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A Very Fine Pair of Cased WW1 Great War Imperial German Epaulettes

For the Imperial German 40th Infantry officer. Used by the German regimental officers that fought in the trenches with Adolf Hitler's infantry, and apparently the 40th relieved Hitler's company within the List Regiment, the Bavarian Reserve Infantry Regiment 16 (1st Company of the List Regiment). In their original storage case in mint condition overall. Mid blue cloth background with gilt crescent and Infantry number 40. Red back cloth. During the war, Hitler served in France and Belgium in the Bavarian Reserve Infantry Regiment 16 (1st Company of the List Regiment). He was an infantryman in the 1st Company during the First Battle of Ypres (October 1914), which Germans remember as the Kindermord bei Ypern (Ypres Massacre of the Innocents) because approximately 40,000 men (between a third and a half) of nine newly-enlisted infantry divisions became casualties in 20 days. Hitler's regiment entered the battle with 3,600 men and at its end mustered 611. By December Hitler's own company of 250 was reduced to 42. Biographer John Keegan claims that this experience drove Hitler to become aloof and withdrawn for the remaining years of war. After the battle, Hitler was promoted from Sch?tze (Private) to Gefreiter (Lance Corporal). He was assigned to be a regimental message-runner The List Regiment fought in many battles, including the First Battle of Ypres (1914), the Battle of the Somme (1916), the Battle of Arras (1917), and the Battle of Passchendaele (1917). During the Battle of Fromelles on 19?20 July 1916 the Australians, mounting their first attack in France, assaulted the Bavarian positions. The Bavarians repulsed the attackers, suffering the second-highest losses they had on any day on the Western Front, about 7,000 men

Code: 22240

375.00 GBP


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An Original King George VIth Fire Service Recruitment Poster By Fosh and Cross

In the first.22 nights of air raids, from Sept 1940, firefighters fought nearly 10,000 fires.

Bombings often occurring while the River Thames was at low tide meaning access to water was made even more difficult. Vehicles became vital in transporting water around the city. Steel frames were fitted to lorries to enable them to carry up to 1,000 gallons of water. Meanwhile, to reduce the workload of the fire service, small fires were dealt with by 'street fire parties' – civilians who were given and taught to use stirrup pumps.

The public's opinion of the fire service changed significantly as a result of the Blitz. During the 'phoney war', firefighters had been thought of as 'army dodgers'. But, in 1940 this attitude changed – our firefighters became known as 'the heroes with grimy faces'. Two days into the Blitz - Churchill told the House of Commons that Adolf Hitler 'hopes by killing large numbers of civilians, that he will terrorise and cow the people of this mighty imperial city... Little does he know the spirit of the British people.'

The Auxiliary Fire Service
As the political climate intensified in Europe during the late 1930s, an Act of Parliament was passed to authorise the formation of a voluntary fire service. The Auxiliary Fire Service (AFS) formed in January 1938 and fire stations were set up in schools, garages and factories.

A recruitment drive was launched, with over 28,000 firefighters needed to support the Brigade's 2,500 officers and firefighters. However, as most young men had joined the army, the AFS welcomed those too old or too young to go to war. It also marked the first time women joined the Brigade.

Did women fight fires in WWII?
Though women did train, they didn't actually fight fires in the Second World War. They became fire watchers and drivers, and managed the communications networks. A rank system for women of the fire service was developed during the war to recognise their service and bravery – many were awarded for their remarkable achievements.

By 1943 over
70,000 women
had enrolled in the NFS in the United Kingdom. When peace was declared, London's fire service had attended over 50,000 calls though tragically, 327 of London's firefighters lost their lives. It's a sacrifice we'll never forget.

We never normally comment on the investment potential of any collectable, but the potential for all underpriced WW1, WW2 etc. posters may be incredible, for example the more famed original poster, 'Keep Calm and Carry On' can now sell for over £20,000.
Good condition 15 inches x 19.75 inches

Code: 23847

295.00 GBP


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A Superb, Large, Soviet Russian Cold War Period Issue Propaganda Poster

Showing photos of famous figures and events in the Russian revolutionary communist party. Vintage or antique Russian posters, in fact all forms of posters, are now becoming extraordinarily collectable. Their original purpose of being entirely transitory and disposable means so few original examples now exist, and can now only be usually seen in museum archive displays. Another poster for the Battleship Potemkin Russian movie, designed by the Stenberg brothers in 1925, sold in November 2012 for 103,250 Pounds Sterling at Christies Auction in London. It arranged class elements into a powerful design of revolutionary upheaval. As with any art form the value of a poster is somewhat dependent on the artist who created it. For example, the Frenchman, Chenet’s work is very sought after, however other artists' work can be even more desirable. Henri deToulouse-Lautrec is well known for his images of the Parisian night-life. His posters are filled with images of showgirls, bright colours, and stylized fonts. The auction record for an art poster is held by his Moulin Rouge, which sold for an amazing $241,500.00 in 1999. Slight staining, creases and small tears mostly bottom left, mounting circular holes to the top section. 57 cm x 86cm.

Code: 23849

155.00 GBP


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A Fabulous & V.Rare 1929 Original Movie Poster. of "The Lost Zeppelin""The Hollywood Production Swedish Poster, In Original Swedish

In superb condition, a stunning example of fabulous, original, 1920's Art Deco Hollywood artistry. The Lost Zeppelin [Den Forsvunna Zeppelinaren] Tiffany-Stahl Productions (Los Angeles) This early 1920s original poster represents, potentially, incredibly good value. For example an original 1933 poster for King Kong can today command a price in excess of £70,000

This film, like Capra's Dirigible, is also loosely based on the crash of the airship Italia, flown by Umberto Nobile, around May 25, 1928 near the North Pole, and the international rescue effort that cost early polar explorer Roald Amundson his life. The pilot who rescued Nobile also crashed when returning to rescue more survivors and had to be rescued himself. Starring; Conway Tearle as Commander Donald Hall
Virginia Valli as Miriam Hall
Ricardo Cortez as Tom Armstrong
Duke Martin as Lieutenant Wallace
Kathryn McGuire as Nancy
Winter Hall as Mr. Wilson
Richard Cramer as Radio Announcer (voice)
Ervin Nyiregyhazi as Pianist (uncredited)
William H. O'Brien as Radio Operator (uncredited).
We never normally comment on the investment potential of any collectable, but the potential for all underpriced WW1 and WW2 posters must be incredible, for example the more famed poster, 'Keep Calm and Carry On' can now sell for over £20,000.
Poster sold unframed. [Reflections are due to temporary frame] 29 x 42 inches

Code: 17110

845.00 GBP


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Mightier Yet! A Superb and Original, Large, British WW2 Propaganda Poster For the Royal Navy

A rare and amazing artefact of WW2. Printed for H.M Stationary Office by Fosh & Cross Ltd. A propaganda information and recruitment poster. Britain re-created the World War I Ministry of Information for the duration of World War II to generate propaganda to influence the population towards support for the war effort. A wide range of media was employed aimed at local and overseas audiences. Traditional forms such as newspapers and posters were joined by new media including cinema (film), newsreels and radio. A wide range of themes were addressed, fostering hostility to the enemy, support for allies, and specific pro war projects such as conserving metal and growing vegetables. In 1940 in particular, Winston Churchill made many calls for the British to fight on, and for British units to fight until they died rather than submit. His calls for fight to victory inspired a hardening of public opinion. Determination raised the numbers of the Home Guard and inspired a willingness to fight to the last ditch, in a manner rather similar to Japanese determination, and the slogan "You can always take one with you" was used in the grimmest times of the war. British victories were announced to the public for morale purposes, and broadcast to Germany for purposes of undermining morale.

Even during Dunkirk, an optimistic spin was put on how the soldiers were eager to return.

When the U-boat commander Gunther Prien vanished with his submarine U-47, Churchill personally informed the House of Commons, and radio broadcasts to Germany asked, "Where is Prien?" until Germany was forced to acknowledge his loss.

The turn of the war made BBC's war commentaries much more stirring.

We never normally comment on the investment potential of any collectable, but the potential for all underpriced WW1 and WW2 posters must be incredible, for example the more famed poster, 'Keep Calm and Carry On' can now sell for over £20,000.
Good condition with central folding creases. 20 inches x 30 inches.

Code: 20768

795.00 GBP


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Mightier Yet! Every Day More Planes Every Day More Pilots Original WW2

Propaganda poster for the British wartime RAF and the mighty Hurricane. Printed for HM Stationary Office by J. Weiner Ltd London WC1. A propaganda information and recruitment poster. The size as were used in the underground trains advertising panels, or the back of black cabs. Britain re-created the World War I Ministry of Information for the duration of World War II to generate propaganda to influence the population towards support for the war effort. A wide range of media was employed aimed at local and overseas audiences. Traditional forms such as newspapers and posters were joined by new media including cinema (film), newsreels and radio. A wide range of themes were addressed, fostering hostility to the enemy, support for allies, and specific pro war projects such as conserving metal and growing vegetables. In 1940 in particular, Winston Churchill made many calls for the British to fight on, and for British units to fight until they died rather than submit. His calls for fight to victory inspired a hardening of public opinion. Determination raised the numbers of the Home Guard and inspired a willingness to fight to the last ditch, in a manner rather similar to Japanese determination, and the slogan "You can always take one with you" was used in the grimmest times of the war. British victories were announced to the public for morale purposes, and broadcast to Germany for purposes of undermining morale.

Even during Dunkirk, an optimistic spin was put on how the soldiers were eager to return.

When the U-boat commander Gunther Prien vanished with his submarine U-47, Churchill personally informed the House of Commons, and radio broadcasts to Germany asked, "Where is Prien?" until Germany was forced to acknowledge his loss.

The turn of the war made BBC's war commentaries much more stirring.

We never normally comment on the investment potential of any collectable, but the potential for all underpriced WW1 and WW2 posters must be incredible, for example the more famed poster, 'Keep Calm and Carry On' can now sell for over £20,000.
Good condition 10 inches x 15 inches

Code: 20863

395.00 GBP


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An Original WW2 British Special Constabulary Recruitment Poster

Published for HMG by Fosh and Cross Ltd London. A propaganda information and recruitment poster. The size as were used in the underground trains advertising panels, or the back of black cabs. Britain re-created the World War I Ministry of Information for the duration of World War II to generate propaganda to influence the population towards support for the war effort. A wide range of media was employed aimed at local and overseas audiences. Traditional forms such as newspapers and posters were joined by new media including cinema (film), newsreels and radio. A wide range of themes were addressed, fostering hostility to the enemy, support for allies, and specific pro war projects such as conserving metal and growing vegetables. In 1940 in particular, Winston Churchill made many calls for the British to fight on, and for British units to fight until they died rather than submit. His calls for fight to victory inspired a hardening of public opinion. Determination raised the numbers of the Home Guard and inspired a willingness to fight to the last ditch, in a manner rather similar to Japanese determination, and the slogan "You can always take one with you" was used in the grimmest times of the war. British victories were announced to the public for morale purposes, and broadcast to Germany for purposes of undermining morale.

Even during Dunkirk, an optimistic spin was put on how the soldiers were eager to return.

When the U-boat commander Gunther Prien vanished with his submarine U-47, Churchill personally informed the House of Commons, and radio broadcasts to Germany asked, "Where is Prien?" until Germany was forced to acknowledge his loss.

The turn of the war made BBC's war commentaries much more stirring.

We never normally comment on the investment potential of any collectable, but the potential for all underpriced WW1 and WW2 posters must be incredible, for example the more famed poster, 'Keep Calm and Carry On' can now sell for over £20,000.
Good condition 14.75 inches x 9.75 inches

Code: 20874

295.00 GBP


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Original WW2 Volunteer Recruitment Poster. 'Lend A Hand On The Land'

A very fine propaganda recruitment poster for the Land Army. Britain re-created the World War I Ministry of Information for the duration of World War II to generate propaganda to influence the population towards support for the war effort. A wide range of media was employed aimed at local and overseas audiences. Traditional forms such as newspapers and posters were joined by new media including cinema (film), newsreels and radio. A wide range of themes were addressed, fostering hostility to the enemy, support for allies, and specific pro war projects such as conserving metal and growing vegetables. In 1940 in particular, Winston Churchill made many calls for the British to fight on, and for British units to fight until they died rather than submit. His calls for fight to victory inspired a hardening of public opinion. Determination raised the numbers of the Home Guard and inspired a willingness to fight to the last ditch, in a manner rather similar to Japanese determination, and the slogan "You can always take one with you" was used in the grimmest times of the war. British victories were announced to the public for morale purposes, and broadcast to Germany for purposes of undermining morale.

Even during Dunkirk, an optimistic spin was put on how the soldiers were eager to return.

When the U-boat commander Gunther Prien vanished with his submarine U-47, Churchill personally informed the House of Commons, and radio broadcasts to Germany asked, "Where is Prien?" until Germany was forced to acknowledge his loss.
The turn of the war made BBC's war commentaries much more stirring.

We never normally comment of the investment potential of any collectable, but the potential for all underpriced WW1 and WW2 posters must be incredible, for example the more famed poster, 'Keep Calm and Carry On' can now sell for over £20,000. This poster is "14.75 x 19.5 inches

Code: 20933

395.00 GBP


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A Fine Original Chapka Plate for the 9th Royal Lancers WW1 Issue

With all battle honours up to the Boer War. The last Lancer regiment to engage in Lance on Lance combat in WW1. The chapka was a type of helmet worn by 19th century Polish light cavalry and later adopted by another nations, including Britain.
During the Second Boer War, 1899-1902, the Lancers took part in the following actions: Belmont, Battle of Modder River, Magerfonstien, Relief of Kimberley, and the following Battle of Paardeberg which resulted in Cronje?s surrender. They provided Lord Roberts? escort for his state entry into Bloemfontein. After the war, the 9th returned to Sialkot in the Punjab Although engaged in combat for the whole of the war the Lancers only operated as a cavalry unit during 1914. This was due to the widespread use of machine guns and shelling and also the advent of the tank. For the remainder of the war they operated as infantry in the trenches.

Notable events included a Victoria Cross for Captain Francis Octavius Grenfell for his actions in saving the guns of 119th Battery, Royal Field Artillery on 24 August 1914 (he was later killed in action on 24 May 1915, as was his twin brother, Riversdale, a yeomanry officer who attached to 9th Lancers), and the regiment's participation in the final "lance on lance" action of the First World War on 7 September 1914 at Moncel in which Lieutenant Colonel David Campbell led a charge of two troops of B Squadron and overthrew a squadron of the 1st Guard Dragoons. After Campbell left on promotion he was replaced as commanding officer by Desmond Beale-Browne.

.
By the end of the war 274 Lancers had died.

In August 1914 Hume's regiment was in Belgium with the British Expeditionary Force (BEF). On 24 August during the Battle of Mons, they charged a large body of German infantry who were advancing to encircle the 5th Division at Audregnies. This famous action saw Captain Francis Grenfell win the Victoria Cross. The 9th Queen's Royal Lancers, or the Delhi Spearmen, were a cavalry regiment of the British Army. They are best known for their roles in the Indian mutiny of 1857, the WW1 Charge at Mons, and for their part in the North African campaign of World War II including the retreat to and the battle of El Alamein in 1942.The 9th Queen's Royal Lancers were originally formed during the Jacobite Risings in 1715. They were formed by Major-General Owen Wynne and were the second cavalry regiment in the British Army. They were initially known as the "9th Dragoons" or "Wynne's Dragoons". In 1717, the regiment embarked for Ballinrobe, in Ireland, and was placed on the Irish establishment.

In 1783 they converted into Light Dragoons, becoming the 9th Light Dragoons, and served in the Irish Rebellion of 1798, Sir Samuel Auchmuty's expedition to the River Plate in 1803, the occupation of Montevideo and Wellington's Peninsula War between 1811 and 1813.

In 1816 they were constituted Lancers and in 1830 were given the distinguished title of "Queen's Royal", in honour of Queen Adelaide, consort of William IV, hence becoming the 9th Queen's Royal Lancers.
The Lancers were first posted to India during the Gwalior Campaign of 1843. They subsequently took part in the First Anglo-Sikh War of 1845-46 and the Second Anglo-Sikh War of 1848-49 where they were often led by Sir Hope Grant and were the first recipients of the Bronze Star Medal.

During the Indian mutiny of 1857, the 9th Lancers earned the name the Delhi Spearmen, a name which is believed to have been given to them by the mutineers themselves. 9th Lancers was present in all three of the most notable events associated with the Indian mutiny, namely, the seizure of Delhi, the seizure of Lucknow and the relief of Lucknow. For their actions the Lancers were awarded twelve Victoria Crosses, more than any other cavalry regiment. They were described by an ally as:-


"The beau ideal of all that British Cavalry ought to be in Oriental countries".

Code: 18936

395.00 GBP


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WW2 Advertising Poster for The National Gallery 'War Pictures'

Printed for H.M.Stationary Office by Hubners Ltd. On their way to the Myra Hess concerts in October 1939, visitors to the National Gallery couldn't help noticing the forlorn bare walls where the paintings had been before the war.

Art under fire

Before long, a series of temporary exhibitions was organised a rarity for museums and galleries at the time. There were also rolling displays of contemporary war art organised by the WAAC (War Artists Advisory Committee) that Kenneth Clark had helped set up at the outset of war. The temporary exhibitions spanned a large variety of subjects, ranging from Nineteenth Century French Paintings? and British Painting since Whistler to War Pictures By British Artists and Greater London: Towards a Master Plan.

These exhibitions were often disrupted by the damage inflicted by the nightly bombing raids during the Blitz. This didn't affect the large number of visitors attending. In fact there was much debate as to whether visitors should be asked to leave during the many air-raid warnings that occurred each day. By 1942 the bombing raids had lessened. It was now felt that one painting could be brought up to London from Manod every month. It was put on show in splendid isolation with some accompanying documentary material.

Every night the work was removed from display and stored in the underground strong room for safety. The arrival of each painting was a news event. The picture of the month scheme exists in the Gallery to this day.


Posters are a true form of art with a purpose as they were designed to deliver a particular message through striking designs. These original vintage posters were created to grab the attention of passers-by, presenting artists with the challenge of condensing the message or a concept into a precise, short visual and written form in a single artwork. They are important items of social history that capture the essence of the time they were printed. Original vintage posters are recognised as a sound art investment that can be enjoyed every day. 25 x 18.5 inches

Code: 20770

295.00 GBP


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