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A Very Interesting & Attractive 18th Century American Flintlock Pistol

It has a blunderbuss type swamped steel two stage barrel, a typical Queen Anne style stock, but the butt in its working life has been covered in stitched hide, absolutely typical of workmanship by the Native American Indians in the 1760's. It has an early re-curved trigger and working flintlock action. The stock was made with no provision for a ram rod, or a trigger guard. It also has an old brass museum exhibition collection numbered disc stick present tied to the trigger. This is a most intriguing flintlock, the action is named North. Often referred in the States as a Native American 'Blanket Gun' Term "Blanket Gun" was popularized after the ambush staged by Capt Jack in a California parlAy during the Modoc wars. From the time the British and French first arrived in what was then termed the New World, fur agents and military officers began to earn Native harvested animal pelts and strategic alliances with what were called Trade Muskets (or Fusil de Chasse for the French) going back to about 1660 or so. These guns were basic grade smoothbore flintlocks and doglocks that differed from military-grade arms of the time in the respect that they did not have the same fit and finish, were often a smaller caliber (so they could not use captured stocks of military ball in time of war), and had no provision to fit a bayonet.

As young warriors and sportsmen of any culture are known to do with personal weapons, these muskets and pistols soon took on a life of their own. Often, the musket length barrels were cut down to both make them easier to carry through the wilderness and along river travel and to turn surplus metal into tools and instruments. Ramrods likewise soon went the way of the dodo bird on many Native trade muskets and are rarely encountered. To enhance, reinforce and decorate the wooden furniture that often swelled and cracked in field conditions, tacks were applied, as were finely applied leather and hide wraps.

These firearms are often called blanket guns or canoe guns, the first primarily dealing with Native peoples West of the Mississippi along the Great Plains in the late 19th century, and the latter with those East of the Mississippi in earlier periods.

Code: 23284

1295.00 GBP


Shortlist item
A Most Rare 19th Century Irish Crum Castle Infantry Large Shako Helmet Plate

This is a super, large Shako helmet plate from one of the small Irish Militia of the 19th century. Their motto was 'Rebels Lie Down'. Surviving artefacts of this militia are so scarce that we know of only one other surviving piece of early uniform militaria, a shoulder belt plate, regimentally named and also bearing their motto. Crum Castle was the alternative old spelling of Crom Castle, County Fermanagh. Although the Yeomanry’s official existence ended in 1834, the last rusty muskets were not removed from their dusty stores till the early 1840s. With unintentional but obvious symbolism, they were escorted to the ordnance stores by members of the new constabulary. Although gone, the Yeomen were most certainly not forgotten. For one thing, they were seen as the most recent manifestation of a tradition of Protestant self-defence stretching back to plantation requirements of armed service from tenants then re-surfacing in different forms such as the Williamite county associations, the eighteenth-century Boyne Societies, anti-Jacobite associations of 1745 and the Volunteers. Such identification had been eagerly promoted. At the foundation of an Apprentice Boys’ club in 1813, Colonel Blacker, a Yeoman and Orangeman, amalgamated the siege tradition, the Yeomanry and 1798 in a song entitled The Crimson Banner:

Again when treason maddened round,
and rebel hordes were swarming,
were Derry’s sons the foremost found,
for King and Country arming.

Moreover, the idea of a yeomanry remained as a structural template for local, gentry-led self-defence, particularly in Ulster. When volunteering was revived in Britain in 1859, northern Irish MPs like Sharman Crawford tried unsuccessfully to use the Yeomanry precedent to get similar Irish legislation. Yeomanry-like associations were mooted in the second Home Rule crisis of 1893. The Ulster Volunteer Force of 1911-14—often led by the same families like Knox of Dungannon—defined their role like Yeomen, giving priority to local defence and exhibiting great reluctance to leave their own districts for training in brigades. Two loop mounts [one with old re-bedding] 6.25 inches high.

Code: 23283

995.00 GBP


Shortlist item
9th 11th Century Bronze Encolpion Reliquary Cross.

On the face of this work the engraved crucified Christ appears, he wears the colobium, an iconographic type established in the Early Christian centuries. On the reverse, the Virgin Mary (Mother of God) stands in an orans prayer pose. The hollow portion formed inside the box was intended for the sacred relic that the faithful would have worn around the neck. Part three of the amazing collection of Crusades period Crucifixes and reliquary crosses for the early Anglo Norman Crusader knights and Jerusalem pilgrims. As used in the early Crusades Period by Knights, such as the Knights of Malta [Knights Hospitaller], the Knights of Jerusalem the Knights Templar, the Knights of St John.The new Norman rulers were culturally and ethnically distinct from the old French aristocracy, most of whom traced their lineage to the Franks of the Carolingian dynasty from the days of Charlemagne in the 9th century. Most Norman knights remained poor and land-hungry, and by the time of the expedition and invasion of England in 1066, Normandy had been exporting fighting horsemen for more than a generation. Many Normans of Italy, France and England eventually served as avid Crusaders soldiers under the Italo-Norman prince Bohemund I of Antioch and the Anglo-Norman king Richard the Lion-Heart, one of the more famous and illustrious Kings of England. An encolpion "on the chest" is a medallion with an icon in the centre worn around the neck upon the chest. This stunning and large neck worn example is bronze three part with its hinged top. 10th to 12th century. The hollow portion formed inside the cross was intended for the sacred relic that the faithful would have worn around the neck. The custom of carrying a relic was largely widespread, and many early bronze examples were later worn by the Crusader knights on their crusades to liberate the Holy Land. Relics of the True Cross became very popular from the 9th century, and were carried in cross-shaped reliquaries like this, often decorated with enamels, niellos, and precious stones. The True Cross is the name for physical remnants from the cross upon which Jesus Christ was crucified. Many Catholic and Orthodox churches possess fragmentary remains that are by tradition believed to those of the True Cross. Saint John Chrysostom relates that fragments of the True Cross were kept in reliquaries "which men reverently wear upon their persons". A fragment of the True Cross was received by King Alfred from Pope Marinus I (Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, year 883). An inscription of 359, found at Tixter, in the neighbourhood of Sétif in Mauretania, was said to mention, in an enumeration of relics, a fragment of the True Cross, according to an entry in Roman Miscellanies, X, 441.

Fragments of the Cross were broken up, and the pieces were widely distributed; in 348, in one of his Catecheses, Cyril of Jerusalem remarked that the "whole earth is full of the relics of the Cross of Christ," and in another, "The holy wood of the Cross bears witness, seen among us to this day, and from this place now almost filling the whole world, by means of those who in faith take portions from it." Egeria's account testifies to how highly these relics of the crucifixion were prized. Saint John Chrysostom relates that fragments of the True Cross were kept in golden reliquaries, "which men reverently wear upon their persons." Even two Latin inscriptions around 350 from today's Algeria testify to the keeping and admiration of small particles of the cross. Around the year 455, Juvenal Patriarch of Jerusalem sent to Pope Leo I a fragment of the "precious wood", according to the Letters of Pope Leo. A portion of the cross was taken to Rome in the seventh century by Pope Sergius I, who was of Byzantine origin. "In the small part is power of the whole cross", says an inscription in the Felix Basilica of Nola, built by bishop Paulinus at the beginning of 5th century. The cross particle was inserted in the altar.

The Old English poem Dream of the Rood mentions the finding of the cross and the beginning of the tradition of the veneration of its relics. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle also talks of King Alfred receiving a fragment of the cross from Pope Marinus (see: Annal Alfred the Great, year 883). Although it is possible, the poem need not be referring to this specific relic or have this incident as the reason for its composition. However, there is a later source that speaks of a bequest made to the 'Holy Cross' at Shaftesbury Abbey in Dorset; Shaftesbury abbey was founded by King Alfred, supported with a large portion of state funds and given to the charge of his own daughter when he was alive – it is conceivable that if Alfred really received this relic, that he may have given it to the care of the nuns at Shaftesbury

Most of the very small relics of the True Cross in Europe came from Constantinople. The city was captured and sacked by the Fourth Crusade in 1204: "After the conquest of the city Constantinople inestimable wealth was found: incomparably precious jewels and also a part of the cross of the Lord, which Helena transferred from Jerusalem and [which] was decorated with gold and precious jewels. There it attained [the] highest admiration. It was carved up by the present bishops and was divided with other very precious relics among the knights; later, after their return to the homeland, it was donated to churches and monasteries.To the category of engolpia belong also the ampullae, or vials or vessels of lead, clay or other materials in which were preserved such esteemed relics as oil from the lamps that burned before the Holy Sepulchre, and the golden keys with filings from St. Peter's chains, one of which was sent by St. Gregory the Great to the Frankish King Childebert.

Encolpion, a different anglicization of the same word, covers the early medieval tradition in both Eastern and Western Christianity. Superb condition, top swivel ring mount immobile, still sealed, so it may still contain part of the 'real cross'.
Surface in very good condition, with typical natural aged patina with encrustations. 7.5 cms x 3.9cms

Code: 23287

1495.00 GBP


Shortlist item
A Good Viking Spear Head 1000 to 1100 Years Old

Overall in superb and well preserved condition. Only deeper pitting on one blade face. This almost certainly may be a traditional Viking pattern welded blade, in the traditional 'Wolf's Teeth' form, but the surface is too intact to tell, however its shape is very similar to the most famous recovered 'Wolf's Teeth' Viking spear head in Helsinki Museum [see gallery]. According to the older parts of the Gulating Law, dating back to before the year 900 AD covering Western Norway, a free man was required to own a sword or ax, spear and shield. It was said that Olaf Tryggvason, King of Norway from 995-1000 AD, could throw two spears at the same time. In chapter 55 of Laxdæla saga, Helgi had a spear with a blade one ell long (about 50cm, or 20in). He thrust the blade through Bolli's shield, and through Bolli. In chapter 8 of Króka-Refs saga, Refur made a spear for himself which could be used for cutting, thrusting, or hewing. Refur split Þorgils in two down to his shoulders with the spear. The spearheads were made of iron, and, like sword blades, were made using pattern welding techniques (described in the article on swords) during the early part of the Viking era . They could be decorated with inlays of precious metals or with scribed geometric patterns
After forming the head, the smith flattened and drew out material to form the socket . This material was formed around a mandrel and usually was welded to form a solid socket. In some cases, the overlapping portions were left unwelded. Spear heads were fixed to wooden shafts using a rivet. The sockets on the surviving spear heads suggest that the shafts were typically round, with a diameter of 2-3cm (about one inch).

However, there is little evidence that tells us the length of the shaft. The archaeological evidence is negligible, and the sagas are, for the most part, silent. Chapter 6 of Gísla saga tells of a spear so long-shafted that a man's outstretched arm could touch the rivet. The language used suggests that such a long shaft was uncommon.

Perhaps the best guess we can make is that the combined length of shaft and head of Viking age spears was 2 to 3m (7-10ft) long, although one can make arguments for the use of spears having both longer and shorter shafts. A strong, straight-grained wood such as ash was used. Many people think of the spear as a throwing weapon. One of the Norse myths tells the story of the first battle in the world, in which Oðin, the highest of the gods, threw a spear over the heads of the opposing combatants as a prelude to the fight. The sagas say that spears were also thrown in this manner when men, rather than gods, fought. At the battle at Geirvör described in chapter 44 of Eyrbyggja saga, the saga author says that Steinþórr threw a spear over the heads of Snorri goði and his men for good luck, according to the old custom. More commonly, the spear was used as a thrusting weapon. The sagas tell us thrusting was the most common attack in melees and one-on-one fighting, and this capability was used to advantage in mass battles. In a mass battle, men lined up, shoulder to shoulder, with shields overlapping. After all the preliminaries, which included rock throwing, name calling, the trading of insults, and shouting a war cry (æpa heróp), the two lines advanced towards each other. When the lines met, the battle was begun. Behind the wall of shields, each line was well protected. Once a line was broken, and one side could pass through the line of the other side, the battle broke down into armed melees between small groups of men.

Before either line broke, while the two lines were going at each other hammer and tongs, the spear offered some real advantages. A fighter in the second rank could use his spear to reach over the heads of his comrades in the first rank and attack the opposing line. Konungs skuggsjá (King’s Mirror), a 13th century Norwegian manual for men of the king, says that in the battle line, a spear is more effective than two swords. In regards to surviving iron artefacts of the past two millennia, if Western ancient edged weapons were either lost, discarded or buried in the ground, and if the ground soil were made up of the right chemical composition, then some may survive exceptionally well. As with all our items it comes complete with our certificate of authenticity 12.25 inches long

Code: 23285

Reserved


10th to 11th Century Reliquary Cross Pendant, Crusaders Era, Still Sealed

With a deep relief cast Jesus Christ on the cross, dressed with a long robe (sticharion) and two flanking small figures (Virgin Mary and Saint John),

The hollow portion formed inside the box was intended for the sacred relic that the faithful would have worn around the neck. Part three of the amazing collection of Crusades period Crucifixes and reliquary crosses for the early Anglo Norman Crusader knights and Jerusalem pilgrims. As used in the early Crusades Period by Knights, such as the Knights of Malta [Knights Hospitaller], the Knights of Jerusalem the Knights Templar, the Knights of St John.The new Norman rulers were culturally and ethnically distinct from the old French aristocracy, most of whom traced their lineage to the Franks of the Carolingian dynasty from the days of Charlemagne in the 9th century. Most Norman knights remained poor and land-hungry, and by the time of the expedition and invasion of England in 1066, Normandy had been exporting fighting horsemen for more than a generation. Many Normans of Italy, France and England eventually served as avid Crusaders soldiers under the Italo-Norman prince Bohemund I of Antioch and the Anglo-Norman king Richard the Lion-Heart, one of the more famous and illustrious Kings of England. An encolpion "on the chest" is a medallion with an icon in the centre worn around the neck upon the chest. This stunning and large neck worn example is bronze three part with its hinged top. 10th to 12th century. The hollow portion formed inside the cross was intended for the sacred relic that the faithful would have worn around the neck. The custom of carrying a relic was largely widespread, and many early bronze examples were later worn by the Crusader knights on their crusades to liberate the Holy Land. Relics of the True Cross became very popular from the 9th century, and were carried in cross-shaped reliquaries like this, often decorated with enamels, niellos, and precious stones. The True Cross is the name for physical remnants from the cross upon which Jesus Christ was crucified. Many Catholic and Orthodox churches possess fragmentary remains that are by tradition believed to those of the True Cross. Saint John Chrysostom relates that fragments of the True Cross were kept in reliquaries "which men reverently wear upon their persons". A fragment of the True Cross was received by King Alfred from Pope Marinus I (Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, year 883). An inscription of 359, found at Tixter, in the neighbourhood of Sétif in Mauretania, was said to mention, in an enumeration of relics, a fragment of the True Cross, according to an entry in Roman Miscellanies, X, 441.

Fragments of the Cross were broken up, and the pieces were widely distributed; in 348, in one of his Catecheses, Cyril of Jerusalem remarked that the "whole earth is full of the relics of the Cross of Christ," and in another, "The holy wood of the Cross bears witness, seen among us to this day, and from this place now almost filling the whole world, by means of those who in faith take portions from it." Egeria's account testifies to how highly these relics of the crucifixion were prized. Saint John Chrysostom relates that fragments of the True Cross were kept in golden reliquaries, "which men reverently wear upon their persons." Even two Latin inscriptions around 350 from today's Algeria testify to the keeping and admiration of small particles of the cross. Around the year 455, Juvenal Patriarch of Jerusalem sent to Pope Leo I a fragment of the "precious wood", according to the Letters of Pope Leo. A portion of the cross was taken to Rome in the seventh century by Pope Sergius I, who was of Byzantine origin. "In the small part is power of the whole cross", says an inscription in the Felix Basilica of Nola, built by bishop Paulinus at the beginning of 5th century. The cross particle was inserted in the altar.

The Old English poem Dream of the Rood mentions the finding of the cross and the beginning of the tradition of the veneration of its relics. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle also talks of King Alfred receiving a fragment of the cross from Pope Marinus (see: Annal Alfred the Great, year 883). Although it is possible, the poem need not be referring to this specific relic or have this incident as the reason for its composition. However, there is a later source that speaks of a bequest made to the 'Holy Cross' at Shaftesbury Abbey in Dorset; Shaftesbury abbey was founded by King Alfred, supported with a large portion of state funds and given to the charge of his own daughter when he was alive – it is conceivable that if Alfred really received this relic, that he may have given it to the care of the nuns at Shaftesbury

Most of the very small relics of the True Cross in Europe came from Constantinople. The city was captured and sacked by the Fourth Crusade in 1204: "After the conquest of the city Constantinople inestimable wealth was found: incomparably precious jewels and also a part of the cross of the Lord, which Helena transferred from Jerusalem and [which] was decorated with gold and precious jewels. There it attained [the] highest admiration. It was carved up by the present bishops and was divided with other very precious relics among the knights; later, after their return to the homeland, it was donated to churches and monasteries.To the category of engolpia belong also the ampullae, or vials or vessels of lead, clay or other materials in which were preserved such esteemed relics as oil from the lamps that burned before the Holy Sepulchre, and the golden keys with filings from St. Peter's chains, one of which was sent by St. Gregory the Great to the Frankish King Childebert.

Encolpion, a different anglicization of the same word, covers the early medieval tradition in both Eastern and Western Christianity. Superb condition, top swivel ring mount moving, still sealed, so it may still contain part of the 'real cross'.
Surface in very good condition, with typical natural aged patina with encrustations. 97 mm x 39mm

Code: 23286

1595.00 GBP


Shortlist item
A 17th Century Tanjore Battle Axe From The Era of Moghul Emperor Aurangzebe

From the era of Emperor Aurangzebe, from Lahore, in the Punjab. Iron combat axe head of iconic backswept form with elongated rectangular socket mount, on likely a later haft. Sobriquet Aurangzeb (Persian: "Ornament of the Throne") or by his regnal title Alamgir (Persian: "Conqueror of the World"), was the sixth, and widely considered the last effective Mughal emperor. His reign lasted for 49 years from 1658 until his death in 1707.

Aurangzeb was a notable expansionist and during his reign, the Mughal Empire reached its greatest extent, ruling over nearly all of the Indian subcontinent. During his lifetime, victories in the south expanded the Mughal Empire to 4 million square kilometres, and he ruled over a population estimated to be over 158 million subjects, with an annual yearly revenue of more than ten times that of his contemporary King Louis XIV of France, around 39 million pounds (almost 3 billion rupees) in 1690. Under his reign, India surpassed China to become the world's largest economy, nearly a quarter of world GDP in 1700.

Aurangzeb is considered one of India's most controversial kings. Some historians argue that his policies abandoned his predecessors' legacy of pluralism and religious tolerance, citing his destruction of Hindu temples and execution of a Sikh guru, while other historians question this, arguing that his destruction of temples has been exaggerated and were politically motivated, and noting that he built more temples than he destroyed, also destroyed Islamic mosques, paid for the maintenance of temples, employed significantly more Hindus in his imperial bureaucracy than his predecessors did, and opposed bigotry against Hindus and Shia Muslims.

It was at the end of his reign that the downfall of the Mughal Empire began. Rebellions and wars eventually led to the exhaustion of the imperial Mughal treasury and army. He was a strong-handed authoritarian ruler, and following his death the expansionary period of the Mughal Empire came to an end. Nevertheless, the contiguous territory of the Mughal Empire still remained intact more or less until the reign of Muhammad Shah.

Code: 20915

895.00 GBP


Shortlist item
Original EarIy Italianate Flintlock Holster Pistol As Favoured by 18th Century Corsairs &Pirates

A most attractive early 18th century pistol, designed to fit in a wide belt sash, or, in a flintlock pistol bucket. A pistol with superb charm and elegant lines. With a silver cartouch on the grip, fully floriate engraved over the lock and a stunningly floriate, Italianate, chisseled and engraved flared barrel. It has fairly plain steel mounts, a brass tipped steel ramrod, and a walnut stock. This is exactly the type of pistol one sees, and in fact expects to see, depicted in all the old Hollywood 'Pirate' films. A sprauncy chisseled barrel pistol, with a large, steel butt cap and complete with it's elongated extra long 'ears' [side straps] typical of the period of early gunmaking. It is finely embellished all over deepley chisseled rococco acanthus scrolling. The action is fully operational. This is an original, honest and impressive antique pistol piece that rekindles the little boy in all of us who once dreamt of being Errol Flynn, Swash-Buckling across the Spanish Maine under the Jolly Roger. This Pistol may very well have seen service with one of the old Corsairs of the Barbary Coast, in a tall masted Galleon, slipping it's way down the coast of the Americas, to find it's way home to Port Royal, or some other nefarious port of call in the Caribbean. It is exactly the form of weapon that was in use in the days of the Caribbean pirates and privateers, as their were no regular patterns of course. This pistol is essentially a Turko-Ottoman example of the highly attractive type that were efficient, effective, most sought after and much prized, and thus an essential part of the pirate's trade. They didn't conform to a regular pattern, varying in quality, but they all had the 'form follows function' ethos. A style of pistol that first surfaced around 1665, and saw the peak of it's popularity in Western Europe during the mid to third quarter of the 18th century. The design was overtaken, but only in much of Western Europe, by a simpler, plainer form of pistol design, but it continued to be very popular, no doubt due to it's extravagance and style, in middle and eastern Europe, especially around the Mediterranean, until the early 19th century. A good slender curvature, and a medium weight long pistol that suits a comfortable grip. It was written that after Queen Anne's War, which ended in 1713, it cast vast numbers of naval seamen into unemployment and caused a huge slump in wages. Around 40,000 men found themselves without work at the end of the war - roaming the streets of ports like Bristol, Portsmouth and New York. In wartime privateering provided the opportunity for a relative degree of freedom and a chance at wealth. The end of war meant the end of privateering too, and these unemployed ex-privateers only added to the huge labour surplus. Queen Anne's War had lasted 11 years and in 1713 many sailors must have known little else but warfare and the plundering of ships. It was commonly observed that on the cessation of war privateers turned pirate. The combination of thousands of men trained and experienced in the capture and plundering of ships suddenly finding themselves unemployed and having to compete harder and harder for less and less wages was explosive - for many piracy must have been one of the few alternatives to starvation. Euro-American pirate crews really formed one community, with a common set of customs shared across the various ships. Liberty, Equality and Fraternity thrived at sea over a hundred years before the French Revolution, and continued for many years after. The authorities were often shocked by their libertarian tendencies; the Dutch Governor of Mauritius met a pirate crew and commented: "Every man had as much say as the captain and each man carried his own weapons in his blanket". A 18th century pistol of eastern Mediterranean origin, and although it has signs of combat wear is still working highly effectively, and was likely used right into the mid 19th century. It looks most attractive, it is completely original, an antique flintlock of days long gone past yet not forgotten. Overall 16 inches long. As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables

Code: 20496

1375.00 GBP


Shortlist item
A Good Victorian 1856 Mk I Drummer's Sword

The unusual and scarce curved blade model. The Greeks sent warriors off to battle with music. The Romans incorporated music on the battlefield, using assorted fanfares to signal troop movements. The Europeans carried on the tradition -- Napoleon's army traveled with musicians.

The tactics, customs and ceremonies of the Civil War came from the Napoleonic tradition The Civil War was something of a bridge war between the wars of old and the wars of modern time.
Even during the war, there was an evolution. At the beginning of the war, a lot of units traveled with loud brass bands. As the warfare changed, so did the accompaniment, stripped down to fife and drum corps.

The field musicians played a vital role in the life of the regiment. They woke the troops in the morning with reveille
and put them to bed with taps. The drummers, during battle, would signal troops when to attack or fire or retreat. Often, during battle, the musicians would retreat to the rear and serve as stretcher bearers. Some generals - Custer among them - had the band play during battle, Guthmann said, believing "it made the men fight harder." Drummer Boy of Waterloo.

By Woodland Mary.
When battle rous'd each warlike band,
And carnage loud her trumpet blew,
Young Edwin left his native land,
A Drummer Boy for Waterloo.
His mother, when his lips she pressed,
And bade her noble boy adieu,
With wringing hands and aching breast,
Beheld him march for Waterloo.
With wringing hands,

But he that knew no infant tears,
His Knapsack o'er his shoulder threw,
And cried, ' Dear mother, dry those tears,
Till I return from Waterloo."
He went?and e'er the set of sun
Beheld our arms the foe subdue,
The flash of death?the murderous gun,
Had laid him low at Waterloo.
The flash of death, O comrades ! Comrades !' Edwin cried,
And proudly beam'd his eye of blue,
' Go tell my mother, Edwin died
A soldier's death at Waterloo.'
They plac'd his head upon his drum,
And 'neath the moonlight's mournful hue,
When night had stilled the battle's hum,
They dug his grave at Waterloo.
When night had still'd. In the painting of the drummer boy, if one looks behind his left leg one can see the bottom of the drummer boy's sword blade. Also in the gallery there is a snippet from the Siege of Lucknow in the Indian Mutiny 1857. An account of Drummer Ross of the 93rd playing his bugle under fire from the rebels and singing Yankee Doodle standing on the dome of the highest Mosque in Lucknow. On 28 November at the Second Battle of Cawnpore, 15-year-old Thomas Flynn, a drummer with the 64th Regiment of Foot, was awarded the Victoria Cross. "During a charge on the enemy's guns, Drummer Flynn, although wounded himself, engaged in a hand-to-hand encounter with two of the rebel artillerymen". He remains the youngest recipient of the Victoria Cross. A widely reported incident aat the Battle of Isandlwana during the Anglo-Zulu War of 1879, spelled the end of boys being sent on active service by the British Army. Part of the British force returned to their camp at night to find that it had been overrun by the Zulu army a few hours previously. An eyewitness reported that "Even the little drummer boys that we had in the band, they were hung up on hooks, and opened like sheep. It was a pitiful sight". Drummer boys although still with the title 'drummer boy' used bugles by then. No scabbard

Code: 18435

345.00 GBP


Shortlist item
See Our Viking Items Under Three Separate Categories, Axes, Ancient Spears and Ancient Swords

Code: 23280

Price
on
Request


A Good 18th Century Indian Arquebus Matchlock

From the time of Tippu Sultan, the Tiger of Mysore. A most superior example as some of their kind used in the 18th century were rather utilitarian and of martial quality. Superb stock with very fine patina, good multi staged barrel. Action linkage not connected. Bears a storage stamp for the armoury of the Maharajah of Jaipur. In the early 16th century, the term "arquebus" had a confusing variety of meanings. Some writers used it to denote any matchlock shoulder gun, referring to light versions as caliver and heavier pieces fired from a fork rest as musket. Others treated the arquebus and caliver synonymously, both referring to the lighter, forkless shoulder-fired matchlock. As the 16th century progressed, the term arquebus came to be clearly reserved for the lighter forkless weapon. When the wheel lock was introduced, wheel-lock shoulder arms came to be called arquebuses, while lighter, forkless matchlock and flintlock shoulder weapons continued to be called calivers. In the mid-17th century, the light flintlock versions came to be called fusils or fuzees. The first usage of the arquebus in large numbers was in Hungary under king Matthias Corvinus (r. 1458?1490). Every fourth soldier in the Black Army had an arquebus in the infantry, and every fifth regarding the whole army, which was an unusual ratio at the time. Although they were generally present in the battlefield King Mathias preferred enlisting shielded men instead, as the arquebus had a low rate of fire. Even a decade after the disbandment of the Black Army, by the turn of the 16th century, only around 10% of the soldiers of Western European armies used firearms. Arquebusiers were effective against cavalry and even other infantry, particularly when placed with pikemen in the pike and shot formation, which revolutionised the Spanish military. An example of where this formation was used and succeeded is the decisive Battle of Cerignola (1503), which was one of the first battles to utilise this formation, and was the first battle to be won through the use of gunpowder-based small arms. 76 inches long,

Code: 19066

1275.00 GBP


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