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A Good British Royal Artillery Sword in FS Scabbard, WW1 King George Vth Cypher

With fully etched blade.Nice bright finish, nickel three bar hilt and wire bound sharkskin grip. Fully etched blade with King George Vth cypher and wings and lightning flashes of the Royal Artillery. Overall suitable for current service use. On 1 July 1899, the Royal Artillery was divided into three groups: the Royal Horse Artillery of 21 batteries and the Royal Field Artillery of 95 batteries comprised one group, while the coastal defence, mountain, siege and heavy batteries were split off into another group named the Royal Garrison Artillery of 91 companies. The third group continued to be titled simply Royal Artillery, and was responsible for ammunition storage and supply. Which branch a gunner belonged to was indicated by metal shoulder titles (R.A., R.F.A., R.H.A., or R.G.A.). The RFA and RHA also dressed as mounted men, whereas the RGA dressed like foot soldiers. In 1920 the rank of Bombardier was instituted in the Royal Artillery. The three sections effectively functioned as separate corps. This arrangement lasted until 1924, when the three amalgamated once more to became one regiment. In 1938, RA Brigades were renamed Regiments. During the Second World War there were over 1 million men serving in 960 gunner regiments. In 1947 the Riding House Troop RHA was renamed The King's Troop RHA and, in 1951, the title of the regiment's colonel-in-chief became Captain General. When The Queen first visited the Troop after her accession, it was expected that it would become "The Queen's Troop", but Her Majesty announced that in honour of her father's decision it would remain "The King's Troop".

The Royal Horse Artillery, which has always had separate traditions, uniforms and insignia, still retains a separate identity within the regiment.

Before the Second World War, Royal Artillery recruits were required to be at least 5 feet 4 inches (1.63 m) tall. Men in mechanised units had to be at least 5 feet 8 inches (1.73 m) tall. They initially enlisted for six years with the colours and a further six years with the reserve or four years and eight years. They trained at the Royal Artillery Depot in Woolwich. The blade has feint traces of surface pitting

Code: 23607

625.00 GBP


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German Cavalry Nickel P-Hilted Sabre WW2.

Generally it was known as the cavalry sabre due to it's regular cavalry pattern form and used by the German cavalry regiments on horseback in WW2. Each German infantry division employed thousands of horses and thousands of men taking care of them. Despite losses of horses to enemy action, exposure and disease, Germany maintained a steady supply of work and saddle horses until 1945. Cavalry in the Army and the SS gradually increased in size, peaking at six cavalry divisions in February 1945. Made by Herder Solingen. There are numerous surviving original photographs of SS officer's wearing the very same pattern of sword. A photo in the gallery taken in 1936 of a large company group of 3rd SS 'Germania' officers and other ranks.

Code: 20140

575.00 GBP


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A Most Attractive and Fine Quality German Weimar Period Officer's Sword

From the 1920's to 30's. Fine lion's head pommel, with ruby glass eyes and much of the original gilt is remaining. Traditional stand of arms langet and fancy scroll work and oakleaves to the knuckle bow. Very fine blade in superb condition. Black steel scabbard. A national assembly was convened in Weimar, where a new constitution for the Deutsches Reich was written and adopted on 11 August 1919. In its fourteen years, the Weimar Republic faced numerous problems, including hyperinflation, political extremism (with paramilitaries ? both left- and right-wing) as well as contentious relationships with the victors of the First World War. The people of Germany blamed the Weimar Republic rather than their wartime leaders for the country's defeat and for the humiliating terms of the Treaty of Versailles. Weimar Germany fulfilled most of the requirements of the Treaty of Versailles although it never completely met its disarmament requirements and eventually paid only a small portion of the war reparations (by twice restructuring its debt through the Dawes Plan and the Young Plan). Under the Locarno Treaties, Germany accepted the western borders of the republic, but continued to dispute the eastern borders.

From 1930 onwards President Hindenburg used emergency powers to back Chancellors Heinrich Bruning, Franz von Papen and General Kurt von Schleicher. The Great Depression, exacerbated by Bruning's policy of deflation, led to a surge in unemployment. In 1933, Hindenburg appointed Adolf Hitler as Chancellor with the Nazi Party being part of a coalition government. The Nazis held two out of the remaining ten cabinet seats. Von Papen as Vice Chancellor was intended to be the "eminence grise" who would keep Hitler under control, using his close personal connection to Hindenburg. Within months, the Reichstag Fire Decree and the Enabling Act of 1933 had brought about a state of emergency: it wiped out constitutional governance and civil liberties. Hitler's seizure of power was permissive of government by decree without legislative participation. These events brought the republic to an end?as democracy collapsed, the founding of a single-party state began the Nazi era.

Code: 21536

525.00 GBP


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Amazing Lifetime Collection of 296 Original WW1 & WW2 Campaign Medals, Including Numerous Territorial Medals, Two Mons Stars, Two Long Service Good Conduct Medals,and A Boer War Medal

Only just priced today!. This Is a truly amazing collection, and could yield incredible results for a collector who either just wants to research the medals that can be researched, re-create the groups and sets from them, or even for a militaria dealer who wants to open up the market opportunity by acquiring 296 medals, plus 24 miniature medals, and 30 original, mostly named, recipients boxes, in one fell swoop, saving years of work trying to buy them individually. We are pricing them for likely a third of their eventual price. They could even achieve a great amount more over time, by selling individually, PLUS! with this weeks current 20% discount they represent an even further massive saving, the price [including discount for this week] is barely £14 each, and for some medal groups, that could be worth comfortably over £100 for a pair or trio, it becomes, a fabulous long term collection opportunity. They were bought by the collector in the 1950's and 60's. For example one boxed set is for a WW2 RAF Squadron Leader, with research these alone could be worth hundreds of pounds. There are groups, trios, pairs and singles. WW1 regimental medals, good and rare regiments, [all named as usual], WW2 medals, and most campaign stars, such as 1939-45, France and Germany, Italy, Africa, Pacific, Burma [unnamed as usual] unless boxed, plus numerous territorial medals [most named]. Most of the boxed medals have never been mounted or worn, all in their original boxes, all are groups of up to 6 medals. The collection contained hundreds, of all original issue medals, 99% British, all in stored and uncleaned condition, from the Boer War up to the 1950's. Numerous original miniature groups. A campaign medal is a military decoration which is awarded to a member of the military who serves in a designated military operation or performs duty in a geographical theatre. Campaign medals are very similar to service medals but carry a higher status as the award usually involves deployment to a foreign region or service in a combat zone. Campaign medals were first invented to recognize general military service in war, in contrast to meritorious decorations which were only issued on a small scale for acts of heroism and bravery. The first widespread use of campaign medals dates to the era of the Napoleonic Wars when Napoleon Bonaparte ordered a large number of ribbons and medals for issue to the soldiers serving under his command. We have just listed just some of the named/regimental medals. But we simply don’t have the time to dedicate to it ourselves. Some we have listed so far; PR WW1 PVT C F FARDELL ASC + DOG TAGS AND V.SMALL HORSE SHOE

PR WW1 VICTORY AND STAR SGT W J MARTYN 3RD KINGS OWN HUSSARS/LABOUR CORPS


PR WW1 LS SCARFIELD STO,1 RN

PR WW1 PVT H.PEARSON ASC

TRIO WW1 14/15 SPR H.J.VINEY RE

PR WW1 PVT H.HOLMWOOD + WW2 DEFENCE MEDAL [DADS ARMY] ROYAL SUSSEX

PR WW1 PVT J.W.COSTELLO NOTTS & DERBY

PR WW1 DVR J.BIGGS ASC

PR WW1 PVT C.D. CHESSELL THE QUEENS R

PR WW1 DVR G.FIXTER ASC

PR WW1 PVT R NORTHCOT ROYAL SUSSEX

WW1 VICTORY AND SCHOOL MEDAL PVT BRETT DCLI

WW1 DVR S.APPS RA

ER II PR, CAMPAIGN MEDAL MALAY PENINSULAR BAR + LSGC A/ CORPORAL, R.H.ROSE RAF

WW1 PR PVT H.J.RICHARDSON, 13 LONDON R.

WW1 PAIR PVT C.PELHAN, RW KENT R

WW1 TRIO DVR S.FIELD, RFA

WW1 TRIO PVT F.MAY, MIDDLESEX R [VICTORY RING BROKEN]

WW1 PR PVT R.W PERCIVAL COLDSTREAM GUARDS

WW1 PR DVR A EARL, RA

WW1 PR J.H.HEATH, GUNNER RA

MERCANTILE MARINE MEDAL BARON.H.ROSE MONS STAR AUG NOV 1914 PVT. H FINN ASC

Efficiency Territorial Medals,
W.O.CL.2, J.D.COCHRANE, R.A.
BDR., L.V. JOHNSON, R.A
CFN., P.W.HUNTER, R.E.M.E
PVT, R.C.FINNIS.CHESHIRE R
SJT, A.T.EARWICKER, R.A.
CPL,E.K.YATES. R.A.P.C

Q.S.A. PVT, J.LOGAN RIFLE BRIGADE

The buyer must be prepared to buy by appointment, and to visit and inspect them properly in person.

Code: 22545

5500.00 GBP


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A Good British,Edward VIIth, Ox and Bucks Light Infantry Rifles Officer's Sword in FS Scabbard,

Deluxe grade fully etched blade. Used by an officer who served in the Ox and Bucks Light Infantry. It was the Ox and Bucks that went in the Gliders to capture Pegasus Bridge on D-Day. This sword all steel hilt with traditional pierced basket with the Light Infantry Bugle. FS scabbard and steel blade with full etching. Overall light surface wear and very light remains of pitting. The Bucks Battalion of the regiment, when formed in 1908, was not allotted a number. As part of the 48th (South Midland) Division, the 1/1st Bucks Battalion fought on the Somme and at Ypres. In 1917 it moved to the Italian Front where it saw action at the Piave River and Vittorio Veneto. The 2/1st Battalion, which was formed in August 1914, also served on the Western Front, being disbanded at Germaine in February 1918. A third line unit was formed which joined the 3/4th Battalion as the 4th (Reserve) Battalion.

In 1939 the Bucks Battalion was divided as 1st and 2nd. The 1st suffered heavy casualties while serving with the BEF in France but in 1944 was able to play an important part in the Normandy assault landings. The 2nd Battalion, Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry (the 52nd) became an airborne battalion in 1941. Initially in 1st Airborne Division and then in 6th Airborne Division. The battalion provided the very first troops to land in Normandy in the D Day invasion of 1944. Their task was to secure vital bridges, some six miles inland, and to hold them until relieved by the sea borne invasion force.
Normandy

Shortly after midnight on the morning of 6th June 1944, a force of six Horsa gliders carrying 139 men of 2 Oxf & Bucks, together with 30 Royal Engineers, all under the command of Major R.J.Howard, landed in darkness to capture the bridges over the Caen Canal (Pegasus Bridge) and the River Orne (Horsa Bridge) by surprise coup de main raid.The attack on Pegasus Bridge was entirely successful and the bridge was held against fierce counter attacks until the Oxf & Bucks, joined by 7 Para, were relieved by sea borne troops.

Of the three gliders assigned to Horsa Bridge, two landed at the correct place and the Oxf & Bucks captured and held that bridge. The third glider was released at the wrong place and landed at the wrong bridge, a bridge over the River Dives about seven miles away. Nevertheless the Oxf & Bucks captured that bridge and then made their way to Ranville, through German lines, where they rejoined their batallion. Major John Howard was awarded the DSO for his skill and leadership in this action.

By the end of D+2, 6th Airborne Division was fully established on the East bank of the River Orne and held this vital sector for several months against repeated enemy attacks. The Oxf & Bucks played a major role in the major defensive battles at Escoville and Herouvillette from 7th to 14th June 1944, and then on the Breville Ridge for two months. After advancing to the River Seine in August, the battalion was withdrawn to England on 1st September 1944 to re-form.
Ardennes (The Battle of the Bulge)

The 2nd Oxf & Bucks were rushed back to Belgium to help counter the massive German breakthrough, which was intended to drive a wedge through to Antwerp, between the British and American armies. After extremely hard fighting in very cold weather, the German advance was turned into disaster when the British and American troops closed the neck of the bulge.
The Rhine Crossing

On 24th March 1945, 2 Oxf & Bucks took part in their second airborne operation, the Crossing of the Rhine. Although suffering over 400 casualties in the air and on landing. The battalion captured all of its objectives.

The bridge at Hamminkeln was taken by a platoon of the Oxf & Bucks by bayonet charge lead by Lieut Hugh Clark who was awarded an MC for this action. Determined counter attacks by German infantry and tanks were held off by 6 pdr anti tank guns of the Oxf & Bucks lead by Lieut David Rice, but with limited success. The 6 pdr shot simply bounced off the German Tiger tanks, but they were held off long enough for Royal Air Force Typhoon aircraft to be called up to finish them off.

The battalion then took a leading part in the 300 mile advance across Germany to meet the Russians near Wismar on the Baltic in May 1945. Most of the advance was on foot and it included an opposed assault crossing of the River Weser. The battalion was selected to provide the guard of honour for the meeting of Field Marshal Montgomery, with his Russian counterpart, Marshal Rokossovsky on 7th May 1945 at Wismar.
Conclusion

Few regiments of the British Army fought longer and harder than the 2 Oxf & Bucks in the great campaign from Normandy to the Baltic. "A Regiment never surpassed in arms since arms were first borne by man". (Sir William Napier 1820).

After several re-organisations of the British Army, the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry is incorporated in the Royal Green Jackets, which Regiment proudly continues the traditions and the spirit of its predecessor Regiments.This is certainly not a pristine sword, but what it lacks in condition it makes up for at least five fold with historical importance, as it was a regimental sword for one the most significant regiments involved in D-Day, and many of the more significant combat events that culminated in the German surrender.

Code: 23606

745.00 GBP


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A Good German WW2 K98 Bayonet, With Bakelite Grip

Maker stamped and waffenampt marked, dated blade 1941 and scabbard 1942. The Karabiner 98 kurz (German; "carbine 98 short", often abbreviated Kar98k or K98k and often incorrectly referred to as a "K98" (which was a Polish Carbine), is a bolt-action rifle chambered for the 7.92 ×57mm Mauser cartridge that was adopted on 21 June 1935 as the standard service rifle by the German Wehrmacht. It was one of the final developments in the long line of Mauser military rifles. Although supplemented by semi- and fully automatic rifles during World War II, it remained the primary German service rifle until the end of the war in 1945.

Code: 23603

165.00 GBP


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A Very Good 1938 British Tommy Helmet, WW2 BEF Period and Issue

This is a very good, original,British Army WW2, steel 'Tommy' Combat helmet. This helmet has all of its original rough texture dark green finish & has no dents.There are no visible manufacturer codes but they may be present under the paint . The chin strap bales are both date stamped '1938' It has its original oil cloth sweat band liner & webbing and elastic chinstrap Used from the very earliest war period, through the Battle of France the Dunkirk evacuation, and right through the entire war. The Brodie helmet is a steel combat helmet designed and patented in London in 1915 by John Leopold Brodie. A modified form of it became the Helmet, Steel, Mark I in Britain and the M1917 Helmet in the U.S. Colloquially, it was called the shrapnel helmet, battle bowler, Tommy helmet, tin hat, and in the United States the doughboy helmet. It was also known as the dishpan hat, tin pan hat, washbasin, battle bowler (when worn by officers), and Kelly helmet. The German Army called it the Salatschüssel (salad bowl). The term Brodie is often misused. It is correctly applied only to the original 1915 Brodie's Steel Helmet, War Office Pattern. From 1936, the Mark I Brodie helmet was fitted with an improved liner and an elasticated (actually, sprung) webbing chin strap. This final variant served until late 1940, when it was superseded by the slightly modified Mk II, which served the British and Commonwealth forces throughout World War II.

Code: 23590

Reserved


A WW2 German Druck Zunder 35 Fuse

Stamped “dkt 4”. This fuse was used on a variety of German mines including Anti Personnel, Behelfs Brettstckmine, Aluminium AT mines, Haft Hohlladung 3, and several improvised mines and demolition charges, also used as the main igniter in the heavy antitank mine M35610/99. Good condition. This is inert legal and safe to own in the UK. Not suitable for export

Code: 23589

90.00 GBP


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A Good WW1 Imperial German Iron Cross, Makers Hallmark Silver Mount

Souvenir from a WW2 veteran. Taken from a veteran German soldier, by a British soldier after landing on Sword Beach at the Normany landings in 1944 in the 1st Btn. Suffolk Regt. fighting continually right through to the end of the war near Bremen. A very good medal with silver rim and iron centre. Mounting ring bears maker hallmark. Next to the Victoria Cross, it is the most famous medal in the world. The Iron Cross was awarded for bravery in battle as well as other conspicuous military contributions in a battlefield environment. The Iron Cross 2nd Class was worn in one of two different methods: When in formal dress, the entire cross was worn mounted alone or as part of a medal bar. For everyday wear, only a ribbon was worn from the second hole in the tunic button.
The Iron Cross is a black four-pointed cross with white trim, with the arms widening toward the ends, similar to a cross pattée. It was designed by the neoclassical architect Karl Friedrich Schinkel and reflects the cross borne by the Teutonic Knights in the 14th century.

The ribbon for the 1813, 1870 and 1914 Iron Cross (2nd Class) was black with two thin white bands, the colours of Prussia. The non-combatant version of this award had the same medal, but the black and white colours on the ribbon were reversed.

Initially the Iron Cross was worn with the blank side out. This did not change until 1838 when the sprig facing could be presented.

Since the Iron Cross was issued over several different periods of German history, it was annotated with the year indicating the era in which it was issued. For example, an Iron Cross from the First World War bears the year "1914", while the same decoration from the Second World War is annotated "1939". The reverse of the 1870, 1914 and 1939 series of Iron Crosses have the year "1813" appearing on the lower arm, symbolizing the year the award was created. The 1813 decoration also has the initials "FW" for King Frederick William III, while the next two have a "W" for the respective kaisers, Wilhelm I and Wilhelm II. The final version shows a swastika.

It was also possible for a holder of the 1914 Iron Cross to be awarded a second or higher grade of the 1939 Iron Cross. In such cases, a "1939 Clasp" (Spange) would be worn on the original 1914 Iron Cross. (A similar award was made in 1914 but was quite rare, since there were few in service who held the 1870 Iron Cross.) For the First Class award the Spange appears as an eagle with the date "1939" that was pinned above the Cross. Although two separate awards, in some cases the holders soldered them together.

A cross was the symbol of the Teutonic Knights (a heraldic cross pattée), and the cross design (but not the specific decoration) has been the symbol of Germany's armed forces (now the Bundeswehr) since 1871. As with all our items, each one comes with our unique, lifetime guarantee, certificate of authenticity

Code: 23588

195.00 GBP


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An Officer's Cap Badge of the Northamptonshire Regt. WW2

In silver metal and gilt. With battle honour scrolls of Gibralter and Talavera. Silver coloured metal, not hallmarked English silver.

Code: 10897

95.00 GBP


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