Antique Arms & Militaria

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A Very Special Offer Sword of W.C. Cuninghame, Distinguished Hero of the 79th Foot in the Crimean War & Subsequently Elevated, Due to His Gallantry, to a Position WIthin the Queen’s Bodyguard of H.M Queen Victoria

A Very Special Offer Sword of W.C. Cuninghame, Distinguished Hero of the 79th Foot in the Crimean War & Subsequently Elevated, Due to His Gallantry, to a Position WIthin the Queen’s Bodyguard of H.M Queen Victoria

We acquired three swords direct from the Cuninghame family, and they are all to be sold separately.

This was the service sword of William Cuninghame Cuninghame, Capt. Of the 79th Cameron Highlanders, son of William Alexander Cuninghame late of the 95th landed with his regiment in the Crimea. He served in the battle of Alma, Balaklava and Sebastepol awarded the Crimean medal with three clasps, and the Turkish medal not included. After his distinguished service in the Crimean War he became a member of the Corps of Gentleman at Arms, Queen Victoria's personal bodyguard. This was a highly esteemed position to obtain, and only a very few, of the very best, most distinguished, and respected British army officers were ever chosen to serve in such an exalted position. This is his basket hilted broadsword was commissioned from Wilkinson sword, completed on the 15th May, and delivered or colllected later in May, 1854 serial numbered 5174. The basket is complete with it's stag hide liner lined with traditional red uniform cloth with silk tassle. The broadsword blade is etched with Wilkinsons mark and the steel mounted leather scabbard once bore full engraving of his name crest and regiment. The Cuninghame name is one of Scotland’s oldest clan names, based on a regional name, and can trace their Scottish ancestry back to Cunninghame which is the northern part of Ayrshire.Traditionally, in 1059, King Malcolm rewarded Malcolm, son of Friskin with the Thanedom of Cunninghame. The name is therefore of territorial origin and it likely derives from cuinneag which means milk pail and the Saxon ham which means village. There is a story that states that Malcolm who was the son of Friskin, obtained the lands from Malcolm III of Scotland after he had sheltered him under hay in a barn The Cunninghams were certainly well settled in the parish of Kilmaurs by the end of the thirteenth century. The son of the Laird of Kilmaurs was Hervy de Cunningham who fought for Alexander III of Scotland at the Battle of Largs in 1263 against the Norse invaders. During the Wars of Scottish Independence the Cunninghams were supporters of the Bruces in their fight for Scottish independence. A detail of the 79th Cameron Highlanders at Alma goes as follows; About half-past one o?clock 20th Sept 1854 the action commenced by the Russians opening fire from the redoubt on the left upon the French, who were attempting to assail their position in that direction. The British forces then formed in line, and proceeded to cross the river about the village of Burliuk. The light and second divisions led the way preceded by the skirmishers of the Rifle Brigade, who advanced through the vineyards beyond the village, and spreading themselves along the margin of the river, engaged the Russian riflemen on the opposite bank.

The first division, which formed the left of the allied army, advancing in support, traversed the vineyard and crossed the river, protected by its overhanging banks. On reaching the slope of the hill, the three Highland regiments formed line in ?ch?lon, and, "with the precision of a field-day advanced to the attack, the 42nd Royal Highlanders on the right, and the 79th Cameron Highlanders on the left, the extreme left of the allied army." "The magnificent mile of line," says Captain Jameson, "displayed by the Guards and Highlanders, the prominent bear-skin, the undulating waves of the clan-tartans, the stalwart frames, steady and confident bearing of these young and eager soldiers advancing under fire, can never be forgotten by those who witnessed it, whilst it contributed materially to the discouragement of the enemy, whose columns perceptibly wavered as they approached. His masses of four - and - twenty deep, absolutely reeled and staggered to and fro under the murderous fire of the Scottish line, which was delivered with great effect at a distance of 200 yards."
We show in the gallery a painting of the 79th Highlanders charging at Alma, a photo of Capt. W.C.Cuninghame's Crimean War & Queen's Bodyguard Diamond Jubilee medal that were sold some years ago, and a photo of Capt. Cuninghame as part of Queen Victoria's personal bodyguard at the Jubilee service at St Paul's Cathedral 1897 . The basket has a small bar lacking on one side due to hand to hand combat contact damage. As the scabbard is steel mounted, not brass as are his ancestors swords, the family name crest and regiment engraving on the scabbard has all but disappeared due to very light old surface pitting but traces of it can be identified in the right light. It would likely need modern infra red light technology to reveal it fully. 32.25 inch blade. Capt. Cuninghame's Medals and photos in the gallery not included.  read more

Code: 20427

4375.00 GBP

An Exceptional 1888 The Sherwood Foresters {Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire} Regimental Lee Metford Mk1 Pattern 2 Bayonet With Excellent Scabbard

An Exceptional 1888 The Sherwood Foresters {Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire} Regimental Lee Metford Mk1 Pattern 2 Bayonet With Excellent Scabbard

In superb condition, a real beauty!. Regimentally marked for the Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire regiment, 'DY', The Sherwood Foresters, formed in 1881, {who later served at Gallipoli}. Scabbard stamped EFD for Enfield.

Sherwood Foresters saw action in Egypt during the Anglo-Egyptian War, and was stationed at Malta from September 1898. Following the outbreak of the Second Boer War in October 1899, the battalion was sent to South Africa where they arrived in December. They were stationed in the Orange Free State and took part in fighting under General Sir William Gatacre. From April 1900 they were part of the 21st Infantry brigade under General Bruce Hamilton.3 The battalion stayed in South Africa until the end of the war, then transferred on the SS Wakool to a new posting at Hong Kong in September 1902.4

The 2nd Battalion served in India from 1882 to 1898, and saw action in the Sikkim Expedition 1888 and the North West Frontier campaign 1897–1898, after which they transferred to Aden. They were stationed at Malta from February 1900 until returning home in May 1902

The Lee-Metford rifle (a.k.a. Magazine Lee-Metford, abbreviated MLM) was a bolt action British army service rifle, combining James Paris Lee's rear-locking bolt system and ten-round magazine with a seven groove rifled barrel designed by William Ellis Metford. It replaced the Martini-Henry rifle in 1888, following nine years of development and trials, but remained in service for only a short time until replaced by the similar Lee-Enfield.

We bought the entire small collection from the widow of a 'Best of British Empire Rifles and Bayonets, Both British and German' collector, who acquired them over the past 40 years, and only ever kept the very best he could afford to keep. Act fast they are selling really fast, three rifles and eight bayonets and a cutlass have sold in two days alone.. Top quality and condition,19th and 20th century scarce British and German collectables are always the most desirable of all. Also for use with the earliest form of Long Lee Rifle, the Boer War and early WW1 Enfield Rifle Fitting the early Long Lee Rifle until 1903/4 when the Long Lee had a new narrower bayonet bar fitted and the cleaning rod channel removed, the later 1903 Metford bayonet thus altered to fit, but retaining the same blade until the 1907 long bladed SMLE bayonet was devised. The Lee Metford and Long Lee rifle and bayonet were used in the Chinese Legations during the Boxer Rebellion in Peking in June 1900.

The Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire regt. in 1914 they became part of the First New Army (K1) and then moved to Grantham to join the 33rd Brigade of the 11th Division.The 11th (Northern) Division, was an infantry division of the British Army during the First World War, raised from men who had volunteered for Lord Kitchener's New Armies. The division fought in the Gallipoli Campaign and on the Western Front. The division's insignia was an ankh or ankhus.

April 1915 Moved to the Frensham area.
July 1915 Embarked for Mudros from Liverpool.
20-31.07.1915 At Helles and engaged in various actions against the Turkish Army including;
07.08.1915 Landed at Suvla Bay;
The Battle of Sari Bair in the Gallipoli campaign
Dec 1915 Deployed to Imbros.
Feb 1916 Deployed to Egypt and took over a section of the Suez Canal defences.
July 1916 Deployed to France and engaged in various action on the Western Front including;
The capture of the Wundt-Werk, The Battle of Flers-Courcelette, The Battle of Thiepval, the Battle of Delville wood on the 7th August 1916 as machinegunners alongside the Staffs
1917
Operations on the Ancre, The Battle of Messines, The Battle of the Langemarck, The Battle of Polygon Wood, The Battle of Broodseinde, The Battle of Poelcapelle.
1918
The Battle of the Scarpe, The Battle of the Drocourt-Quant Line, The Battle of the Canal du Nord, The Battle of Cambrai 1918, The pursuit to the Selle, The Battle of the Sambre.
11.11.1918 Ended the war south of Mons, Belgium.  read more

Code: 25159

325.00 GBP

Ancient Imperial Roman Discus Form Oil Lamp with Embossed Design Circa 100 AD

Ancient Imperial Roman Discus Form Oil Lamp with Embossed Design Circa 100 AD

Lamps were used throughout antiquity for the principal purpose of lighting in domestic, civic and also religious contexts (funerary or votive) where permanent light was required. The origin of the lamp is not known for certain, but it had become commonplace in Greece by the 4th century BCE, where its use replaced that of the torch known from earlier times. Since the large scale production of olive oil which (amongst other things) was used as lamp fuel and constituted part of a major industry in Ancient Greece it is not surprising that the mass-production of lamps occurred as they were in constant demand. This demand continued well into the Roman period and the subsequent CE era. As the industry continued to grow, so did the varied styles of lamps, that illustrated incredible diversity in their shapes, decorations and materials. Shapes ranged from simple single nozzled ones to others that had 12 or more spouts. Others demonstrated zoomorphic (animal) or anthropomorphic (human) forms, while others had varied decorations confined to the top of the lamp with vegetable or abstract motifs, but also figural scenes (mythological, legendary, gladiatorial, domestic life, erotica etc). Further, while terracotta was the most common material used for the production of these devices, they were also made in stone or metal such as gold or silver, but they were most commonly produced in bronze.  read more

Code: 25119

125.00 GBP

An Exceptional 1888 Royal Fusiliers Regimental Lee Metford Mk1 Pattern 2 Bayonet With Excellent Scabbard

An Exceptional 1888 Royal Fusiliers Regimental Lee Metford Mk1 Pattern 2 Bayonet With Excellent Scabbard

The Lee-Metford rifle (a.k.a. Magazine Lee-Metford, abbreviated MLM) was a bolt action British army service rifle, combining James Paris Lee's rear-locking bolt system and ten-round magazine with a seven groove rifled barrel designed by William Ellis Metford. It replaced the Martini-Henry rifle in 1888, following nine years of development and trials, but remained in service for only a short time until replaced by the similar Lee-Enfield.

We bought the entire small collection from the widow of a 'Best of British Empire Rifles and Bayonets, Both British and German' collector, who acquired them over the past 40 years, and only ever kept the very best he could afford to keep. Act fast they are selling really fast, three rifles and eight bayonets and a cutlass have sold in two days alone. Top quality and condition,19th and 20th century scarce British and German collectables are always the most desirable of all.

South Africa 1899 - 1902
Friction between Britain and the Boers turned to outright war in 1899 and a British Expeditionary Force, including the 2nd Battalion of the Royal Fusiliers, was dispatched to the Cape. The Battalion won the following honours for its Colours: 'Relief of Ladysmith' and 'South Africa, 1899 - 1902'.

Tibet 1904
The Younghusband Expedition of 1904
Determined to resist Russian influence on the borders of India, the British dispatched a mission to Tibet, commanded by Colonel Younghusband. The Tibetans brought the expedition to a halt and British reinforcements, including four companies from the the Royal Fusiliers, were summoned. The Fusiliers helped defeat the Tibetans at Gyangtse Jong in July 1904 and became the only British Regiment to fight an action at an altitude of 16,500 feet.

Also for use with the earliest form of Long Lee Rifle. The rifles were used in the Boer War, during the Relief of Peking, and with the early WW1 Enfield Rifle in the great war. Fitting the early Long Lee Rifle until 1903/4 when the Long Lee had a new narrower bayonet bar fitted and the cleaning rod channel removed, the later 1903 Metford bayonet thus altered to fit, but retaining the same blade until the 1907 long bladed SMLE bayonet was devised. The rifle and bayonet used in the Chinese Legations during the Boxer Rebellion in Peking in June 1900. The Battle of Peking, or historically the Relief of Peking, was the battle on 14–15 August 1900, in which a multi-national force, led by Britain, relieved the siege of foreign legations in Peking (now Beijing) during the Boxer Rebellion. From 20 June 1900, Boxer forces and Imperial Chinese troops had besieged foreign diplomats, citizens and soldiers within the legations of Austria-Hungary, Belgium, Britain, France, Italy, Germany, Japan, Netherlands, Russia, Spain and the United States within the city of Peking.

We show a photo in the gallery of a British detachment, outside Peking, all holding the rifle with the 1888 Lee Metford Rifle bayonet fitted in place

A poem dedicated to the 1888 pattern bayonet in the Boer War was written by soldier and poet PT Ross.
A Yeoman's Letters,PT Ross, 1901
Did I ever use the bay'nit, sir?
In the far off Transvaal War,
Where I fought for Queen and country, sir,
Against the wily Boer.
Aye, many a time and oft, sir,
I've bared the trusty blade,
And blessed the dear old Homeland, sir
Where it was carefully made.

Chorus
Then here's to the British bay'nit
Made of Sheffield steel,
And here's to the men who bore it -
Stalwart men and leal.

You notice the dents on the edge, sir
At Bronkhurst Spruit they were done;
I was getting a door for a fire,
For out of wood we had run.
I was smiting hard at the door, sir,
Or rafter, I'm not sure which,
When I struck on an iron screw, sir,
And the bay'nit got this niche
'Tis my mighty Excalibur, sir,
I've use it in joy and grief,
For digging up many a tater,
Or opening bully beef.
I have used it for breaking wire,
Making tents 'gainst rain and sun;
I have used it as a hoof-pick,
In a hundred ways and one.
Oh, how did the point get blunted, sir?
I was driving it home
As a picketing peg for my horse,
So that he should not roam.
I drove it in a little, sir,
And then in my haste, alas,
I stubbed the point on a rock, sir
Some inches below the grass.
You ask if it e'er took a life, sir?
Aye, I mind the time full well;
I had spotted him by a farm, sir,
And went for him with a yell.
He tried to escape me hard, sir,
But I plunged it in his side,
And there by his own backyard, sir,
A healthy porker died.

But did I draw it in action?
You ask me roughly now.
Yes, we were taking a kopje,
The foe were on the brow.
We drew and fixed our bay'nits,
The sun shone on the steel:
Death to the sniping beggars
We were about to deal.
Then, sweating and a-puffing,
We scaled the rocky heights,
But when we reaches the top, sir,
The foe was out of sight.
Has it e'er drawn human blood?
Yes once, I grieve to say;
It was not in a battle,
Or any bloody fray;
'Twas just outside Pretoria,
The deed was never meant,
I slipped and fell on the point, sir,
'Twas quite by accident.
Chorus
Then here's to the British bay'nit
Made of Sheffield steel,
And here's to the men who bore it -
Stalwart men and leal.
And here's to the Millennium,
The time of peaceful peace,
When neighbours shall love each other
And wicked wars shall cease.

Photos to be added tomorrow  read more

Code: 25153

325.00 GBP

A Superb Regimental 1856-8 Enfield Sword Bayonet

A Superb Regimental 1856-8 Enfield Sword Bayonet

The rifle that this sword bayonet was designed for was the type used in the Indian Mutiny at the "Seige and Relief of Lucknow" The rifle we are selling seperately now sold. Excellent original patina to all the steel fittings and hilt. Chequered leather grip with rivets, and screw affixed retaining spring. Excellent Yataghan blade in stunning polish. Excellent leather. The regiments that used this bayonet sword took part in the Second Opium War, the Indian Mutiny and the Third Anglo-Burmese War.

We bought the entire small collection from the widow of a 'Best of British Empire Rifles and Bayonets, Both British and German' collector, who acquired them over the past 40 years, and only ever kept the very best he could afford to keep. Act fast they are selling really fast, three rifles and eight bayonets and a cutlass have sold in two days alone. Top quality and condition,19th and 20th century scarce British and German collectables are always the most desirable of all.

Photos and more details added tomorrow  read more

Code: 25154

Reserved

A Superb Regimental 1856-8 Enfield Sword Bayonet

A Superb Regimental 1856-8 Enfield Sword Bayonet

The rifle that this sword bayonet was designed for was the type used in the Indian Mutiny at the "Seige and Relief of Lucknow" The rifle we are selling seperately now sold. Excellent original patina to all the steel fittings and hilt. Chequered leather grip with rivets, and screw affixed retaining spring. Excellent Yataghan blade in stunning polish. Excellent leather. The regiments that used this bayonet sword took part in the Second Opium War, the Indian Mutiny and the Third Anglo-Burmese War.

We bought the entire small collection from the widow of a 'Best of British Empire Rifles and Bayonets, Both British and German' collector, who acquired them over the past 40 years, and only ever kept the very best he could afford to keep. Act fast they are selling really fast, three rifles and eight bayonets and a cutlass have sold in two days alone.Top quality and condition,19th and 20th century scarce British and German collectables are always the most desirable of all.

Photos and more details added tomorrow  read more

Code: 25150

310.00 GBP

Exceptional Green Howards Regimental Lee Metford Rifle Bayonet, Alexandra, Prince of Wales Own Yorkshire Regt., 1888 Lee Metford Mk1 Pat. 2 Bayonet, Used In Combat Campaigns in The North West Frontier, The Sudan, To South Africa & The Relief of Kimberly

Exceptional Green Howards Regimental Lee Metford Rifle Bayonet, Alexandra, Prince of Wales Own Yorkshire Regt., 1888 Lee Metford Mk1 Pat. 2 Bayonet, Used In Combat Campaigns in The North West Frontier, The Sudan, To South Africa & The Relief of Kimberly

The Lee-Metford rifle (a.k.a. Magazine Lee-Metford, abbreviated MLM) was a bolt action British army service rifle, combining James Paris Lee's rear-locking bolt system and ten-round magazine with a seven groove rifled barrel designed by William Ellis Metford. It replaced the Martini-Henry rifle in 1888, following nine years of development and trials, but remained in service for only a short time until replaced by the similar Lee-Enfield.

We bought the entire small collection from the widow of a 'Best of British Empire Rifles and Bayonets, Both British and German' collector, who acquired them over the past 40 years, and only ever kept the very best he could afford to keep. Act fast they are selling really fast, three rifles and eight bayonets and a cutlass have sold in two days alone.. Top quality and condition,19th and 20th century scarce British and German collectables are always the most desirable of all. Also for use with the earliest form of Long Lee Rifle, the Boer War and early WW1 Enfield Rifle Fitting the early Long Lee Rifle until 1903/4 when the Long Lee had a new narrower bayonet bar fitted and the cleaning rod channel removed, the later 1903 Metford bayonet thus altered to fit, but retaining the same blade until the 1907 long bladed SMLE bayonet was devised. The Lee Metford and Long Lee rifle and bayonet were used in the Chinese Legations during the Boxer Rebellion in Peking in June 1900.
The Battle of Peking, or historically the Relief of Peking, was the battle on 14–15 August 1900, in which a multi-national force, led by Britain, relieved the siege of foreign legations in Peking (now Beijing) during the Boxer Rebellion. From 20 June 1900, Boxer forces and Imperial Chinese troops had besieged foreign diplomats, citizens and soldiers within the legations of Austria-Hungary, Belgium, Britain, France, Italy, Germany, Japan, Netherlands, Russia, Spain and the United States within the city of Peking.

From early 1890 the Green Howards regiment was stationed in British India, where it took part in military campaigns on the North-West Frontier. It had various postings, including at Sitapur and Benares until it was posted to Cawnpore

The regiment saw action in Egypt, in the Sudan, then moved to Jersey in 1895 followed by Ireland in 1898. After a brief spell regiment was posted to South Africa as reinforcement for the Second Boer War, where it was involved in the Relief of Kimberley and the battles of Diamond Hill (June 1900) and Belfast (August 1900). The Battle of Paardeberg.

This bayonet, after its service with the Green Howards, was later RGA stamped and transferred for service in the Royal Garrison Artillery.

A poem dedicated to the 1888 pattern bayonet in the Boer War was written by soldier and poet PT Ross.
A Yeoman's Letters,PT Ross, 1901
Did I ever use the bay'nit, sir?
In the far off Transvaal War,
Where I fought for Queen and country, sir,
Against the wily Boer.
Aye, many a time and oft, sir,
I've bared the trusty blade,
And blessed the dear old Homeland, sir
Where it was carefully made.

Chorus
Then here's to the British bay'nit
Made of Sheffield steel,
And here's to the men who bore it -
Stalwart men and leal.

You notice the dents on the edge, sir
At Bronkhurst Spruit they were done;
I was getting a door for a fire,
For out of wood we had run.
I was smiting hard at the door, sir,
Or rafter, I'm not sure which,
When I struck on an iron screw, sir,
And the bay'nit got this niche
'Tis my mighty Excalibur, sir,
I've use it in joy and grief,
For digging up many a tater,
Or opening bully beef.
I have used it for breaking wire,
Making tents 'gainst rain and sun;
I have used it as a hoof-pick,
In a hundred ways and one.
Oh, how did the point get blunted, sir?
I was driving it home
As a picketing peg for my horse,
So that he should not roam.
I drove it in a little, sir,
And then in my haste, alas,
I stubbed the point on a rock, sir
Some inches below the grass.
You ask if it e'er took a life, sir?
Aye, I mind the time full well;
I had spotted him by a farm, sir,
And went for him with a yell.
He tried to escape me hard, sir,
But I plunged it in his side,
And there by his own backyard, sir,
A healthy porker died.

But did I draw it in action?
You ask me roughly now.
Yes, we were taking a kopje,
The foe were on the brow.
We drew and fixed our bay'nits,
The sun shone on the steel:
Death to the sniping beggars
We were about to deal.
Then, sweating and a-puffing,
We scaled the rocky heights,
But when we reaches the top, sir,
The foe was out of sight.
Has it e'er drawn human blood?
Yes once, I grieve to say;
It was not in a battle,
Or any bloody fray;
'Twas just outside Pretoria,
The deed was never meant,
I slipped and fell on the point, sir,
'Twas quite by accident.
Chorus
Then here's to the British bay'nit
Made of Sheffield steel,
And here's to the men who bore it -
Stalwart men and leal.
And here's to the Millennium,
The time of peaceful peace,
When neighbours shall love each other
And wicked wars shall cease.  read more

Code: 25152

295.00 GBP

NOW SOLD A Simply Stunning, Late Victorian, Wilkinson Sword Contract, Royal Naval Issue Cutlass. In Such Pristine Condition It Could Likely Not Be Improved Upon

NOW SOLD A Simply Stunning, Late Victorian, Wilkinson Sword Contract, Royal Naval Issue Cutlass. In Such Pristine Condition It Could Likely Not Be Improved Upon

A better example you could not find of this eponymous sailor's combat cutlass of the Royal Navy manufactured by Wilkinson Sword. Ordnance stamps proliferate throughout the blade and hilt, and a prime example of a Victorian Naval Cutlass, to add to, or create a great collection of original combat service swords of the British armed forces. Used in the late Victorian period in and from the 1900's from the days of sail and dreadnoughts, up to the battleships of WW2..

Traditional steel bowl with rolled edge, regulation chequered leather grip held in place with 5 rivets, Wilkinson stamped blade, with numerous ordnance inspection stamps at the ricasso and back spine of the blade. A mix of bright steel and black-painted sword guards seem to have been used on board ship. It is likely that ceremonial weapons were kept in bright steel and service weapons were painted, either before being issued or on an ad hoc basis on ships.

The cutlass is a short sword with a wide single-edged blade that is often curved. In the Royal Navy it was a sword purchased by the government and issued to ratings, the enlisted men. Officers carried privately purchased swords and midshipmen dirks. Seaborne soldiers of the Royal Marines were not issued cutlasses and instead carried bayonets for their longarms. When carrying out a boarding action the first wave of sailors would often be issued a cutlass and pistol for offensive action while the second wave were armed with more defensive weapons such as the boarding pike.

The cutlass may have had its origins in the hanger, a short curved sword that was used by the Royal Navy in the 17th century. The term "cutlass" was never used by the navy as the designation for an individual weapon pattern; the official terms used were "Sword for Sea Service" or "Sword, Naval". However, the weapon was commonly referred to as such in unofficial and official situations, for example the navy drill manual describes "cutlass" exercises.

The final cutlass approved for naval use was the 1900 Pattern. This retained the straight blade of the 1889 Pattern, but introduced a fuller running one-third of the blade length. The bowl-type hilt with upturned rim was also retained, though a concave insert was added to the inside where the guard joins the pommel. This helped to cushion the user's little finger and was derived from the 1890 Pattern Cavalry Sword. The grip of the 1900 Pattern cutlass was more rectangular in section than its predecessor and had a knurled leather cover. The scabbard was identical to that used for the 1889 Pattern.

The 1900 Pattern cutlass was officially withdrawn by the Admiralty from combat service on 22 October 1936, under fleet order number 4572, however, it was still retained on board many combat service vessels in WW2. The order noted that the cutlass was no longer to be issued for use by landing parties but was to be retained for ceremonial use, with numbers being limited to 20 for each ship with more than 500 personnel and 10 for ships with fewer personnel. There are claims that this cutlass was used in combat during the 1940 Altmark incident, and that it was issued to a boarding party aboard HMS Armada in 1952. The cutlass last saw major landing party combat service was in 1900 during the Boxer Rebellion in China.

We had a restorer many years ago that served in the Royal Navy in the 1950's and 60's and he was convinced, as were many of his shipmates and officer's, that the removal from service of the cutlass by the Admiralty was simply madness. For, anti-pirate patrols became more prolific than ever, as they still are today, especially in the South China Seas, and pirate ship boarding parties and repel became almost a weekly occurrence, and as the penalty on the non-British local mainland, especially China, was execution for piracy, thus the pirates fought like devils.
On his ship the crew often had to dash to the galley and find the cook's knives, cleavers, hatchets, and even broom handles, as guns we often not always issued in time on board ship, and the pirates showed no quarter!, and even if the guns were issued, the British sailors hesitated to use them, for if they did, and it ended in the fatality of a pirate, who was intent on killing the British matelot, the British sailor would face a courts marshal, and even, possibly, imprisonment,... madness indeed!  read more

Code: 25151

SOLD

NOW SOLD An Incredibly Rare And Famously Desireable to Collectors, The Original Lee Metford, British Bayonet, 3 Rivet, Mk 1, 1st Type. The 1st Pattern, P1888 Metford Bayonet used at Omdurman

NOW SOLD An Incredibly Rare And Famously Desireable to Collectors, The Original Lee Metford, British Bayonet, 3 Rivet, Mk 1, 1st Type. The 1st Pattern, P1888 Metford Bayonet used at Omdurman

This is an incredibly interesting very rare first pattern first type M1888 Lee Metford Rifle bayonet. Very few of these were made, in fact less than 5% of production of the Metford bayonet was the 3 rivet 1st pattern type 1, before the Mk1 Type II was introduced.
The reason for the rapid design change was that the positioning of the three rivets resulted in the grip scales splitting in field conditions so the Mk1, type II was introduced with only two rivets. This super bayonet has many inspection stamps and dates throughout.
We bought the entire small collection from the widow of a 'Best of British Empire Rifles and Bayonets, Both British and German' collector, who acquired them over the past 40 years, and only ever kept the very best he could afford to keep. Act fast they are selling really fast, three rifles and six bayonets and a cutlass have sold today alone. Top quality and condition,19th and 20th century scarce British and German collectables are always the most desirable of all.

They were used at the Battle of Omdurman in the Sudan

Battle of Omdurman:
The British troops wore the new khaki field uniforms with the characteristic pith helmet. The two Highland regiments wore the kilt. The British infantry regiments were armed with the Lee-Metford bolt action magazine rifle. Each battalion had a Maxim gun detachment.

The Battle of Omdurman was fought during the Anglo-Egyptian conquest of Sudan between a British–Egyptian expeditionary force commanded by British Commander-in-Chief (sirdar) major general Horatio Herbert Kitchener and a Sudanese army of the Mahdist State, led by Abdallahi ibn Muhammad, the successor to the self-proclaimed Mahdi, Muhammad Ahmad. The battle took place on 2 September 1898, at Kerreri, 11 kilometres (6.8 mi) north of Omdurman.

Following the establishment of the Mahdist State in Sudan, and the subsequent threat to the regional status quo and to British-occupied Egypt, the British government decided to send an expeditionary force with the task of overthrowing the Khalifa. The commander of the force, Sir Herbert Kitchener, was also seeking revenge for the death of General Gordon, who had been killed when a Mahdist army captured Khartoum thirteen years earlier.3 On the morning of 2 September, some 35,000–50,000 Sudanese tribesmen under Abdullah attacked the British lines in a disastrous series of charges; later that morning the 21st Lancers charged and defeated another force that appeared on the British right flank. Among those present was 23-year-old soldier and reporter Winston Churchill as well as a young Captain Douglas Haig.4

The victory of the British–Egyptian force was a demonstration of the superiority of a highly disciplined army equipped with modern rifles, machine guns, and artillery over a force twice its size armed with older weapons, and marked the success of British efforts to reconquer Sudan. Following the Battle of Umm Diwaykarat a year later, the remaining Mahdist forces were defeated and Anglo-Egyptian Sudan was established.  read more

Code: 25148

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Very Rare Antique 1850's 'Lancaster Patent' Two-Band Oval Bore Rifle-Musket 50 Bore Lancaster’s Patent Royal Engineers Rifle!

Very Rare Antique 1850's 'Lancaster Patent' Two-Band Oval Bore Rifle-Musket 50 Bore Lancaster’s Patent Royal Engineers Rifle!

An antique extremely rare and highly desirable Two-Band Rifle-Musket by Charles Lancaster, manufactured in London, England circa 1850's. In simply fabulous condition for its age. Charles William Lancaster (1820-1878) was devoted to his craft and was among the best England had to offer in the field of firearms making and invention. It was around the year 1850, when he conceived the idea of the oval bore. Indeed, it is very slightly oval, almost imperceptibly and the rifling is very subtle and this rifle could easily be mistaken for a smooth bore. The rifling is also “gain twist”, meaning that the twist gets faster as the projectile approaches the muzzle. He believed that the oval bore was the future form all rifles and cannons should take due to the design’s inherent ability to mitigate the fowling that came from using black powder, as well as their accuracy. He would put his idea to the test when he entered the government trials for what would become the Pattern 1853. He would spend much of 1852 and 1853 in doing so. His oval bore proved more accurate and less prone to foul than the competition, though the very subtle rifling was prone to wear out sooner with much use than conventional rifling. His system was not ultimately adopted for the Pattern 1853 infantry rifle-musket, but it was adopted in smaller numbers for sapper muskets.

This example is a 2-band rifle, the type which could have been made and sold for the Royal Engineers, Sappers and Miners, and volunteer units during this period, but this is a particularly rare chequered stock officer’s version, with a name engraved silver cartouche.

The Volunteer Movement was a response to the Crimean War as well as heightened tensions between England and France and the outbreak of war between France & Austria. England had a lot of territory to cover between the British Isles and its colonies, and there was imminent risk of being pulled into another conflict. This was a popular movement to create home defence. These had a great deal of autonomy initially, though many were eventually folded into the regular British Army. The rifle has fantastic sights stamped with Enfield inspector stamp.

We bought the entire small collection from the widow of a 'Best of British Empire Rifles and Bayonets, Both British and German' collector, who acquired them over the past 40 years, and only ever kept the very best he could afford to keep. Act fast they are selling really fast, three rifles and four bayonets and a cutlass have sold today alone. Top quality and condition,19th and 20th century scarce British and German collectables are always the most desirable of all.  read more

Code: 25145

2750.00 GBP