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Adolf Hitler's Mein Kampf. Presentation 1938 Wedding Issue.

Presentation copy, in marbled ivory and blue leather, with the city crest in gold embossed thereon, but unusually never awarded, so the presentation page is not completed or signed. A most scarce original copy, but without its handwritten dedication to the recipients, to be presented by the unnamed city Burgermeister for a traditional Nazi wedding, signed with Adolf Hitler's facsimile signature. Wedding editions were specially made bindings in blue half leather and were imprinted with the City State's symbol. SS couples were given a copy within a wooden casket carved with sigrunen SS upon the lid. This copy's box is no longer existing. It would have a special printed page inside with a space for the handwritten newlyweds names, date, and signature from the Burgomeister or Mayor who was presenting it to the new couple as a wedding gift from the Fuhrer and state. Mein Kampf ("My Struggle") is an autobiographical manifesto by Nazi leader Adolf Hitler, in which he outlines his political ideology and future plans for Germany. Volume 1 of Mein Kampf was published in 1925 and Volume 2 in 1926. The book was edited by the former Hieronymite friar Bernhard Stempfle, who was murdered during the Night of the Long Knives.

Hitler began dictating the book to his deputy Rudolf Hess while imprisoned for what he considered to be "political crimes" following his failed Putsch in Munich in November 1923. Although Hitler received many visitors initially, he soon devoted himself entirely to the book. As he continued, Hitler realized that it would have to be a two-volume work, with the first volume scheduled for release in early 1925. The governor of Landsberg noted at the time that "he [Hitler] hopes the book will run into many editions, thus enabling him to fulfill his financial obligations and to defray the expenses incurred at the time of his trial." It is an intriguing premise that it is possible this very book may well have been instrumental in the cause of Hitler’s dominance over Europe potentially the war itself.

It was only because this book became the world best seller that the income from it was used by Hitler to fund his political ambitions and many of his political meetings in the early 1930s.

It is a Sobering thought to believe that a book can have such a significant part in world history. Some books obviously become very much for the good of mankind, others not so. Alongside Das Kapital by Karl Marx it is nonetheless true that it places these books amongst the most significant ever written and published in the 580 year history of the printed word.

Code: 23365

350.00 GBP

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Original British Officer's Combat Sword Crimean War to Zulu War Period Use

Circa 1850. Fine fully etched bright steel blade, gothic open pierced VR cypher hilt with wire bound sharkskin covered grip, bright polished steel combat scabbard. A super example, that would compliment any fine collection of antique arms, and this is exactly the same form and pattern of sword as was used and worn by Lt Bromhead VC at Rorke's Drift, including its steel combat scabbard, during the Zulu War of 1879. See the publicity promotion photo of Sir Micheal Caine as Bromhead in ZULU, with his identical sword. On the morning of 22 Jan 1879, some 20,000 Zulu warriors attacked a British invading army. They carried spears and clubs; the British were armed with modern rifles and two heavy guns.

But the Zulu commander, Ntshingwayo, deserves to be remembered as one of the greatest generals in African history. First he used a masterly deception plan to lure Lord Chelmsford, the British commander, and 3,000 troops away from their main camp at the foot of Mount Isandlwana and send them on a wild goose chase across the plains.

Then Ntshingwayo opened a massive attack on the weakened British force left in the camp. He deployed his warriors in a classic "buffalo horns" formation. The left horn broke through the British firing line, while the right swept around behind Isandlwana and occupied the supply depot and ox-wagon train. They separated the British from their ammunition supply and also stampeded their oxen, sending about 4,500 animals careering across the veldt.

In the ensuing chaos, the British were overwhelmed and cut to pieces. Of 1,774 British and African troops in the camp, only 55 survived. Some 14 British soldiers, led by Capt Reginald Younghusband of the 24th Foot, made a last stand on the slopes of the mountain. Zulu sources record that the men shook hands before making a final bayonet charge.

Code: 23363

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November 11th Remembrance Sunday.

It is important to remember that great heroes have lives that matter beyond their valorous deeds.
There was another poem regarding the nobility of the British soldier in the Crimean War, apart from the incredible and world renown "Charge of the Light Brigade", it is a lot less famous, but likely more important than the first, which was written by Alfred Lord Tennyson, but this time it was written by Rudyard Kipling ;

"The Last of the Light Brigade" (April 28, 1890, St. James’ Gazette)

There were thirty million English who talked of England’s might, There were twenty broken troopers who lacked a bed for the night.
They had neither food nor money, they had neither service nor trade; They were only shiftless soldiers, the last of the Light Brigade.
They felt that life was fleeting; they knew not that art was long, That though they were dying of famine, they lived in deathless song.
They asked for a little money to keep the wolf from the door; And the thirty million English sent twenty pounds and four!
They laid their heads together that were scarred and lined and grey; Keen were the Russian sabres, but want was keener than they; And an old Troop-Sergeant muttered, "Let us go to the man who writes The things on Balaclava the kiddies at school recites".
They went without bands or colours, a regiment ten-file strong, To look for the Master-singer who had crowned them all in his song; And, waiting his servant’s order, by the garden gate they stayed, A desolate little cluster, the last of the Light Brigade.

They strove to stand to attention, to straighten the toil-bowed back; They drilled on an empty stomach, the loose-knit files fell slack; With stooping of weary shoulders, in garments tattered and frayed, They shambled into his presence, the last of the Light Brigade.
The old Troop-Sergeant was spokesman, "and Beggin your pardon", he said, "You wrote o’ the Light Brigade, sir. Here’s all that isn’t dead. An it’s all come true what you wrote, sir, regardin the mouth of hell; For we’re all of us nigh to the workhouse, an, we thought we’d call an’ tell.
No, thank you, we don’t want food, sir; but couldn’t you take an’ write 'A sort of, to be continued, and see next page o’ the fight.'
We think that someone has blundered, an’ couldn’t you tell em how, You wrote we were heroes once, sir. Please, write we are starving now."

The poor little army departed, limping and lean and forlorn. And the heart of the Master-singer grew hot with the scorn of scorn. And he wrote for them wonderful verses that swept the land like flame, Till the fatted souls of the English were scourged with the thing called Shame.
"O thirty million English that babble of England’s might, Behold there are twenty heroes who lack their food to-night; Our children’s children are lisping to honour the charge they made- And we leave to the streets and the workhouse the charge of the Light Brigade!." .
.
It is believed by some today that Rudyard Kipling was a relic of Empire, but by ten thousand times more he is remembered as one of Britain's greatest writers,... but, in our opinion, he was far more important that just that. The picture in the gallery is of a British soldier in the Boer War by Caton Woodville from another great poem by Kipling, 'The Absent-Minded Beggar', of 1899. It was written to help raise money for the dependents of soldiers fighting in the Boer War (1899-1902). The fund, known as the 'Absent Minded Beggar Relief Corps', eventually raised about £250,000.

Code: 23359

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A German WW2 Teller Mine.

RESERVED A very scarce anti tank mine, with trip wire fuze aperture, but adaptable through a detonator variation for heavy vehicles or as an anti personnel mine. This is an all sealed war version that now is especially rare to see. The Tellermine (or T-mine) was a German antitank mine developed between the wars. The Tellermine 29 was a round metal-cased antitank blast mine. It first entered service in 1929. Although replaced by later models, this model did see limited service, notably after D-Day in France, where Allied troops reported encountering it. The mine used a pressure or a trip wire fuse. The Tellermine was designed with a circular casing rising toward the centre. A rectangular metal carrying handle was fitted to the side of the mine. The pressure plate sat over the fuse well. At the bottom of the fuse well was a booster charge, surrounded by a doughnut- shaped main charge of 5.5 kilograms of TNT or Amatol. The mine had secondary fuse wells on the side and base to enable anti-handling devices to be fitted. Additionally, it could be fitted with an anti-tampering device, detonating the mine if the pressure plate was lifted. The mine could also be fitted with a tilt rod fuse, screwed into to the side fuse well. Inert and safe.

Code: 23358

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A Very Good Napoleonic Wars Period Light Company Tower of London Musket

With excellent walnut stock good traditional lock with ring neck cock [post 1803]. Lock face tail stamped Tower, with ordnance crown stamp, and feint traces of GR crown, with rear site and bayonet bar similar to the Baker rifle bayonet bar. The lock has a very crisp and tight action. Used in the Napoleonic Wars era, in the empire and although bearing the Baker rifle style bayonet bar the barrel is smooth bore, not rifled. French Genaral Foy writes: "The infantry is the best portion of the British army. ... The infantry, when in active service, is distributed into brigades of 2, 3 and even 4 regiments, according to the number and strength of the battalions. The grenadiers are not distinguished among the other soldiers for the eclat and pre-eminence so striking in the French and Hungarian grenadiers; and it is not customary to unite them into separate corps, in order to attempt bold strokes.
The light companies of different regiments are sometimes formed into provisional battalions, - a practice directly in opposition to the purpose for which that species of troops was originally intended.
Several regiments of the line, such as the 43rd, the 51st, the 52nd etc., are called light infantry regiments. These corps, as well as the light companies of the battalions, have nothing light about them but the name; for they are armed and with some slight change in the decorations, clothed like the rest of the infantry.
It was considered that the English soldier did not possess sufficient intelligence and address to combine with the regular duty of the line the service of inspiration of the sharpshooter. When the necessity of a specialist light infantry began to be felt, the best marksmen of different corps were at first selected; but it was afterwards found expedient to devote exclusively to the office of sharpshooters the 8 battalions of the 60th, the 3 of the 95th Rifles, and some of the foreign corps. The musket has a 33 inch barrel, and is 49.25 inches long overall

Code: 23356

1850.00 GBP

Archived


A 19th 'Colt Brevet' 1849 Pattern 31 Cal. Pocket Revolver

A 19th century patent infringement revolver, a very interesting Civil War and Wild West period Colt copy revolver, Serial number stamped on the underneath 18678. Non operational, needs attention, but an old antique revolver of the Civil War period. Cylinder proof stamped. The term "Brevete" could, at the time, apply to any revolver made under license by Colt patents in Europe.The family of Colt Pocket Percussion Revolvers evolved from the earlier commercial revolvers marketed by the Patent Arms Manufacturing Company of Paterson, NJ. The smaller versions of Colt's first revolvers are also called "Baby Patersons" by collectors and were produced in .24 to .31 calibres. The .31 calibre carried over into Samuel Colt's second venture in the arms trade in the form of the "Baby Dragoon"-a small revolver developed in 1847–48. The "Baby Dragoon" was in parallel development with Colt's other revolvers and, by 1850, it had evolved into the Revolving Pocket Pistol that collectors now name "The Pocket Model of 1849. It is a smaller version of the "Revolving Belt Pistol of Naval Calibre" introduced the same year and commonly designated by collectors as the "1851 Navy". In 1855 Colt introduced another pocket percussion revolver, the Colt 1855 Sidehammer, designed alongside engineer Elisha K. Root. One legend has it that the pocket models were popular with Civil War officers who did not rely on them as combat arms but as defence against battlefield surgeons bent on amputating a limb. Renown 19th century British explorer, cartographer, linguist and spy, Richard Francis Burton was a devotee of Colt Revolvers and carried a selection of them on his mid-eastern journeys including the trip to Somalia and Ethiopia in 1855. A Pocket model receives prominent mention: "My revolvers excited abundant attention, though none would be persuaded to touch them. The largest, which fitted with a stock became an excellent carbine, was at once named Abu Sittah (the Father of Six) and the Shaytan or Devil: the pocket pistol became the Malunah or Accursed, and the distance to which it carried ball made every man wonder" Burton was a captain in the army of the East India Company, serving in India (and later, briefly, in the Crimean War). Following this, he was engaged by the Royal Geographical Society to explore the east coast of Africa and led an expedition guided by the locals and was the first European to see Lake Tanganyika. In later life, he served as British consul in Fernando Pó, Santos, Damascus and, finally, Trieste. He was a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society and was awarded a knighthood (KCMG) in 1886. This revolver has overall surface russetting, and its barrel wedge is lacking as is a bottom screw, the main spring is strong but non actioning, however, it is remarkably inexpensive, and a great looking artifact of the Civil War and Wild West period of American history. As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables

Code: 23214

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Sporting Notions ALKEN, Henry Published by London: T. McLean, 1831-33, 1831

NOW SOLD *** Using our ‘Inspiration For Christmas Service’ to the partner of a world renown race horse owner in Hong Kong. The Rarest Alken In Colour The Comic Story of Men On Steeds At Unsafe Speeds ALKEN, Henry. Sporting Notions. London: T. McLean, 1831-33. First edition. Originally thirty-six hand-coloured soft-ground etchings and aquatints with tissue guards, as issued, but lacking four plates, without title page, watermarked 1831-1833. Contemporary half black morocco over pebbled paper boards with gilt-stamped vignette to upper board signed "Knight Sc." (Charles Parsons Knight). Some discolouration to cloth. Occasional staining to margins. A really fine copy of one of the finest and rarest Alken colour plate books. Only one coloured copy has come to auction within the last thirty-six years - the Jeanson copy sold at Christie's in 1987. and sold again at Christie's in 2012. This volume is considerably less than half price due to lacking four plates. The Plates: 1. All he is fit for Sir, now is to be cut up. 2. I have a Notion that the Brute is going to make the best of his way out. 3. I had not the most distant Notion that my Horse was going to stop. 4. I had a Notion that Timber jumping was quite an easy thing. 5. I begin to have a Notion that my Horse is Dead. 6. I have a Notion that this is what is called a Bog. 7. I have a Notion that this may be called "Riding to the hounds at a Smashing rate." 8. This gives me a Notion that its better to "Look before you leap." 9. I have a Notion you must pull him over or persuade him to pull you back again. 10. I have a Notion that this will a Bridge my Sport. 11. I had no Notion of the Comforts of Hunting by Water. 12. My good fellows have you any Notion. 13. My dear fellows I have a Notion. 14. My Notion is we shall get him up pretty shortly. 15. Its my Notion that this is the only way. 16. I have a Notion that my Horse looks like 40 Guineas to the Pound. 17. Hav'nt you a Notion. 18. I have a Notion that I don't look like Mazeppa. 19. Hallo you ditchers. 20. I have a notion however hard work it is. 21. I say my fine fellow. 22. I had a Notion that that there was room for two to go through at a time. 23. I have a notion that Ducrow could not excell this. 24. I have a Notion that that even Chiffney. 25. I have a Notion that anything is acceptable. 26. I have a Notion that you are going the wrong way, don't you see our party out yonder. 27. I have a Notion that I have made a Bull. 28. I have a notion you've made a damn near shot. 29. I have a Notion he's pinn'd him. 30. Woo - Woo- I have a notion that I shall lose him. 31. I have a strong Notion. 32. A Gad I had no Notion. 33. Well I have a very strong Notion. 34. I have a notion that that I am not quite up to this riding in Surry. 35. I have a Notion that this is about the hardest mouthed Horse in England. 36. I now have a Notion that yo should always Look before you Leap. "First edition. The plates are a fine example of Alken's work at the height of his career" Henry Alken worked in both oil and watercolor and was a skilled etcher. His earliest productions were published anonymously under the signature of "Ben Tallyho", but in 1816 he issued The Beauties & Defects in the Figure of the Horse comparatively delineated under his own name. From this date until about 1831, he produced many sets of etchings of sporting subjects mostly colored and sometimes humorous in character, the principal of which were: Humorous Specimens of Riding 1821, Symptoms of being amazed 1822, Symptoms of being amused 1822, Flowers from Nature 1823, A Touch at the Fine Arts 1824, and Ideas 1830. Besides these he published a series of books: Illustrations for Landscape Scenery and Scraps from the Sketch Book of Henry Alken in 1823, New Sketch Book in 1824, Sporting Scrap Book and Shakespeare's Seven Ages in 1827, Sporting Sketches and in 1831 and Sporting Notions (1831-1833), Illustrations to Popular Songs and Illustrations of Don Quixote, the latter engraved by John Christian Zeitter. Alken provided the plates picturing hunting, coaching, racing and steeplechasing for The National Sports of Great Britain (London, 1821). Alken, known as an avid sportsman,is best remembered for his hunting prints, many of which he engraved himself until the late 1830s. (Charles Lane British Racing Prints pp. 75-76). He created prints for the leading sporting printsellers such as S. and J. Fuller, Thomas McLean, and Rudolph Ackermann, and often collaborated with his friend the sporting journalist Charles James Apperley (1779-1843), also known as Nimrod. Nimrod's Life of a Sportsman, with 32 etchings by Alken, was published by Ackermann in 1842. In many of his etchings, Alken explored the comic side of riding and satirized the foibles of aristocrats, much in the tradition of other early 19th century caricaturists such as Thomas Rowlandson and James Gillray. One of his best known paintings, "The Belvoir Hunt: Jumping Into And Out Of A Lane", hangs in the Tate Britain and shows one of the oldest of the great foxhound packs in Leicestershire. A collection of his illustrations can be seen in the print department of the British Museum.

Code: 14997

8400.00 GBP

Archived


A Most Attractive Dyak Tribe Mandau Head Hunter's Sword

A most Dyak sword mandau, swollen SE blade 18½”, flat on one side and tapered on the other with a line of dots and stars, back edge pierced with 3 sets of 4 holes and 2 elephant heads towards point, rattan bound ivory grip, the pommel carved in the form of a stylized antelope with 2 hair tufts, in its rattan bound stylized wooden scabbard with belt loops. A scarce Mandau of the Dayak people, of Kalimantan, Indonesia. With beautifully traditionally carved antler hilt, complete with some hair. Traditional blade with convex obverse and concave reverse. Wooden sheath with upper and lower surfaces carved in relief with matching carved dragonlike shapes, bound with wonderfully woven bi-colored reed wraps, including the original woven reed hanging cords and with it's bi-knife sleeve. The blade was apparently designed convex in such a way as the head could be decapitated more easily by a swinging arc while running. The last photo in the gallery is a period photo of an indigenous Head Hunter, holding his 'prize', achieved with his Mandau

Code: 23316

595.00 GBP

Archived


A German S-mine (Schrapnellmine, Springmine or Splittermine in German), also known as the "Bouncing Betty" on the Western Front

RESERVED French soldiers encountered the S-mine during minor probes into the coal-rich German Saar region in September 7–11, 1939, during the Saar Offensive. The S-mine contributed to the withdrawal of these French incursions.3 The mine's performance in the Saar region affirmed its effectiveness in the eyes of the German leadership and prompted the United States and other countries to copy its design.4 After their experience, the French nicknamed the mine "the silent soldier".

The Third Reich used the S-mine heavily during the defense of its occupied territories and the German homeland during the Allied invasions of Europe and North Africa. The mines were produced in large numbers and planted liberally by defending German units. For example, the German Tenth Army deployed over 23,000 of them as part of their defense preparation during the Allied invasion of Italy.5

S-mines were deployed on the beaches of Normandy in preparation for the anticipated invasion as part of a general program of heavy mining and fortification. On the Îles-St.-Marcouf, just off Utah Beach, where the Allied planners feared the Germans had established heavy gun batteries, Rommel had ordered S-mines to be "sown like grass seed."6 To build the Atlantic Wall, Germans deployed millions of mines of various types, anti-personnel mines (such as the S-mine), dug hundreds of kilometers of trenches, laid barbed wire, and constructed thousands of beach obstacles.7 The mines were subsequently used to defend German positions during the Battle of Normandy and in the defense of Northern France and the German border. S-mines were typically used in combination with anti-tank mines to resist the advances of both armor and infantry.3 The Allies removed an estimated 15,000 unexploded mines from dunes by Pouppeville after the initial invasion

Code: 23339

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An Original, Combat Damaged, Trafalgar Period Figure of 8 Royal Naval Cutlass

This is a fine Royal Naval issue cutlass ,exactly as used aboard HMS Victory in the Battle of Trafalgar. The upper circle part of the ‘8’ guard has been shot away, either by direct impact from a musket or pistol ball or even a canon ball, the bottom circle of the ‘8’ guard is intact, loose, but complete. The blade is good full length and only lightly pitted. The cast segmented grip is good and complete. A British Royal Navy "double disk" or figure-8 naval cutlass with ribbed cast steel grip. This was the very pattern of cutlass commonly found in the late 18th century used by both British and American navies as documented in the authoritative "Boarders Away" reference guide. Measuring inches overall these were often held without scabbards in racks aboard ship to allow instant access to repel boarders. Remains of bottom guard present. Covered in old pitting, seen use and age, clearly absolutely original, just as used at the Battle of Trafalgar!Advances in metal working techniques allowed the production of sheet iron cutlass guards to be more easily produced during the latter part of the 18th century, and when the Royal Navy finally adopted a regulation cutlass pattern in 1804, it was based upon Hollier’s “figure-8” double disc sheet iron guard design, which had already showed its strength and popularity on the high seas. In 1804 the Royal Navy standardized the naval cutlass pattern and ordered 10,000 of the swords on May 30 of that year. While that may seem like a large number of cutlasses, but the standard issue for ships of the line was 350 cutlasses for 1st and 2nd rate vessels and 280 cutlasses for 3rd rates. A first rate “Ship of the Line” in the British Navy circa 1800 was armed with 100+ guns, had 3 gun decks (not counting the exposed upper deck, quarter deck and forecastle) and was crewed by 850 to 875 sailors. That meant 350 cutlasses provided one cutlass for approximately every 2 “ men. A 2nd rate ship of the line was also a 3-decker with at least 90 guns, crewed by 700-750 men, so the ratio of cutlasses to men was approximately 1:2. A 3rd rate ship had 64-80 guns, was crewed by 500-650 men, and with 280 cutlasses on board, had a sailor to cutlass ratio of between 1:1.8 and 1:2.3. Based upon these figures, the Royal Navy was trying to provide cutlasses for approximately every 2-3 sailors, so an order of 10,000 would supply between 20,000 and 30,000 seamen, only a fraction of the overall size of the Royal Navy during the Napoleonic Wars. This newly formalized cutlass pattern had a wide, heavy blade without fuller that between 27 7/8” and 29 ““ in length, with most sources giving a nominal length of 28 ““ as standard. The blades were typically 1 ““ to 1 ““ wide at the ricasso. The tang of the blade passed through a cast iron grip that was grooved in both horizontally and vertically to provide a firm grip when wet. This is likely a souvenir of service of a retired Napoleonic Wars Royal Naval Officer or seaman.

Code: 23325

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