat. 1/223, many with their war ministry issue close combat trench knives such as this one. After the early war of movement in the late summer of 1914, artillery and machine guns forced the armies on the Western Front to dig trenches to protect themselves. Fighting ground to a stalemate. Over the next four years, both sides would launch attacks against the enemy’s trench lines, attacks that resulted in horrific casualties.Inside a trench, all that is visible is just a few feet on either side, ending at the trench walls in front and back, with a patch of leaden sky visible above. Trenches in WWI were constructed with sandbags, wooden planks, woven sticks, tangled barbed wire or even just stinking mud.
‘No-man’s land,’ was an ancient term that gained terrible new meaning during WWI. The constant bombardment of modern artillery and rapid firing of machine guns created a nightmarish wasteland between the enemies’ lines, littered with tree stumps and snarls of barbed wire. In battle, soldiers had to charge out of the trenches and across no-man’s land into a hail of bullets and shrapnel and poison gas. They were easy targets and casualties were enormously high. By the end of 1914, after just five months of fighting, the number of dead and wounded exceeded four million men.
German officers and non-commissioned officers (NCOs) began experimenting with new assault tactics immediately after the army entered the trenches. In March 1915, an experimental unit called the Sturmabteilung (enlarged to a Sturmbataillon in April 1916) was founded to centralize the process. The Sturmabteilung developed a procedure called “infiltration tactics”. Storm troopers (Sturmtruppen) were organized in very small groups which were flexible enough to cross the no-man's-land quickly. Instead of attacking the enemy trenches over the whole width, they only assaulted key points, entered the trenches and then fought their way inside and alongside the trenches. Instead of surging against the trenches like a wave, the storm troops opened holes and flowed through the trench system. For that, the storm troopers needed massive firepower. They did not rely on the rifle but specialized in close range weapons such as hand grenades, pistols, light mortars, machine guns, knives, bayonets and spades.

Speed was key. The scattered, but massive and quickly spreading assaults were supposed to create shock, confusion and fear among the enemy. Keeping up the pace was imperative. If an enemy section was not immediately overwhelmed, it was isolated and kept in check by just a few storm troopers, then left behind for the regular infantry. Meanwhile, the majority of the storm troopers continued attacking, in order to exploit the enemy's confusion for as long as possible. These tactics demanded independence, prudence and resourcefulness from soldiers on all levels, since direct control by officers was neither possible nor reasonable in such a chaotic style of fighting.
The trench systems on the Western Front were roughly 475 miles long, stretching from the English Channel to the Swiss Alps, although not in a continuous line. Though trenches offered some protection, they were still incredibly dangerous, as soldiers easily became trapped or killed because of direct hits from artillery fire.

Code: 23951

Price
on
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27 Swords and Yari, an  Antique and Ancient Samurai Sword Collection Arrived Today

27 Swords and Yari, an Antique and Ancient Samurai Sword Collection Arrived Today

Although, 12 of them that have already been shown and offered online by us and have now been already sold. One, in fact, is returning to Japan, to reside in a Tokyo based private museum of the family of a well known Japanese car manufacturer.
The remaining swords have been catalogued with a few still to add, photographing and detailing
Swords from 14th century to the 19th century, Koto to Edo period, including by makers such as Izumi kami Kanesada, Minamoto Masatoshi [a student of Masahide], Kunetoshi circa 1380, Norimitsu circa 1480, Hisatoshi, Norishige, Kazunori and Mitsutada

Code: 23928

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on
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A Delightful & Beautiful Edo Period 1598-1863 Samurai War Arrow. A Tagari-Ya

A Delightful & Beautiful Edo Period 1598-1863 Samurai War Arrow. A Tagari-Ya

With original traditional raptorial feathers, probably the large edge-wing feathers of a Japanese sea eagle. The arrow tip is a traditional tamagahane steel hand made long arrow head, with folding and tempering exactly as would be a samurai sword blade, possibly signed on the tang under the binding but we would never remove it to see. The Togari-Ya or pointed arrowheads look like a small Yari (spear) and were used only for war and are armour piercing arrows . Despite being somewhat of a weapon that was 'fire and forget' it was created regardless of cost and time, like no other arrow ever was outside of Japan. For example, to create the arrow head alone, in the very same traditional way today, using tamahagane steel, folding and forging, water quench tempering, then followed by polishing, it would likely cost way in excess of a thousand pounds, that is if you could find a Japanese master sword smith today who would make one for you. Then would would need hafting, binding, and feathering, by a completely separate artisan, and finally, using eagle feathers as flights, would be very likely impossible. This is a simple example of how incredible value finest samurai weaponry can be, items that can be acquired from us that would cost many times the price of our original antiques in order to recreate today. Kyu Jutsu is the art of Japanese archery.The beginning of archery in Japan is pre-historical. The first images picturing the distinct Japanese asymmetrical longbow are from the Yayoi period (c. 500 BC – 300 AD).
The changing of society and the military class (samurai) taking power at the end of the first millennium created a requirement for education in archery. This led to the birth of the first kyujutsu ryūha (style), the Henmi-ryū, founded by Henmi Kiyomitsu in the 12th century. The Takeda-ryū and the mounted archery school Ogasawara-ryū were later founded by his descendants. The need for archers grew dramatically during the Genpei War (1180–1185) and as a result the founder of the Ogasawara-ryū (Ogasawara Nagakiyo), began teaching yabusame (mounted archery) In the twelfth and thirteenth century a bow was the primary weapon of a warrior on the battlefield. Bow on the battlefield stopped dominating only after the appearance of firearm.The beginning of archery in Japan is pre-historical. The first images picturing the distinct Japanese asymmetrical longbow are from the Yayoi period (c. 500 BC – 300 AD).
The changing of society and the military class (samurai) taking power at the end of the first millennium created a requirement for education in archery. This led to the birth of the first kyujutsu ryūha (style), the Henmi-ryū, founded by Henmi Kiyomitsu in the 12th century. The Takeda-ryū and the mounted archery school Ogasawara-ryū were later founded by his descendants. The need for archers grew dramatically during the Genpei War (1180–1185) and as a result the founder of the Ogasawara-ryū (Ogasawara Nagakiyo), began teaching yabusame (mounted archery) Warriors practiced several types of archery, according to changes in weaponry and the role of the military in different periods. Mounted archery, also known as military archery, was the most prized of warrior skills and was practiced consistently by professional soldiers from the outset in Japan. Different procedures were followed that distinguished archery intended as warrior training from contests or religious practices in which form and formality were of primary importance. Civil archery entailed shooting from a standing position, and emphasis was placed upon form rather than meeting a target accurately. By far the most common type of archery in Japan, civil or civilian archery contests did not provide sufficient preparation for battle, and remained largely ceremonial. By contrast, military training entailed mounted maneuvers in which infantry troops with bow and arrow supported equestrian archers. Mock battles were staged, sometimes as a show of force to dissuade enemy forces from attacking. While early medieval warfare often began with a formalized archery contest between commanders, deployment of firearms and the constant warfare of the 15th and 16th centuries ultimately led to the decline of archery in battle. In the Edo period archery was considered an art, and members of the warrior classes participated in archery contests that venerated this technique as the most favoured weapon of the samurai. The last photo in the gallery is not this arrowhead, but it shows how long the arrow head tang would be.

38 inches long

Code: 23916

450.00 GBP

Archived


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