Antique Arms & Militaria

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An Extra Fine Condition Classic, Cased Pair of Late 18th to Early 19th Century Damascus Barrelled Duelling Pistols by Finest London Maker. Original Mahoghany Case with Tools and Accessories

An Extra Fine Condition Classic, Cased Pair of Late 18th to Early 19th Century Damascus Barrelled Duelling Pistols by Finest London Maker. Original Mahoghany Case with Tools and Accessories

A superb cased pair, in original case, very similar and from the same design, and form as another very fine cased pair, commissioned from the same finest maker in London, in circa 1800, and formerly in the Billionaire J.P.Morgan's Family Collection.

J. P. Morgan was a 19th century and early 20th century world renown American banker and philanthropist, he was subsequently categorised as America's greatest banker, whose reorganising skills and actions, in the great panic of 1907, saved America's monetary system

The famed gunsmith (1790-1841), produced finest flintlock guns in High Holborn London, from 1793-1839. her was Gun maker to the Duke of Kent, Prince Edward and King William IV.

Browned octagonal smooth 16 bore barrels are marked “London” on tops. Locks with original case hardening, waterproof pans, bridled roller frizzens, chamfered lockplates with rebated tails, and high breasted cocks with open centres, are fitted with sliding safeties, and are engraved with feather flourishes and name under pans on the lock face. Traditional English style walnut stocks that have wraparound micro checkering with mullered borders on bag grips. “Stand of Arms”engraved trigger guards have stylized pineapple finials, and fabulous original mirror blueing. Stocks attach to the barrels with two sliding barrel slides. Horn tipped rosewood ramrods are held by two nicely filed, beaded, steel pipes. Both ramrods have steel, ball extractor worms. Original mahogany case has dual pivoting hook closure, and inlet foldaway handle. The interior is lined in traditional and original green pill-napped cloth, with maker paper label on lid depicting pair of gentlemen gunners and their dogs. Case contains leather covered duelling pistol 'powder and ball' powder flask, loading rod with mushroom tip, Covered compartments with turned brass knobs on covers, for the containing of flints and balls and screw thread from the single top jaw screw.

Excellent condition overall. Stocks are excellent, retaining most of their original finish, edges and checkering sharp and very crisp, with a number of small use surface dents, handling marks. Locks and frizzens are crisp, one top jaw screw now lacking half thread of the screw. Case is very fine retaining most of its original finish with small slice out by interior by the front right retaining hook. Interior cloth is fine with light marks and soiling from contact with guns and accessories. Label is fine, slightly foxed and dented from contact with frizzen springs. Accessories are all fine.

He was born to Thomas and Elizabeth in 1772, at Croscombe in Somerset. Nothing is known of his early years, but in 1792 his name appears in a Holborn rate book for the address of two hundred and thirty three High Holborn. This address had, until the latter part of the eighteenth century been occupied by a John Field and his father–in–law John Clarke. Alongside his name in the rate book was that of ‘Widow Field’, a jeweller. At this time William was aged only 20 years and it is not fully understood under what pretext he started at this address. It is probable that he had been working at the location as an apprentice silversmith, as a business had operated there under the names of ‘Field & Clarke, silversmiths’ between the years 1784 and 1793.

The process of the name changing from Field and Clarke to his started when John Field died around 1790. Entries with his name are recorded in the Holborn rate books from 1783 until 1790. In 1791 his name is still listed, but underlined and the word ‘Widw’ inserted. Records suggest John Clarke survived until at least May 1793, but it is probable he died around this time.

John Field’s marriage to Sarah Clarke had resulted in one surviving child, also called John born circa 1779 in the County of Middlesex. Following the death of John the elder William Parker married his widow Sarah on the 1 July 1792. It is not unusual for a new business to trade under an established name and this probably accounts for the name Field surviving in various forms for a few more years. Entries in trade directories confirm that by 1796-1797 William was operating under his own name as a sole trader, a situation that would continue until his death in 1841.

John Field the younger is often referred to as William’s ‘son-in-law’, but was in fact his step-son. In the nineteenth century the term ‘in-law’ meant related by marriage, but also extended to children, which is not the case now, when we would use the term step-son. William and Sarah appear to have had no other children, but John did marry and went on to have seven children of his own, three boys and four girls. The two eldest boys, John William Parker Field and William Shakespeare Field were to follow their father and grandfather’s trade as gun makers.

As a gun maker he was a well known for producing a range of weapons from standard issue items to the finest duelling pistols. He later started to produce truncheons and other articles such as handcuffs, swords and rattles, and had the major contracts to supply arms and truncheons to the Metropolitan police of London.

In the gallery is a coloured engraving of a famous news event in 1789. A representation (not caricatured) of the duel between the Duke of York and Lennox on Wimbledon Common on 26 May 1789. Lennox (left) fires at the Duke, who fires in the air. Above the Duke's head is written (in ink) 'Fire again Sir'. The two seconds stand beside their principals: Lord Winchilsea (left) and Lord Rawdon (right). In the distance is a man on horseback. Trees and grass form a background.

Every single item from The Lanes Armoury is accompanied by our unique Certificate of Authenticity. Part of our continued dedication to maintain the standards forged by us over the past 100 years of trading  read more

Code: 24937

19995.00 GBP

A Simply Stunning Ancient Roman Museum Grade Fine  Gold Seal Ring with Intaglio Portrait Engraved Garnet Gem Stone  2nd to 3rd Century A.D. Likely a Depiction of an Emperor Such As Hadrian, Marcus Aurelius, Lucius Verus, or Even A Parthian Vassal King.

A Simply Stunning Ancient Roman Museum Grade Fine Gold Seal Ring with Intaglio Portrait Engraved Garnet Gem Stone 2nd to 3rd Century A.D. Likely a Depiction of an Emperor Such As Hadrian, Marcus Aurelius, Lucius Verus, or Even A Parthian Vassal King.

A museum grade, around 1900 year old pure gold ancient Roman intaglio carved garnet gemstone seal ring, depicting a profile carving, possibly of an Emperor such as Verus, or vassal King of Parthia. Possibly as a celebration of Verus’s ‘Triumph’ from the Parthian War. Classified by the seminal classification of ancient ring forms, by Dr. Martin Henig, as Ancient Roman, Henig type II

The Roman triumph was one of ancient Rome’s most important civic and sacred institutions. These spectacular processions were celebrations of Rome’s military victories, the courage of its soldiers, and the favour of the gods. They were also one of the highest honors a Roman man could achieve: designated a triumphator, he was awarded a grand procession through the imperial capital. The lavish parade of prisoners and captured treasures was sure to guarantee the eternal fame of the conquering general. Over time, the triumph became an important tool in the manipulation of Roman politics.

Made and worn by the highest ranking Roman, possibly a member of the Imperial household at the time from Marcus Aurelias, Lucius Verus, & Commodus, into the early next century.

Rings were one of the most popular pieces of jewellery in Roman culture. Under the Republic the wearing of gold rings was exclusively reserved to certain classes of persons or for specific occasions. In the late 3rd century BC only senators and knights equo publico had this privilege. Towards the end of the Republic, gold rings were also bestowed on civilians. Under the Roman Empire gold rings, although still regarded as a privilege and awarded as a military distinction

During the era of dual Emperors Marcus Aurelius, and Lucius Verus, 161 to 180 ad, the last part of his reign was dramatically represented in the blockbuster film 'Gladiator', starring Richard Harris as the Emperor Marcus Aurelias. He acceded to the throne of Emperor alongside his adoptive brother, who reigned under the name Lucius Verus. Under his rule the Roman Empire witnessed heavy military conflict. In the East, the Romans fought successfully with a revitalised Parthian Empire and the rebel Kingdom of Armenia. Marcus defeated the Marcomanni, Quadi, and Sarmatian Iazyges in the Marcomannic Wars; however, these and other Germanic peoples began to represent a troubling reality for the Empire. Ultimately, the Romans were victorious in the Parthian War of 161-167 CE. After the sacking of Ctesiphon and Seleucia, Lucius Verus took the title Parthicus Maximus. As a feature of his imperial titulature, the epithet conveyed his military might and power. But the question remains: to what extent can the Roman victory over the Parthian Empire be attributed to Verus?
Indeed, much of the successes the Romans enjoyed in this eastern war surely belong to the supremely able retinue of generals and administrators who were with Verus at the time. Regardless, upon his return from the campaign, Verus was awarded a triumph, the traditional celebration of Roman military conquest that had been used since the Republican era. This was to be the high point of Verus’ imperial story, however. In 169 CE, as he was journeying back from the Danubian frontier — where he had been fighting in the Marcomannic wars with Marcus Aurelius — Verus suddenly fell ill and died. It is highly probable, according to historians, that Verus was a victim of the pestilence that his soldiers had carried back to the empire with them from the Parthian War.

Commodus. the successor and son of Emperor Antoninus Pius,, was the Roman emperor who ruled from 177 to 192. He served jointly with his father Marcus Aurelius from 177 until the latter's death in 180, and thereafter he reigned alone until his assassination. His reign is commonly thought of as marking the end of a golden period of peace in the history of the Roman Empire, known as the Pax Romana.
Commodus became the youngest emperor and consul up to that point, at the age of 16. Throughout his reign, Commodus entrusted the management of affairs to his palace chamberlain and praetorian prefects, named Saoterus, Perennis and Cleander.

Commodus's assassination in 192, by a wrestler in the bath, marked the end of the Nerva–Antonine dynasty. He was succeeded by Pertinax, the first emperor in the tumultuous Year of the Five Emperors.

Jewellery in the Roman Republic
The core ideologies of the Roman Republic, centred around moderation and restraint, meant that elaborate jewellery was relatively unpopular until the transformation to imperial rule. The law of the Twelve Tables in the 5th century BC, limited the amount of gold which might have been buried with the dead. The Lex Oppia, 3rd century BC, fixed at half of an ounce the amount of gold which a Roman lady might have worn. During the Roman Empire, however, jewellery became a public display of wealth and power for the elite.
Rings of the higher ranks were often embellished with intaglios, cameos and precious gemstones. Mythology and Roman history were used as a repertoire of decorative themes. Roman rings featuring carved gemstones, such as carnelian, garnet or chalcedony, were often engraved with the depiction of deities, allegories and zoomorphic creatures.

1 inch across, UK size H1/2, {measured on the round inside the oval} 9.6 grams, approx 22 carat gold 91.16% Gold, 6.66% silver, 1.93% copper, which is a typical consistency of ancient Roman gold determined by x-ray flourescence analysis with Oxford Instruments in 2017
As with all our items it comes complete with our certificate of authenticity.  read more

Code: 24779

8950.00 GBP

A Stunning Rarity, A Solid Silver Roman Military Ring, Possibly of a Tribune or Legatus, or Even the Personal Guard of the Emperor Contantine Ist, of the Roman Empire. Engraved with the Personal Wreathed Labarum Standard of Constantine the Great

A Stunning Rarity, A Solid Silver Roman Military Ring, Possibly of a Tribune or Legatus, or Even the Personal Guard of the Emperor Contantine Ist, of the Roman Empire. Engraved with the Personal Wreathed Labarum Standard of Constantine the Great

Engraved with the Personal ‘Wreathed Labarum’ Standard of Constantine the Great.
A Labarum engraved ring of Constantine Ist's Military standard showing the symbol 'Chi Rho' surrounded by the victory symbol laurel wreath. As it is a solid silver ring it likely demonstrates it was awarded and worn by an Imperial Roman military commander of high rank. Roman bronze rings and bracelets were awarded and allowed to be worn by the Legionary or Centurion, but the silver grade was only for the ranks of such as the Centurion, Tribune or Legate. Plus, as the Emperors symbol is framed in the engraving within a laurel wreath of victory, it may most likely have been awarded to the highest rank of Tribune [a wide stripe Tribune] or, a Legate, after a great victory in combat. Possibly after the Battles of Livium Bridge against Maxentius and the Battle of Chrysopolis against Emperor Licinius in the East, The religious aspect of the conflict was reflected in Licinius drawing up his battle lines with images of the pagan gods of Rome prominently displayed, whilst Constantine's army fought under his talismanic Christian standard, the labarum. Licinius had developed such a superstitious dread of the Labarum he forbade his troops from attacking it, or even looking directly at it.

Constantine’s saw his divine message from Christ, it was;
‘In hoc signo vinces’ – “In this sign, you will win”

The Labarum was a square legion's banner of the 4th century Roman Empire, with golden fringes, hung on a cross beam, on which was embedded the Chi-Rho Christogram, and sometimes also the image of Christ in purple and gold. It was introduced by Emperor Constantine the Great. It was the banner of the Roman legions but used only when the emperor was with the army.

According to an account by Eusebius of Caesarea, before the battle at the Milvian Bridge (October 28, 312 CE) Constantine the Great had a vision that allowed him to win. Around noon, he was to see a luminous cross in the sky, and under it, an inscription in Greek – “You will overcome this”. Better known in Latin translation In hoc signo vinces – “In this sign, you will win”. The next night in a dream, Christ commanded him to use the sign of the cross against his enemies. Eusebius then describes labarum (legionary’s banner) with the sign of Chi Rho.

The Labarum, became the sacred military standard of the Christian Roman emperors, first used by Constantine I in the early part of the 4th century AD. The Labarum—a Christian version of the vexillum, the military standard used earlier in the Roman Empire—incorporated the Chi-Rho, the monogram of Christ, in a golden wreath atop the staff. The flag was made of purple silk (purple dye being at this time a rarity derived from a shellfish of the genus Murex) richly embroidered with gold. Although usually suspended from a horizontal bar, it appears to have been displayed occasionally by fastening one of its sides to its staff.

Constantine was the first emperor to convert to Christianity. He ended the policy of persecuting Christians and in 313 CE issued the Edict of Milan, proclaiming the freedom to profess this religion.

A silver ring of a hoop form, with nicely shaped shoulders, circular bezel nicely engraved with the Emperor's Chi Rho cross, within a laurel wreath roundel. In the gallery is the Labarum of Constantine I, reconstructed from the depiction on a follis Roman coin, minted c. 337. The three dots represent "medallions" which are said to have shown portraits of Constantine and his sons. plus another Roman coin showing his standard, an artistic representation of the Emperor's Labarum, and an original roman carved marble panel, showing Emperor Constantine holding his personal standard adorned with his Chi Rho symbol at the very top.

Battle of Milvian Bridge, (October 28, 312 CE), major battle in a Roman civil war between Constantine I and Maxentius. After the collapse of the Roman Empire’s Second Tetrarchy, Constantine and Maxentius asserted competing claims to the imperial throne. At Maxentius’s goading, Constantine invaded the Italian Peninsula. A lightning campaign saw Maxentius killed in battle at the Milvian Bridge on the outskirts of Rome. Constantine’s victory confirmed his role as ruler of the Western Empire. According to ancient sources, Constantine converted to Christianity just before the battle. The Battle of the Milvian Bridge may have concluded Constantine’s civil war with Maxentius, but it was not his final battle. In the East, Licinius conquered his rival Maximinus Daia’s lands. However, he held them only briefly before Constantine invaded, first in 314 and again in 316. Constantine seemingly eschewed any subtlety of manoeuvre, he launched a single massive frontal assault on Licinius' troops and routed them.[6][8] He won a decisive victory in what was a very large-scale battle. According to the fifth-century historian Zosimus, “There was great slaughter at Chrysopolis.” Emperor Licinius was reported to have lost 25,000 to 30,000 men, with thousands more breaking and running in flight. Licinius managed to escape and gathered around 30,000 of his surviving troops at the city of Nicomedia.

Recognising that his surviving forces in Nicomedia could not stand against Constantine's victorious army, Licinius was persuaded to throw himself on the mercy of his enemy. Constantia, Constantine's half-sister and Licinius' wife, acted as intermediary. Initially, yielding to the pleas of his sister, Constantine spared the life of his brother-in-law, but some months later he ordered his execution, thereby breaking his solemn oath. This occurred because Licinius was suspected of treasonable actions, and the army command pressed for his execution. A year later, Constantine's nephew, the younger Licinius, also fell victim to the emperor's anger or suspicions. He was executed in 326 and had his name expunged from official inscriptions.

In defeating his last foe, Licinius, Constantine became the sole emperor of the Roman Empire; the first such since the elevation of Maximian to the status of Augustus by Diocletian in April 286. After his conquest of the eastern portion of the Roman Empire, Constantine made the momentous decision to give the east its own capital, and the empire as a whole its second. Constantine was now the undisputed ruler of the entire Roman Empire. As thanks for his good fortune and proof of his conviction, he would make Christianity the state’s most favoured religion. But Constantine would also abandon the city whose conquest had cemented his conversion. The capital would be relocated east to the city of Byzantium (renamed Constantinople, modern Istanbul). Rome would be left to crumble, and with it the Western Empire.

As with all our items it comes complete with our certificate of authenticity


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Code: 24628

1250.00 GBP

A Fabulous & Rare Original Imperial Roman Gladiator's Bronze Ring, Featuring A ‘Coliseum' Barbary Lion Fighting a Stallion  Around 1700 Years Old & In Superb Condition

A Fabulous & Rare Original Imperial Roman Gladiator's Bronze Ring, Featuring A ‘Coliseum' Barbary Lion Fighting a Stallion Around 1700 Years Old & In Superb Condition

Featuring an amazingly detailed intaglio hand engraving of a Barbary lion, upon the back of a stallion, in a gladiatorial arena combat pose, from such as the gladiator's arena in the Colosseum in Rome, from the time of the Emperor's Marcus Aurelias and Commodus until emperor Constantine.

Acquired with another gladiator's ring, with a reined horse, from a collector, {now sold}

The era superbly depicted in Sir Ridley Scott's blockbuster movie, Gladiator, starring Russell Crowe, up to the era of emperor Constantine the Great.

In copper bronze with great, natural age patination. By far the greatest percentage of rings from the Roman era were engraved in the stylised form, but a very small percent, perhaps less that .01 of a percent, were engraved in the realism form. This is one of those rare types of more realistic engravings. Worn either by a higher ranking, possibly freed gladiator, or, possibly an owner of gladiators, as played by Oliver Reed in the Gladiator movie the world famous combat slaves of Rome.

The wearing of the ring was the prerogative alone of Roman citizens or those of high rank and esteem, that some gladiators always aspired to but rarely achieved due to their short life span within their violent craft. However some did achieve such great success and were rewarded with riches, freedom and the right to wear the traditional Roman bronze status ring.

Another picture in the gallery is of a well-preserved fresco, recently unearthed in Pompeii—the Roman city razed by Mount Vesuvius’ eruption in 79 A.D.—it depicts the final act of a gladiator fight: As one combatant begs for mercy, the victorious warrior awaits instructions on whether to kill or spare his opponent.

A gladiator was an armed combatant who entertained audiences in the Roman Republic and Roman Empire in violent confrontations with other gladiators, wild animals, and condemned criminals. Some gladiators were volunteers who risked their lives and their legal and social standing by appearing in the arena. Most were despised as slaves, schooled under harsh conditions, socially marginalised, and segregated even in death. However, success in the arena could mean riches and fame beyond their wildest dream. For many this was the greatest escape from slavery there was.

Irrespective of their origin, gladiators offered spectators an example of Rome's martial ethics and, in fighting or dying well, they could inspire admiration and popular acclaim. They were celebrated in high and low art, and their value as entertainers was commemorated in precious and commonplace objects throughout the Roman world.

The origin of gladiatorial combat is open to debate. There is evidence of it in funeral rites during the Punic Wars of the 3rd century BC, and thereafter it rapidly became an essential feature of politics and social life in the Roman world. Its popularity led to its use in ever more lavish and costly games.

The gladiator games lasted for nearly a thousand years, reaching their peak between the 1st century BC and the 2nd century AD the time of Emperor Commodus. Christians disapproved of the games because they involved idolatrous pagan rituals, and the popularity of gladiatorial contests declined in the fifth century, leading to their disappearance.

Marcus Aurelius acceded to the throne alongside his adoptive brother, who reigned under the name Lucius Verus. Under his rule the Roman Empire witnessed heavy military conflict. In the East, the Romans fought successfully with a revitalized Parthian Empire and the rebel Kingdom of Armenia. Marcus defeated the Marcomanni, Quadi, and Sarmatian Iazyges in the Marcomannic Wars; however, these and other Germanic peoples began to represent a troubling reality for the Empire.

Commodus was the Roman emperor who ruled from 177 to 192. He served jointly with his father Marcus Aurelius from 177 until the latter's death in 180, and thereafter he reigned alone until his assassination. His reign is commonly thought of as marking the end of a golden period of peace in the history of the Roman Empire, known as the Pax Romana.
Commodus became the youngest emperor and consul up to that point, at the age of 16. During his solo reign, the Roman Empire enjoyed reduced military conflict compared with the reign of Marcus Aurelius. Intrigues and conspiracies abounded, leading Commodus to revert to an increasingly dictatorial style of leadership, culminating in his creating a deific personality cult, with his performing as a gladiator in the Colosseum. Throughout his reign, Commodus entrusted the management of affairs to his palace chamberlain and praetorian prefects, named Saoterus, Perennis and Cleander.

Commodus's assassination in 192, by a wrestler in the bath, marked the end of the Nerva–Antonine dynasty. He was succeeded by Pertinax, the first emperor in the tumultuous Year of the Five Emperors.

Not only did the ‘games’ centre on gladiators, they also included animals fighting other animals, such as bears fighting lions or lions vs horses. Since ancient times horses have been trained for combat, not just to be non-fearful in carrying its rider into the melee of hand to hand combat, but to kill any adversary, albeit a man or another animal.

Just around 0.75 inch across. A sound piece in a wearable size

As with all our items it comes complete with our certificate of authenticity  read more

Code: 24792

1295.00 GBP

A Most Interesting & Intriguing Very Senior French Colonel or General's Epee Shell Guard, Lost From His Epee Sword Hilt, Likely Broken in Hand To Hand Combat on The Field of Waterloo & Recovered at La Haye Sainte, Waterloo

A Most Interesting & Intriguing Very Senior French Colonel or General's Epee Shell Guard, Lost From His Epee Sword Hilt, Likely Broken in Hand To Hand Combat on The Field of Waterloo & Recovered at La Haye Sainte, Waterloo

A small piece, yet with an incredible potential historical context, within the most significant single battle during the Napoleonic Wars, culminating in the Battle of Waterloo, the conclusion of the War of the 100 Days.

A French general’s sword from this period would be worth many thousands if not tens of thousands especially if his identity was known. So a small significant piece is a very affordable piece of such a rare artefact.

A picture in the gallery by renown artist Jacques Louis David, of Napoleonic War General, Étienne-Maurice Gérard, wearing his very same type of sword, from which this shell would have come originally. Possibly of a high ranked French Colonel or General, using his epee in combat at Waterloo, that had received an impact, which resulted in the breaking off his hilt's shell guard.

Junior French infantry officers swords will have regimental devices upon their sword shell guards, only the high ranks have extravagant sword hilt shell designs of their choice.

Before lost on the battlefield it would have shone like gold, covered in hammered mercurial gilt. It has superb quality detailing of a floral display with a trumpet, typical of a French generals sword of the time, such as General Gerard. His sword hilt and very similar shell guard are shown in the gallery.

A whole and perfect sword of this type, recovered from Waterloo, in original condition, would cost many thousands of pounds, and if used by a known general of Napoleon, likely many hundreds of thousands of pounds. So, to acquire just a part of such a fabulous sword, of a very high ranking officer, that was actually damaged and broken off, and recovered from the battle site, is simply a unique opportunity, not seen for over 200 years.

Recovered alongside the farm’s cast iron fireback {now sold} and some relic items, thimbles, crucifixes finger rings of combat, plus rare grenades {now all sold}, cannon balls, swords etc {some now sold}. Farm glazed tiles {only one now remaining} discovered around La Haye Sainte (named either after Jesus Christ's crown of thorns or a bramble hedge round a field nearby).

All our relics are exactly as they {similar examples recovered from the battle site } also appear in the book, ‘Waterloo Relics’ by Bernard & Lachaux, see photos in the gallery.

It is a walled farmhouse compound at the foot of an escarpment on the Charleroi-Brussels road in Belgium. It has changed very little since it played a crucial part in the Battle of Waterloo on 18 June 1815.

La Haye Sainte was defended by about 400 King's German Legion troops during the Battle of Waterloo. They were hopelessly outnumbered by attacking French troops but held out until the late afternoon when they retired because their ammunition had run out. If Napoleon Bonaparte's army had captured La Haye Sainte earlier in the day, almost certainly he would have broken through the allied centre and defeated the Duke of Wellington's army.

The capture of La Haye Sainte in the early evening then gave the French the advantage of a defensible position from which to launch a potentially decisive attack on the Allied centre. However, Napoleon was too late—by this time, Blücher and the Prussian army had arrived on the battlefield and the outnumbered French army was defeated.

Strategic importance

A view of the battlefield from the Lion's mound. On the top right are the buildings of La Haye Sainte. This view looks east, with Allied forces behind the road to the left (north) and French forces out of shot to the right(south)
The road leads from La Belle Alliance, where Napoleon had his headquarters on the morning of the battle, through where the centre of the French front line was located, to a crossroads on the ridge which is at the top of the escarpment and then on to Brussels. The Duke of Wellington placed the majority of his forces on either side of the Brussels road behind the ridge on the Brussels side. This kept most of his forces out of sight of the French artillery.

During the night from the 17th to the 18th, the main door to the courtyard of the farm was used as firewood by the occupying troops. Therefore, when the King's German Legion (KGL) was stationed in the farm at the morning of the battle they had to hastily fortify La Haye Sainte.

The troops were the 2nd Light Battalion KGL commanded by Major Georg Baring, and part of the 1st Light Battalion KGL. During the battle, they were supported by the 1/2 Nassau Regiment and the light company of the 5th Line Battalion KGL. The majority of these troops were armed with the Baker rifle with grooved barrels, as opposed to the normal Brown Bess musket of the British Army. The French troops also used muskets which were quicker to load than the Baker rifle but the latter was more accurate and had about twice the range of a musket.

Both Napoleon and Wellington made crucial mistakes about La Haye Sainte as it was fought over and around during most of the day. Napoleon failed to allocate enough forces to take the farm earlier in the day while Wellington only realised the strategic value of the position when it was almost too late.


As with all our items, every piece will be accompanied by our fully detailed Certificate of Authenticity read more  read more

Code: 25063

395.00 GBP

A Waterloo Battlefield Recovered Relic, and Officer's Uniform Buckle

A Waterloo Battlefield Recovered Relic, and Officer's Uniform Buckle

Recovered alongside the farm’s cast iron fireback {now sold} and some relic items, thimbles, crucifixes finger rings of combat, plus rare grenades {now all sold}, cannon balls, swords etc {some now sold}. Farm glazed tiles {only one now remaining} discovered around La Haye Sainte (named either after Jesus Christ's crown of thorns or a bramble hedge round a field nearby).

All our relics are exactly as they {similar examples recovered from the battle site } also appear in the book ‘Waterloo Relics’ by Bernard & Lachaux, see photos in the gallery.

It is a walled farmhouse compound at the foot of an escarpment on the Charleroi-Brussels road in Belgium. It has changed very little since it played a crucial part in the Battle of Waterloo on 18 June 1815.

La Haye Sainte was defended by about 400 King's German Legion troops during the Battle of Waterloo. They were hopelessly outnumbered by attacking French troops but held out until the late afternoon when they retired because their ammunition had run out. If Napoleon Bonaparte's army had captured La Haye Sainte earlier in the day, almost certainly he would have broken through the allied centre and defeated the Duke of Wellington's army.

The capture of La Haye Sainte in the early evening then gave the French the advantage of a defensible position from which to launch a potentially decisive attack on the Allied centre. However, Napoleon was too late—by this time, Blücher and the Prussian army had arrived on the battlefield and the outnumbered French army was defeated.

Strategic importance

A view of the battlefield from the Lion's mound. On the top right are the buildings of La Haye Sainte. This view looks east, with Allied forces behind the road to the left (north) and French forces out of shot to the right(south)
The road leads from La Belle Alliance, where Napoleon had his headquarters on the morning of the battle, through where the centre of the French front line was located, to a crossroads on the ridge which is at the top of the escarpment and then on to Brussels. The Duke of Wellington placed the majority of his forces on either side of the Brussels road behind the ridge on the Brussels side. This kept most of his forces out of sight of the French artillery.

During the night from the 17th to the 18th, the main door to the courtyard of the farm was used as firewood by the occupying troops. Therefore, when the King's German Legion (KGL) was stationed in the farm at the morning of the battle they had to hastily fortify La Haye Sainte.

The troops were the 2nd Light Battalion KGL commanded by Major Georg Baring, and part of the 1st Light Battalion KGL. During the battle, they were supported by the 1/2 Nassau Regiment and the light company of the 5th Line Battalion KGL. The majority of these troops were armed with the Baker rifle with grooved barrels, as opposed to the normal Brown Bess musket of the British Army. The French troops also used muskets which were quicker to load than the Baker rifle but the latter was more accurate and had about twice the range of a musket.

Both Napoleon and Wellington made crucial mistakes about La Haye Sainte as it was fought over and around during most of the day. Napoleon failed to allocate enough forces to take the farm earlier in the day while Wellington only realised the strategic value of the position when it was almost too late.


As with all our items, every piece will be accompanied by our fully detailed Certificate of Authenticity  read more

Code: 25062

140.00 GBP

An Original British Soldier’s Half-Thimble,  From a Soldiers Pouch Called His ‘Housewife’ Recovered From The Field of Battle at Waterloo

An Original British Soldier’s Half-Thimble, From a Soldiers Pouch Called His ‘Housewife’ Recovered From The Field of Battle at Waterloo

Although one never sees them today, the half-thimble was popular in the early 1700's and 1800's especially for soldiers, as it could fit easily larger fingers, as the regular thimble was usually made to fit ladies fingers.

Recovered alongside the farm’s cast iron fireback {now sold} and some relic items, thimbles, crucifixes finger rings of combat, plus rare grenades {two sold only 1 remaining}, cannon balls, swords etc {some now sold}. Farm glazed tiles {only one now remaining} discovered around La Haye Sainte (named either after Jesus Christ's crown of thorns or a bramble hedge round a field nearby).

All our relics are exactly as they {similar examples recovered from the battle site } also appear in the book ‘Waterloo Relics’ by Bernard & Lachaux, see photos in the gallery.

In the Napoleonic Wars every soldier was required to keep upon his person, a ‘housewife’, a small kit comprising needle, thread on a cotton reel, and a half or full thimble. Apparently they are no longer called a ‘housewife’

It is a walled farmhouse compound at the foot of an escarpment on the Charleroi-Brussels road in Belgium. It has changed very little since it played a crucial part in the Battle of Waterloo on 18 June 1815.

La Haye Sainte was defended by about 400 King's German Legion troops during the Battle of Waterloo. They were hopelessly outnumbered by attacking French troops but held out until the late afternoon when they retired because their ammunition had run out. If Napoleon Bonaparte's army had captured La Haye Sainte earlier in the day, almost certainly he would have broken through the allied centre and defeated the Duke of Wellington's army.

The capture of La Haye Sainte in the early evening then gave the French the advantage of a defensible position from which to launch a potentially decisive attack on the Allied centre. However, Napoleon was too late—by this time, Blücher and the Prussian army had arrived on the battlefield and the outnumbered French army was defeated.

Strategic importance

A view of the battlefield from the Lion's mound. On the top right are the buildings of La Haye Sainte. This view looks east, with Allied forces behind the road to the left (north) and French forces out of shot to the right(south)
The road leads from La Belle Alliance, where Napoleon had his headquarters on the morning of the battle, through where the centre of the French front line was located, to a crossroads on the ridge which is at the top of the escarpment and then on to Brussels. The Duke of Wellington placed the majority of his forces on either side of the Brussels road behind the ridge on the Brussels side. This kept most of his forces out of sight of the French artillery.

During the night from the 17th to the 18th, the main door to the courtyard of the farm was used as firewood by the occupying troops. Therefore, when the King's German Legion (KGL) was stationed in the farm at the morning of the battle they had to hastily fortify La Haye Sainte.

The troops were the 2nd Light Battalion KGL commanded by Major Georg Baring, and part of the 1st Light Battalion KGL. During the battle, they were supported by the 1/2 Nassau Regiment and the light company of the 5th Line Battalion KGL. The majority of these troops were armed with the Baker rifle with grooved barrels, as opposed to the normal Brown Bess musket of the British Army. The French troops also used muskets which were quicker to load than the Baker rifle but the latter was more accurate and had about twice the range of a musket.

Both Napoleon and Wellington made crucial mistakes about La Haye Sainte as it was fought over and around during most of the day. Napoleon failed to allocate enough forces to take the farm earlier in the day while Wellington only realised the strategic value of the position when it was almost too late.


As with all our items, every piece will be accompanied by our fully detailed Certificate of Authenticity  read more

Code: 25061

140.00 GBP

An 18th Century Typical Pirate Form Corsairs Long Barrel Holster Pistol Likely a Balkan Maker, a Great Gift Idea For Christmas

An 18th Century Typical Pirate Form Corsairs Long Barrel Holster Pistol Likely a Balkan Maker, a Great Gift Idea For Christmas

A very inexpensive, original, 18th century pirate pistol. Obvious signs of battle close combat use, hence the price, but this is a fascinating piece of piratical history. What a fabulous gift this could be from the original seafaring days of galleons and pirates from the Spanish Maine.

Finely carved walnut stock, long holster barrel beautifully chisseled and inlaid with poincon. chisseled brass buttcap, traditional early banana shaped lock. An Italianate style flintlock, made in the area of the Mediterranean, used throughout Europe, the Caribbean and the Americas in the 18th and continually of to the early 19th century in the Napoelonic Wars and throughout the Mediterranean and Ottoman Empire. This is exactly the type of flintlock one sees, and in fact expects to see, in all the old Hollywood 'Pirate' films.

A beautifully sprauncy sidearm, with long barrel. This is an original, honest and impressive antique flintlock that rekindles the little boy in all of us who once dreamt of being Errol Flynn, Swash-Buckling across the Spanish Maine under the Jolly Roger. This super piece may very well have seen service with one of the old Corsairs of the Barbary Coast, in a tall masted Galleon, slipping it's way down the coast of the Americas, to find it's way home to Port Royal, or some other nefarious port of call in the Caribbean. It is exactly the very form of weapon that was in use in the days of the Caribbean pirates and privateers, as their were no regular patterns of course.

It bears all the usual signs of close hand-to-hand combat signs as pistols of this type were fired and then swapped hands, to be used as clubs, alongside the pirates cutlass. Priced accordingly, at only around a third of the price an undamaged similar example might be! But, absolutely all part of its character, so at all not detrimental to its historical context. Single side screw lacking, and contemporary combat service small elements of wood damage near the forend, replaced ramrod {now fixed in place}.  read more

Code: 23642

895.00 GBP

A Fabulous, Rare Early 19th Cent. British Explosive 10

A Fabulous, Rare Early 19th Cent. British Explosive 10" Mortar Bomb From the War of 1812 In America. Likely, Fomerly Part of The Armament of HMS Terror, During The Bombardment of Fort McHenry in Baltimore. The Battle Site of “The Star Spangled Banner”

One of four exceptionally rare 10" Royal Naval mortar balls we are delighted to have just acquired last week from our private historical Royal Naval collector in Plymouth, the same city where Admiral Cochrane, fleet commander at the attack on Fort McHenry, became Commander-in-Chief of the naval base in Plymouth, England, after the war of 1812. We now only have 3 remaining of these original iron bomb shells, one sold today, the first day it was posted on here.

They were apparently unloaded from ships of the line from Admiral Cochrane's returning fleet, supposedly in Plymouth, during the war of 1812 and the 90 pound bronze mortars were removed from his fleet. It is said the Admiral and his crew loathed and feared these particular huge mortars due to their likely hood of miss-fire. The 90 pounder shell had to be first primed, and then lit, before it entered the muzzle of the bronze cannon, that had previously been loaded with pounds of gunpowder, the cannon mortar was then lit and fired which thus ejected, with a massive force explosion, the explosive ball high into the sky to the centre of the enemy's ranks. However, the shell might have accidentally exploded while it was being manouvered, it might also have ignited the powder within the breech of the cannon, or, the fizzing mortar might have not have been ejected at all due to a cannon miss-fire. Any one of these horrifying events would be catastrophic, and the resulting explosion would be of of such magnitude it would likely have killed most on board, and probably sunk the vessel entirely with all hands. This a series of events that any ships captain or admiral would not consider to be entirely advantageous

The previous two 10” mortar bombs, that we had two years ago, were the very first we had had in 50 years. The first of those two we sold to an esteemed private museum in Florida USA, the other to an American private collector

We are not expecting ever to see any more of their like again. It would make a fabulous and impressive historical display piece of significant and particular Royal Naval and early American history interest

These 10" mortars explosive balls were fired by the 10" mortars used by Admiral Cochrane against Fort McHenry, Baltimore Harbour, and the resulting 10" mortar bomb shell's mid air explosions, against the backdrop of the US flag flying at Fort McHenry, Baltimore Harbour, inspired the patriotic anthem, the "Star Spangled Banner".

It was the sight of these very 10" mortar bombshells, that originally weighed around 90 pounds each, plus powder therein, that when they exploded over Fort McHenry in Harbour, it inspired Francis Scott Key to write his poem that became the US anthem.
Naturally, this is a perfectly intact surviving example, and one of the 10" mortar shells that either wasn't fired, or, failed to explode.

With Washington in ruins, the British next set their sights on Baltimore, then America’s third-largest city. Moving up the Chesapeake Bay to the mouth of the Patapsco River, they plotted a joint attack on Baltimore by land and water. On the morning of September 12, General Ross’s troops landed at North Point, Maryland, and progressed towards the city. They soon encountered the American forward line, part of an extensive network of defences established around Baltimore in anticipation of the British assault. During the skirmish with American troops, General Ross, so successful in the attack on Washington, was killed by a sharpshooter. Surprised by the strength of the American defences, British forces camped on the battlefield and waited for nightfall on September 13, planning to attempt another attack under cover of darkness.

Meanwhile, Britain’s naval force, buoyed by its earlier successful attack on Alexandria, Virginia, was poised to strike Fort McHenry and enter Baltimore Harbour. At 6:30 AM on September 13, 1814, Admiral Cochrane’s ships began a 25-hour bombardment of the fort. Rockets whistled through the air and burst into flame wherever they struck. Mortars fired 10- and 13-inch bombshells that exploded overhead in showers of fiery shrapnel. It is said many exploded too soon as the fuses were set too short, which created the firework effect. Major Armistead, commander of Fort McHenry and its defending force of one thousand troops, ordered his men to return fire, but their guns couldn’t reach the enemy’s ships. When British ships advanced on the afternoon of the 13th, however, American gunners badly damaged them, forcing them to pull back out of range. All through the night, Armistead’s men continued to hold the fort, refusing to surrender. That night British attempts at a diversionary attack also failed, and by dawn they had given up hope of taking the city. At 7:30 on the morning of September 14, Admiral Cochrane called an end to the bombardment, and the British fleet withdrew. The successful defense of Baltimore marked a turning point in the War of 1812. Three months later, on December 24, 1814, the Treaty of Ghent formally ended the war. "The Star-Spangled Banner" is the national anthem of the United States. The lyrics come from the "Defence of Fort M'Henry", a poem written on September 14, 1814, by 35-year-old lawyer and amateur poet Francis Scott Key after witnessing the bombardment of Fort McHenry by British ships of the Royal Navy in Baltimore Harbour during the Battle of Baltimore in the War of 1812. Key was inspired by the large U.S. flag, with 15 stars and 15 stripes, known as the Star-Spangled Banner, flying triumphantly above the fort during the U.S. victory. During the bombardment, HMS Terror and HMS Meteor provided some of the "bombs bursting in air".

The 15-star, 15-stripe "Star-Spangled Banner" that inspired the poem
Key was inspired by the U.S. victory and the sight of the large U.S. flag flying triumphantly above the fort. This flag, with fifteen stars and fifteen stripes, had been made by Mary Young Pickersgill together with other workers in her home on Baltimore's Pratt Street. The flag later came to be known as the Star-Spangled Banner, and is today on display in the National Museum of American History, a treasure of the Smithsonian Institution. It was restored in 1914 by Amelia Fowler, and again in 1998 as part of an ongoing conservation program. Pictures in the gallery of the siege from contemporary paintings and engravings, a commemorative stamp issued in 2014, and an original War of 1812 bronze British mortar now kept at Yorktown Visitor Centre, and a photo of the flag in the National Museum of American History, 1989. The original flag that was illuminated by these very 10" mortar shells.

Sir Alexander Cochrane was born into a Scottish aristocratic family as a younger son, and like many in this position made a career out of military service. Cochrane joined the Royal Navy as a boy and fought in the American Revolution. Following this war he rose quickly in the Napoleonic Wars, earning renown in the Battle of San Domingo and the Conquest of Martinique in 1809.

By the beginning of the War of 1812, Cochrane was a well-seasoned and high-ranking officer. As a vice admiral, he was appointed Commander-in-Chief of the new North American naval station in Bermuda. He devised a clever plan to weaken the American defenses and turn America’s slaves against the country by inviting any American – slave or free – to join the British Navy. Many slaves took this offer, escaping to British lines for military service in exchange for their freedom.

By the summer of 1814, Cochrane had returned to the waters of the United States, overseeing the raids of the Chesapeake. Lieutenant General Sir George Prevost, governor of Upper Canada, suggested launching an invasion somewhere in the United States in retaliation against the sack of York and to weaken the American forces, relieving pressure on Canada. Cochrane landed the ground troops to invade Washington, and presided over the bombardment of Fort McHenry in the Battle of Baltimore.

After only moderate success in the Chesapeake, Cochrane wanted to push toward New Orleans in order to cement the British position in the United States. He orchestrated an amphibious attack on the city via Lake Borgne, an inlet of the Gulf of Mexico that could bring troops close to the city.

Although Cochrane was successful in the Battle of Lake Borgne, allowing the British Army to advance toward New Orleans, the disastrous defeat at the Battle of New Orleans damaged his reputation. The influential Napoleonic War hero the Duke of Wellington in particular blamed Cochrane of the death of his brother-in-law, Sir Edward Michael Pakenham, the British general overseeing land troops at the Battle of New Orleans.

However, despite the criticisms and ultimate failure to get a foothold in the United States, Cochrane was promoted to admiral after the war, and served out the rest of his military career as Commander-in-Chief of the naval base in Plymouth, England.

The fictional nautical adventures of Captain Horatio Hornblower were supposedly based on Cochrane’s notable maritime achievements

The mortar is empty, inert and completely safe. Seated on an old iron ring for the photograph, not included with the mortar  read more

Code: 25058

1650.00 GBP

A Superb, Tibetan Shamen's Phurba or Kila, The Demon Killer Dagger. Potentially A Truly Unique Gift Idea For Christmas, a Fabulous Addition, or Indeed Start, of An Amazing Collection of Esoteric, Rare Artifacts. In Brass and Terrestrial or ‘Sky’ Iron

A Superb, Tibetan Shamen's Phurba or Kila, The Demon Killer Dagger. Potentially A Truly Unique Gift Idea For Christmas, a Fabulous Addition, or Indeed Start, of An Amazing Collection of Esoteric, Rare Artifacts. In Brass and Terrestrial or ‘Sky’ Iron

The magical demon killing dagger of Tibet. The magic of this Magical Dagger apparently comes from the effect that the material object has on the realm of the spirit. A most special artefact of once most rare interest. Just only around 150 years ago, original items of Tibetan Buddhist shamanism were all but unknown, to all of the greater public of Western civilisations, due to Tibet being a near closed society. But now, more is becoming universally known, and thus it is creating incredible interest to this amazing, unique, kind and generous peoples of the Himalayas.

The art of tantric magicians, shamens or lamas lies in their visionary ability to comprehend the spiritual energy of the material object and to willfully focus it in a determined direction. . . The tantric use of the phurba encompasses the curing of disease, exorcism, killing demons, meditation, consecrations (puja), and weather-making. The blade of the phurba is used for the destruction of demonic powers. The top end of the phurba is used by the tantrikas for blessings. With the three faces of Vajrakila in brass, steel midsection of a vajra brass face of followed by an iron three sided pointed blade. The fabrication of kila or Phurba is quite diverse. Having pommel, handle, and blade, kila are often segmented into suites of triunes on both the horizontal and vertical axes, though there are notable exceptions. This compositional arrangement highlights the numerological importance and spiritual energy of the integers three and nine.

Kila may be constituted and constructed of different materials and material components, such as wood, metal, clay, bone, gems, horn or crystal.

Like the majority of traditional Tibetan metal instruments, the kila is often made from brass and iron terrestrial and/or meteoric iron. 'Thokcha' means "sky-iron" in Tibetan and denote tektites and meteorites which are often high in iron content. Meteoric iron was highly prized throughout the Himalaya where it was included in sophisticated polymetallic alloys such as Panchaloha for ritual implements. The pommel of the kila often bears three faces of Vajrakila, one joyful, one peaceful, one wrathful, but may bear the umbrella of the ashtamangala or mushroom cap, ishtadevata (like Hayagriva), snow lion, or stupa, among other possibilities. The handle is often of a vajra, weaving or knotwork design. The handle generally has a triune form as is common to the pommel and blade. The blade is usually composed of three triangular facets or faces, meeting at the tip. These represent, respectively, the blade's power to transform the negative energies known as the "three poisons" or "root poisons" of attachment/craving/desire, delusion/ignorance/misconception, and aversion/fear/hate.

As a tool of exorcism, the kila may be employed to hold demons or thoughtforms in place (once they have been expelled from their human hosts, for example) in order that their mindstream may be re-directed and their inherent obscurations transmuted. More esoterically, the k?la may serve to bind and pin down negative energies or obscurations from the mindstream of an entity, person or thoughtform, including the thoughtform generated by a group, project and so on, to administer purification.

The kila as an iconographical implement is also directly related to Vajrakilaya, a wrathful deity of Tibetan Buddhism who is often seen with his consort Diptacakra. He is embodied in the kila as a means of destroying (in the sense of finalising and then freeing) violence, hatred, and aggression by tying them to the blade of the kila and then transmuting them with its tip. The pommel may be employed in blessings. It is therefore that the kila is not a physical weapon, but a spiritual implement, and should be regarded as such. The kila often bears the epithet Diamantine Dagger of Emptines. As Beer (1999: p. 277-278) states, transfixing kila , charnel ground, scorpion and Padmasambhava:

The sting of the scorpion's whip-like tail transfixes and poisons its prey, and in this respect it is identified with the wrathful activity of the ritual dagger or kila. Padmasambhava's biography relates how he received the siddhi of the k?la transmission at the great charnel ground of Rajgriha from a gigantic scorpion with nine heads, eighteen pincers and twenty-seven eyes. This scorpion reveals the k?la texts from a triangular stone box hidden beneath a rock in the cemetery. As Padmasambhava reads this terma text spontaneous understanding arises, and the heads, pincers, and eyes of the scorpion are 'revealed' as different vehicles or yanas of spiritual attainment. Here, at Rajgriha, Padmasambhava is given the title of 'the scorpion guru', and in one of his eight forms as Guru Dragpo or Pema Drago ('wrathful lotus'), he is depicted with a scorpion in his left hand. As an emblem of the wrathful kila transmission the image of the scorpion took on a strong symbolic meaning in the early development of the Nyingma or 'ancient school' of Tibetan Buddhism”

For reference; To see a similar example on display in the Met.

Ritual Dagger (Phurba) and Stand
Tibet
late 14th–early 15th century
On view at The Met Fifth Avenue in Gallery 253

Ritual utensils are the essential tools of Tibetan Vajrayana Buddhism practice, used to drive away the delusions that act as impediments to enlightenment. The phurba (Sanskrit: kila) dagger seen here was designed to symbolically consume the triple poisons of ignorance, greed, and delusion that impede spiritual progress. The phurba is the embodiment of the Vajrakila Buddha, who is empowered to suppress all evil in the world. Its ritual use is first described in the Vajrakilaya Tantra, a Vajrayana text dating to the eighth century or earlier.
https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/75826  read more

Code: 22515

1295.00 GBP