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A Good Early Naval Merchantman Ship's Cannon Priming Flask
18th to 19th century naval gunner's priming powder flask, of polished cow horn body, with traditional wooden base with brass spout plug and on of two carrying rings. In the firing naval cannon huge amounts of gunpowder were required to fire them, and the cannon were ignited with very fine quality, fine ground priming powder poured into the touch hole. Young boys, often known as ‘powder monkeys’, would haul gunpowder to the gun decks within barrels. Cow horns flasks, were used to contain the fine grain priming powder, which was poured into the pan of the touch hole of each cannon before firing. 9" long overall

Code: 22987Price: 495.00 GBP


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Victorian Royal Dublin Fusiliers Fur Cap Grenade
The Royal Dublin Fusiliers was an Irish infantry Regiment of the British Army created in 1881, one of eight Irish regiments raised and garrisoned in Ireland, with its home depot in Naas. The Regiment was created by the amalgamation of two British Army regiments in India, the Royal Bombay Fusiliers and Royal Madras Fusiliers, with Dublin and Kildare militia units as part of the Childers Reforms that created larger regiments and linked them with "Regimental Districts". Both regular battalions of the Regiment fought in the Second Boer War. In the First World War, a further six battalions were raised and the regiment saw action on the Western Front, the Mediterranean, and the Middle East. In the course of the war three Victoria Cross were awarded. The Boers declared war on 12 October and invaded Natal and the Cape Colony. On 20 October the 2nd Dublins took part in the first major battle of the war, the Battle of Talana Hill near Dundee. The Boers had appeared on Talana Hill in the early morning and after they launched a few shells at Dundee, the garrison responded and attacked the hill. The 2nd Dublins took part in the attack and, after some fierce fighting, removed the Boers. They suffered heavy casualties in the process, losing, amongst others, Captain George Anderson Weldon, the first officer of the Dublins to be killed in the war. The British had to abandon Dundee soon afterwards, withdrawing to Ladysmith. The Boers besieged the town in late October. On 30 October the garrison's commander, Sir George Stuart White VC, ordered an attack on Lombard's Kop which the Dublin Fusiliers took part in.

On 15 November 1899, a detachment of Dubliners and the Durban Light Infantry were garrisoning an armoured train operating from Estcourt with the objective of monitoring Boer movements. The Boers ambushed them on their return and a section of the train was de-railed in the chaos. Among the passengers was Winston Churchill, then a war correspondent accompanying the detachment, who helped load the train engine with wounded before it made an escape attempt, pushing through the de-railed section that blocked its path and making it through safely. The remaining troops put up a stout defence until they were eventually compelled to surrender, including Churchill who had returned to the remaining defenders. Churchill later made a successful escape attempt from his prison in Pretoria. He wrote glowingly of the gallantry displayed by the Dublin Fusiliers and the other troops that were present during the ambush. The Dublins lost three men during the ambush.

The Dublin Fusiliers actively took part in the efforts to lift the Siege of Ladysmith, which lasted from 30 October 1899 to 28 February 1900. On 15 December the 2nd Dublins took part in the Battle of Colenso. The Dublins were part of the 5th Brigade (known as the Irish Brigade) who crossed the wrong part of the Tugela River and suffered heavy casualties in the process. The battle was a defeat for the British forces and became part of a notorious period for the British in the war, known as "Black Week". The defeat, however, did not discourage further attempts being made. The Dublins did not participate in any more attempts until January 1900 when they took part in the Tugela campaign, collectively known as the Battle of the Tugela Heights. February saw the Dublins take part in heavy fighting before, on 27 February, they supported the Royal Irish Fusiliers in their final charge on Pieters Hill, suffering heavy casualties though taking the position. This victory led to the siege of Ladysmith being lifted the following day by cavalry, with the main force of infantry arriving on 3 March. On 10 March 1900 Queen Victoria decreed that a sprig of shamrock be adorned on the headdress of Irish units on Saint Patrick's Day to commemorate their actions in South Africa. This tradition remains in existence with Irish units of the British Army.

In May, the British began their advance towards the Transvaal, one of the Boer republics, and early the following month the Dublins took part in the effort against Laing's Nek during the attempt to achieve an entry into the Transvaal. This was successfully achieved and the capital, Pretoria, was captured on 5 June. The war, however, did not end and the Boers began a guerrilla campaign against the British. During this phase of the war, many blockhouses were constructed to help restrict the movement of the Boer guerrillas and men of the Dublin Fusiliers helped to garrison them. This phase of the war also saw the mounted infantry companies, among which were Dublin Fusiliers MI, in their element, hunting the (now small) groups of Boers. The Dublin Fusiliers also took part in the hunt for Christiaan de Wet, a prominent Boer officer.

Code: 22986Price: 85.00 GBP


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Rare Austro-Hungarian Model 1854/67 Wänzl Lorenz Breech-Loading Rifle
An absolute beauty, with a fabulous polished patianted stock and good tight action. Used from 1868 right throught to the end of WW1. Also, remarkably, it was used in the Boxer Rebellion in China by the Ching Dynasty Empire. This would make a superb addition to any fine collection of 19th century to WW1 use rifles. Plus, no deactivation is required as it used a now unrestricted cartridge no longer made. Wänzl rifles saw use during the Herzegovina Uprising of 1882, the Boxer Rebellion, the Balkan Wars, and as noted the Great War. The Wänzl rifle was a breechloading conversion of the M1854 & M1862 Lorenz rifle. The Austro-Hungarian Empire used the Wänzl as their service rifle until they had sufficient M1867 Werndl-Holub rifles to arm their military. The rifle was a lifting-block breechloader chambered for the 14×33mm Wänzl rimfire cartridge. The Austrians converted a total of 70,000 Lorenz muskets to Wänzls.

The Lorenz percussion rifle adopted in 1854 was conceived by Lieutenant JOSEPH LORENZ of the Austrian Army. In 1862 this rifle was revised slightly, with a different "Enfield-Style" lock plate, and more consistent manufacturing. In 1866 after losing the Austro/Prussian War having faced the superior Prussian Dreyse needle fire rifle the search started for a new revolutionary infantry weapon.

This turned out to be the 1867 WERNDL rolling block rifle personally selected by the Emperor Franz Joseph. The question remained of what to do with the vast inventory remaining of the M1854 and M1862 Lorenz rifles.

This was solved with the 1867 introduction of the WÄNZL conversion system that turned the Lorenz muzzle loader into a 14MM metallic cartridge breech loader. On June 14, 1866 the Austro-Prussian War broke out, and at the end of the seven-week conflict, the badly beaten Austrian military was convinced the era of muzzleloading military arms was over. The Prussian forces were armed with the Dreyse Needle Rifle, a breechloading bolt action rifle and the Austrian forces were still using muzzleloading M1854 and M1862 Lorenz rifles and rifle muskets that were simply no match for the Prussian firepower. As a result, the Austrian military immediately looked for a way to modernize their small arms. While an appropriate breechloading design was being developed, the Austrians did what nearly every major military power had down during the 1860s; they looked for a way to alter huge existing stocks of muzzleloading arms to breechloaders.
The system adopted by the Austrians was developed by Viennese gunmaker Franz Wänzl. His modification was similar to the American “trapdoor” system developed by Erskine S. Allin. A new breech section was machined with a hinged door that lifted up to reveal the chamber. The breech section included a cartridge extractor and included a locking system to prevent the “trapdoor” from opening when the gun was fired. A sliding bolt at the rear of the receiver was engaged by the action of the hammer, and this bolt locked the breech block closed when the hammer was in any position other than full cock. Thus, at the half-cock and fired positions, the breech block door was securely bolted in the closed position. A spring-loaded firing pin was machined through the trapdoor at an angle and allowed ignition of the 14mmx33R rimfire (and later centerfire) Wänzl cartridge. The arms retained their original 13.9mm (.547”) bores, from when they were muzzleloading arms. The cartridge adopted used a 13.9mm 458 grain projectile with a 1.3” long straight-walled rimmed case. Presumably the ballistics were similar to the original muzzleloading cartridge, as no changes to sight regulation have been noted on most of the Wänzl alterations that I have observed, although some are found with upgraded sights.
During the latter part of the 1860s some 70,000 Austrian arms were altered to the Wänzl system by Steyr, primarily M1854 and M1862 Lorenz Rifle Muskets. However, some M1854 and M1862 Jägerstutzen rifles as well some Extra-Corps carbines were also altered to the system. The Wänzl alterations were rather quickly superseded with front line troops with the M1867 Werndl Breechloading Rifle, but the Wänzl remained in use through the end of World War I! In addition to use by the Austro-Hungarian Empire, the Wänzl saw use with the Qing Dynasty during the latter part of that empire’s rule. Wänzl rifles saw use during the Herzegovina Uprising of 1882, the Boxer Rebellion, the Balkan Wars, and as noted the Great War. As with all our guns no licence is required to own, purchase or collect this rifle. It is an unrestricted antique collectable. 52.5 inches long

Code: 22985Price: 1395.00 GBP


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The Lanes Armoury The Largest Online Militaria Website in the World
GOOD NEWS, 25% ANNIVERSARY DISCOUNT STILL RUNNING*** We Are Also One of the Oldest Website Trading Companies in the UK, based at our Brighton premises. We have been Online Website Trading since 1998, and family business trading in Brighton for over 100 Years. In view of the recent government announcements around the Coronavirus (COVID-19) crisis we are now implementing our Business Continuity Plan procedures and thought we should share this with you. Meanwhile we wish all of our customers around the world our kindest regards, and to keep safe and well.

Our Website with Webshop is carrying on as usual, with all our online buying facilities continuing as normal. As you will appreciate, these are unprecedented times for all of us, and for the time being our shop is being maintained via telephone contact for orders etc on 07721 010085 or 01273 321357 our website is operating as normal and contact can also be made by normal email. Deliveries are also going ahead with our usual carriers. WE DO NOT SELL LICENSABLE ITEMS OF ANY KIND ONLY UNRESTRICTED COLLECTABLES To contact us by telephone outside of the UK call, in office hours, 00 44 1273 321357, or from North America 011 44 1273 321357. Outside of office hours call 00 44 7721 010085 or from North America 011 44 7721010085. Don't Forget, our 25% Centenary Anniversary Discount is still applicable on all sales as we are carrying it on due to the virus worldwide lock-down for our clients with only the internet for comfort. Many of our regulars are telling us that due to the current 'Confined to Barracks' situation, they are enjoying viewing our site and taking advantage of our special discount on their next purchases. PLEASE NOTE*** THE 25% DISCOUNT WILL NOT SHOW OR APPEAR ON ANY ONLINE ORDER, OR, THE CONFIRMATION E.MAIL, ONLY THE REGULAR PRE-DISCOUNTED PRICE WILL BE SHOWN, BUT, IT WILL CERTAINLY BE DISCOUNTED IMMEDIATELY WHEN IT IS CHARGED TO A CARD, SO YOU WILL NOT HAVE TO PAY THE REGULAR SHOWN PRICE.

Code: 22984Price: On Request


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An Original German WW2 1938 3rd Reich MutterKreuz Medal, Bronze, With
A good example of what is believed to be the most complicated and expensive medal made during the entire Third Reich era. It was not the largest and certainly not the most valuable but the most complex, and the only one to bear Adolf Hitler's signature. The Mutterkreuz was made involving up to 10 individual manufacturing processes. This is an interesting fact given to us around 35 years ago by a then retired German medal maker from WW2, and subsequently confirmed to us by the nephew of Wolfgang Aldegarmann of U 297 [U-boat lost at sea 16 miles off Orkney in WW2]. With ribbon. On reverse; 16th December 1938, Adolf Hitler. Issued in three grades bronze, silver and gold.

Code: 22982Price: 138.00 GBP


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1929 German Graf Zeppelin Lakehurst, Friedrichshafen, Tokio & LA
Front of the commemorative badge has Lakehurst - Friedrichshafen - Tokio (Tokyo) - Los Angeles - Lakehurst. Shows Graf Zeppelin flying over the world. Representing the round-the-world flight (1929)
The American newspaper publisher William Randolph Hearst's media empire paid half the cost of the project to fly Graf Zeppelin around the world,with four staff on the flight; Drummond-Hay, Karl von Wiegand, the Australian explorer Hubert Wilkins, and the cameraman Robert Hartmann. Drummond-Hay became the first woman to circumnavigate the world by air.

Hearst stipulated that the flight in August 1929 officially start and finish at Lakehurst. Round-the-world tickets were sold for almost $3000 (equivalent to $45,000 in 2019), but most participants had their costs paid for them. The flight's expenses were offset by the carriage of souvenir mail between Lakehurst, Friedrichshafen, Tokyo, and Los Angeles.A US franked letter flown on the whole trip from Lakehurst to Lakehurst required $3.55 (equivalent to $53 in 2019) in postage.

Graf Zeppelin refuelled at Friedrichshafen, then continued across Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union to Tokyo. After five days at a former German airship shed that had been removed from Jüterbog and rebuilt at Kasumigaura Naval Air Station,Graf Zeppelin continued across the Pacific to California. Eckener delayed crossing the coast at San Francisco's Golden Gate so as to come in near sunset for aesthetic effect.The ship landed at Mines Field in Los Angeles, completing the first ever nonstop flight across the Pacific Ocean. The takeoff from Los Angeles was difficult because of high temperatures and an inversion layer. To lighten the ship, six crew were sent on to Lakehurst by aeroplane. The airship suffered minor damage from a tail strike and barely cleared electricity cables at the edge of the field. The Graf Zeppelin arrived back at Lakehurst from the west on the morning of 29 August, three weeks after it had departed to the east.

Flying time for the four Lakehurst to Lakehurst legs was 12 days, 12 hours, and 13 minutes; the entire circumnavigation (including stops) took 21 days, 5 hours, and 31 minutes to cover 33,234 km (20,651 mi; 17,945 nmi). It was the fastest circumnavigation of the globe at the time.

Eckener became the tenth recipient and the third aviator to be awarded the Gold Medal of the National Geographic Society, which he received on 27 March 1930 at the Washington Auditorium. Before returning to Germany, Eckener met President Herbert Hoover, and successfully lobbied the US Postmaster General for a special three-stamp issue (C-13, 14 & 15) for mail to be carried on the Europe-Pan American flight due to leave Germany in mid-May. Germany issued a commemorative coin celebrating the circumnavigation.
Size: 1 3/4" diameter

Code: 22980Price: 125.00 GBP


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Original Photograph Of Roald Amundsen, Polar Flights, Taken in 1926
Photograph of the participants in the polar flights of the Norge, taken in 1926: From left to right; Riiser-Larsen, Amundsen, Ellsworth, Nobile (and the dog!). Roald Engelbregt Gravning Amundsen 16 July 1872 – c. 18 June 1928) was the world famous Norwegian explorer of the polar regions, and conqueror of the South Pole. He led the Antarctic expedition (1910-12) to become the first men to reach the South Pole in December 1911. In 1926, he was the first expedition leader to be recognized without dispute as having reached the North Pole.

He is also known as the first to traverse the Northwest Passage (1903–06). He disappeared in June 1928 while taking part in a rescue mission. Amundsen, Douglas Mawson, Robert Falcon Scott, and Ernest Shackleton were key expedition leaders during the Heroic Age of Antarctic Exploration. Aerial Expeditions to the North Pole
His 1923 attempt to fly over the Pole failed. Amundsen and Oskar Omdal, of the Royal Norwegian Navy, had tried to fly from Wainwright, Alaska, to Spitsbergen across the North Pole. When their aircraft was damaged, they abandoned the journey. To raise additional funds, Amundsen traveled around the United States in 1924 on a lecture tour. Although he was unable to reach the North Pole, the scientific results of the expedition, mainly the work of Sverdrup, have proven to be of considerable value. Much of the carefully collected scientific data was lost during the ill-fated journey of Peter Tessem and Paul Knutsen, two crew members sent on a mission by Amundsen. The scientific materials were later retrieved by Russian scientist Nikolay Urvantsev from where they had been abandoned on the shores of the Kara Sea.

In 1925, accompanied by Lincoln Ellsworth, pilot Hjalmar Riiser-Larsen, and three other team members, Amundsen took two Dornier Do J flying boats, the N-24 and N-25, to 87° 44? north. It was the northernmost latitude reached by plane up to that time. The aircraft landed a few miles apart without radio contact, yet the crews managed to reunite. The N-24 was damaged. Amundsen and his crew worked for more than three weeks to clean up an airstrip to take off from ice. They shovelled 600 tons of ice while consuming only one pound (400 g) of daily food rations. In the end, the six crew members were packed into the N-25. In a remarkable feat, Riiser-Larsen took off, and they barely became airborne over the cracking ice. They returned triumphant when everyone thought they had been lost forever.

In 1926, Amundsen and 15 other men (including Ellsworth, Riiser-Larsen, Oscar Wisting, and the Italian air crew led by aeronautical engineer Umberto Nobile) made the first crossing of the Arctic in the airship Norge, designed by Nobile. They left Spitsbergen on 11 May 1926, flew over the North Pole on 12 May, and landed in Alaska the following day.

Code: 22979Price: 145.00 GBP


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A Super Ancient Roman Augur's Sorcerer's Ring, Multiple Lituus Symbols
2nd century AD. The Ring of a highest ranking Roman sorcerer. Augustus Caeser and Tiberius Caeser both wore a ring of the symbol of a Roman Augur [sorcerer]. Part of a superb original museum grade collection we have acquired of Roman rings, also with some medieval and Norman rings as well. Augustus Caeser was indeed an auger himself, as was Mark Anthony. The engraved device and symbol of an ancient Roman Auger shows numerous Lituus, or priest's staffs. These were wands carried, as symbols of office, by ancient Roman augurs and used in carrying out the rituals for the foretelling of future events, what was later called sorcery. An augur was a highly esteemed priest and cult leader and official in the classical Roman world. His main role was the practice of augury: Interpreting the will of the gods by studying the flight of birds – whether they were flying in groups or alone, what noises they made as they flew, direction of flight, and what kind of birds they were. This was known as "taking the auspices".

The augural ceremony and function of the augur was central to any major undertaking in Roman society – public or private – including matters of war, commerce, and religion. Augurs sought the divine will regarding any proposed course of action which might affect Rome's pax, fortuna, and salus (peace, good fortune, and well-being) We show an ancient Bronze Statue of Tiberius as Pontifex Maximus-[over 8 feet high]-ca. 37 AD-discovered in Herculaneum, in the-Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Napoli. Tiberius is wearing an augur sorcerers ring, also we show a picture from a full original statue of Augustus Caeser, and he too wears his sorcerer's [augur's] ring. A heavy grade good sized bronze ring in very nice condition and fine aged patina. Octavian was also an augur. Haverfield surmises that the choice of "Augustus" as the name might also have meant to overshadow the legend "AUG" on coins issued by his defeated enemy Pompey' – where "AUG" signifies Pompey's status as an augur, defeated with the help of Augustus' superior augury. Augustus chose to be addressed differently during his rise to power and success to accrue nothing less than reverence from the Roman people. He was born Gaius Octavius from his biological father and later expanded to the name Gaius Julius Caesar Octavianus, as he was named Caesar’s son and heir by his will in 45 BC. The meaning of the name Augustus, which was bestowed upon him by the Senate on 16th January 27 BC, carried with it ideas of superhuman status, from the Latin ‘augere‘ meaning ‘to increase’, connected also with ‘augurium‘ and the religious connotations of augury, further linking Augustus into the realms of Romulus, the founder of Rome, ‘and elevated him beyond mortal limits’. In 27 BC, the Senate agreed to officially and legally recognise Julius Caesar as a god, cementing the legislative amendments he made in his time as dictator and subsequently condemning objections. In this move, Octavian ‘was now able to describe himself as divi filius – son of a god’, ignoring his adoption into the Caesar family tree, but ‘son of a new god and as such “holy” and venerable himself’. In his Res Gestae Divi Augusti, Augustus describes that laurels symbolic of his adoptive father were placed at his door that day, a shrub which also links to the god of music, Apollo, further cementing Augustus’ belief in his strong connections with the god. Appealing to his connections with Apollo, in October 28 BC, Augustus ‘dedicated a huge new Temple of Apollo on the Palatine Hill near his home’ to give thanks for the god’s assistance in his substantial victory at Actium, which is frequently described by poets as a decisive victory thanks to ‘Actian Apollo’s interventions. Augustus mentions this temple in his Res Gestae Divi Augusti, a signal of his pride in his achievements and a reminder to readers of his connection with the god. The form of this ring is in traditional Roman bronze, and it is more likely Augustus's personal ring would have been gold, unless of course, he wore his original Augur's ring, when title of Augur was bestowed upon him, when he was known as Octavian, long before he became emperor. The complete Roman Empire had around a 60 million population and a census more perfect than many parts of the world (to collect taxes, of course) but identification was still quite difficult and aggravated even more because there were a maximum of 17 men names and the women received the name of the family in feminine and a number (Prima for First, Secunda for Second…). A lot of people had the same exact name.
So the Roman proved the citizenship by inscribing themselves (or the slaves when they freed them) in the census, usually accompanied with two witnesses. Roman inscribed in the census were citizens and used an iron or bronze ring to prove it. With Augustus, those that could prove a wealth of more than 400,000 sesterces were part of a privileged class called Equites (knights) that came from the original nobles that could afford a horse. The Equites were middle-high class and wore a bronze or gold ring to prove it, with the famous Angusticlavia (a tunic with an expensive red-purple twin line). Senators (those with a wealth of more than 1,000,000 sesterces) also used the gold ring and the Laticlave, a broad band of purple in the tunic.

So the rings were very important to tell from a glimpse of eye if a traveller was a citizen, an equites or a senator, or legionary. People sealed and signed letters with the rings and its falsification could bring death.
The fugitive slaves didn’t have rings but iron collars with texts like “If found, return me to X” which also helped to recognize them. The domesticus slaves (the ones that lived in houses) didn’t wore the collar but sometimes were marked. A ring discovered 50 years ago is now believed to possibly be the ring of Pontius Pilate himself, and it was the same copper-bronze metal as this one. As with all our items it comes complete with our certificate of authenticity.

Code: 22976Price: 495.00 GBP


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A Superb Samurai Signed Wakazashi Late Koto to Early Shinto Era
Signed Bishu Osafune ju Masaharu Koto era circa 1600. With a most attractive Maru Gata signed Tsuba for wakazashi antique Japanese traditional forged iron Tsuba depicted a Chrysanthemum Imperial Kamon. Natural deep patina. Hand stamped copper fushi and Iron higo style kashira. Gold silk binding over menuki and gianrt rayskin. Brown ishime lacquer saya with kodzuka pocket, with a late iron handled kodzuka [side knife] decorated with tokebari shishi lion dogs. Bright polish blade with nice clear hamon.

Code: 22975Price: 2350.00 GBP


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A Very Large Size Imperial Roman Bronze Ring Augustus Caeser Period
The very same size, shape and form of ring worn by two of the Imperial Ceaser's, both Augustus and Tiberius. Part of a superb original museum grade collection we have acquired of Roman rings, also with some medieval and Norman rings as well. They are both clearly wearing their identical size and shaped rings on both of the surviving original Roman bronze statues of the emperors. Augustus Caeser and Tiberius Caeser both wore that ring type, engraved with the the symbol of a lituus, the mark of a Roman Augur [a type of sorcerer]. Augustus Caeser was indeed an auger himself, as was Pompey. The engraved device shows an opposing pair of Lituus, or priest's staffs. These were wands carried, as symbols of office, by ancient Roman augurs and used in carrying out the rituals for the foretelling of future events, what was later called sorcery. An augur was a highly esteemed priest and official in the classical Roman world. His main role was the practice of augury: Interpreting the will of the gods by studying the flight of birds – whether they were flying in groups or alone, what noises they made as they flew, direction of flight, and what kind of birds they were. This was known as "taking the auspices".

The augural ceremony and function of the augur was central to any major undertaking in Roman society – public or private – including matters of war, commerce, and religion. Augurs sought the divine will regarding any proposed course of action which might affect Rome's pax, fortuna, and salus (peace, good fortune, and well-being) We show an ancient Bronze Statue of Tiberius as Pontifex Maximus-[over 8 feet high]-ca. 37 AD-discovered in Herculaneum, in the-Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Napoli. Tiberius is wearing an augur sorcerers ring, also we show a picture from a full original statue of Augustus Caeser, and he too wears his sorcerer's [augur's] ring. A heavy grade good sized bronze ring in very nice condition and fine aged patina. Octavian was also an augur. Haverfield surmises that the choice of "Augustus" as the name might also have meant to overshadow the legend "AUG" on coins issued by his defeated enemy Pompey' – where "AUG" signifies Pompey's status as an augur, defeated with the help of Augustus' superior augury. Augustus chose to be addressed differently during his rise to power and success to accrue nothing less than reverence from the Roman people. He was born Gaius Octavius from his biological father and later expanded to the name Gaius Julius Caesar Octavianus, as he was named Caesar’s son and heir by his will in 45 BC. The meaning of the name Augustus, which was bestowed upon him by the Senate on 16th January 27 BC, carried with it ideas of superhuman status, from the Latin ‘augere‘ meaning ‘to increase’, connected also with ‘augurium‘ and the religious connotations of augury, further linking Augustus into the realms of Romulus, the founder of Rome, ‘and elevated him beyond mortal limits’. In 27 BC, the Senate agreed to officially and legally recognise Julius Caesar as a god, cementing the legislative amendments he made in his time as dictator and subsequently condemning objections. In this move, Octavian ‘was now able to describe himself as divi filius – son of a god’, ignoring his adoption into the Caesar family tree, but ‘son of a new god and as such “holy” and venerable himself’. In his Res Gestae Divi Augusti, Augustus describes that laurels symbolic of his adoptive father were placed at his door that day, a shrub which also links to the god of music, Apollo, further cementing Augustus’ belief in his strong connections with the god. Appealing to his connections with Apollo, in October 28 BC, Augustus ‘dedicated a huge new Temple of Apollo on the Palatine Hill near his home’ to give thanks for the god’s assistance in his substantial victory at Actium, which is frequently described by poets as a decisive victory thanks to ‘Actian Apollo’s interventions. Augustus mentions this temple in his Res Gestae Divi Augusti, a signal of his pride in his achievements and a reminder to readers of his connection with the god. The form of this ring is in traditional Roman bronze, and it is more likely Augustus's personal ring would have been gold, unless of course, he wore his original Augur's ring, when title of Augur was bestowed upon him, when he was known as Octavian, long before he became emperor. As with all our items it comes complete with our certificate of authenticity.

Code: 22973Price: 265.00 GBP

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