HOME PAGECONTACT USABOUT USANNOUNCEMENTSTERMSON-LINE SHOPVIEW BASKETPRIVACY POLICY


click for more images

A Very Good Victorian Horn Handle Dagger Stick
The handle has a silver ferrule with a button catch release, the dagger is thus extracted by means of pressing the button which releases the handle lock and enables the drawing the hidden dagger [fixed into the horn handle] from the bamboo haft. The blade is of two stage form of rectangular form at the base and then a blade of a four sided diamond form of nice quality. The horn handle has a most intriguing two hand carved cuts at the tip, this is often a old fashioned traditional of hand marking, once used on both pistols to knives, to represent the number of foes slain. This is a cane intended for close quarter action. The sword stick or cane was in its day ideal for defensive action, but the dagger stick was for both offensive or defensive, ideal for use in a crowd or a hand to hand conflict in most confined quarters of any bustling city. As an antique collectable it is simply awesome. A startling and most collectable conversation piece, worthy of the legendary Sherlock Holmes himself, in fact, more likely a tool of the diabolical genius, and arch nemeses of Holmes, Professor Moriarty . One can only imagine what perils and heinous adversities that it's original owner, who had this awesome cane commissioned, must have feared, dreaded or even instigated. The name “Bartitsu” might well have been completely forgotten if not for a chance mention by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in one of his Sherlock Holmes mystery stories. In the Adventure of the Empty House (1903), Holmes explained that he had escaped the clutches of his enemy Professor Moriarty through his knowledge of “bartitsu, or Japanese wrestling”. Using a walking cane with or without hidden blade. 35.5 inches long overall 10 inch blade. An original antique collectable for display purposes only34 inches long overall, blade 13.25 inches

Code: 22840Price: 795.00 GBP


click for more images

A Superb, Rare, 19th Century Royal Scots Greys Bearskin Plume Holder
The Royal Scots Greys was a cavalry regiment of the British Army from 1707 until 1971, when they amalgamated with the 3rd Carabiniers (Prince of Wales's Dragoon Guards) to form The Royal Scots Dragoon Guards (Carabiniers and Greys).

The regiment's history began in 1678, when three independent troops of Scots Dragoons were raised. In 1681, these troops were regimented to form The Royal Regiment of Scots Dragoons, numbered the 4th Dragoons in 1694. They were already mounted on grey horses by this stage and were already being referred to as the Grey Dragoons. In 1707, they were renamed The Royal North British Dragoons (North Britain then being the envisaged common name for Scotland), but were already being referred to as the Scots Greys. In 1713, they were renumbered the 2nd Dragoons as part of a deal between the commands of the English Army and the Scottish Army when the two were in the process of being unified into the British Army. They were also sometimes referred to, during the first Jacobite uprising, as Portmore's Dragoons. In 1877, their nickname was finally made official when they became the 2nd Dragoons (Royal Scots Greys), which was inverted in 1921 to The Royal Scots Greys (2nd Dragoons).

Code: 22839Price: 295.00 GBP


click for more images

A British Officers WW1 Wolseley Tropical Helmet Gallipoli & Egypt Campaign
The Wolseley pattern helmet is a distinctive British design developed and popularised in the late 19th and early 20th century. It was the official designation for the universal sun helmet worn by the British Army from 1899 to 1948 and described in the 1900 Dress Regulations as "the Wolseley pattern cork helmet". With its swept-back brim it provided greater protection from the sun than the old Colonial pattern helmet, and its use was soon widespread among British personnel serving overseas as well as some Canadian units

Code: 22838Price: On Request


click for more images

Lt. Colonel & Brigadier Army 'Officer's' Brodie Helmet by W Bernard & Son
The Brodie pattern halmet with rimmed edge designed in WW1. Used by Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers Colonel [later Brigadier] B.B. Kennett OBE, CBE, of the 59th (Motor) Divisional Signals No 4 Line of Communication Signals, in the Western Dessert Campaign and El Alamein. It is said that without Colonel Kennetts 59th Montgomery could not have had his 1000 tanks ready to destroy Rommel's Africa Corps. The Corps of REME is known as being forged in the heat of battle. During the Battle of El Alamein in its earliest days, the Corps ensured that over 1000 tanks were ready to join the fight. Since then, the Corps has evolved to lead as the forefront of engineering for the Army, and the engineering industry as a whole. Maker label on the interior crosspiece of Walter Barnard & Son of Jermyn St. London. The 1st Lancashire Engineer Volunteer Corps was a Volunteer unit of Britain's Royal Engineers, first raised in 1860. It went on to spin off a unit of fortress engineers and provided a signals training centre during World War I. Its successor units provided signal support for West Lancashire Territorial Army (TA) formations in the early stages of World War II, and for Eighth Army HQ during the Second Battle of El Alamein, the advance to Tunis, invasion of Sicily and through Italy, ending the war in Austria. 59th Division also mobilised in Western Command, but early in 1940 the divisional signal unit was withdrawn and reorganised as 4th Army Signals. It was redesignated again in May 1940 as No 4 Line of Communication Signals, and in September it was sent to the Middle East where it operated in the rear areas of Western Desert Force and later Eighth Army during the Western Desert Campaign. It also provided signal detachments to British forces operating in Eritrea during the East African Campaign and in Palestine during the Syria–Lebanon Campaign. Brigadier Kennett co authored a seminal work, 'The Craftsmen of the Army The story of the Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers'. With its forward by HRH THE Duke of Edinburgh. He was a friend of his commanding officer at El Alamein, Field Marshal Montgomery, and a trench warfare serving Lieut. A young British Army officer veteran of WW1.

Code: 22837Price: On Request


click for more images

A Superb Victorian Carved Horn Handled Sword Stick
Ribbed and black lacquered top section to the handle and black lacquered bamboo bottom haft. A light weight narrow cane but most strong and very sound. A great Victorian conversational and collector's piece, and one can ponder over of the kind of gentleman who would have sought and required such a piece of personal defence paraphernalia. The first sword canes were made for nobility by leading sword cutlers. Sixteenth century sword canes were often bequeathed in wills. Sword canes became more popular as the streets became less safe. Society dictated it mandatory that gentlemen of the 18th and especially 19th centuries would wear a cane when out and about, and it was common for the well-dressed gentleman to own and sport canes in a variety of styles, including a good and sound sword cane. Although one likes to think that jolly old Victorian England had a London full of cheerful cockneys and laddish chimney sweeps, it was also plagued with political intrigue, nefarious characters and caddish swine prowling the endless foggy thoroughfares and dimly lit passageways. The swordstick was a popular fashion accessory for the wealthy during the 18th and 19th centuries. While the weapon's origins are unknown, it is apparent that the cane-sword's popularity peaked when decorative swords were steadily being replaced by canes as a result of the rising popularity of firearms, and the lessening influence of swords and other small arms. 36 inches long overall, square section blade blade 24 inches long, horn handle 3 inches wide. An original antique collectable for display purposes only

Code: 22836Price: 675.00 GBP


click for more images

A Superb Mid 19th Century Webley-Bentley Double Action Revolver
Retailed by Ward, around .36 calibre, 5 shot, with almost all original mirror blue to the barrel also engraved Improved. The gun has a pivoting frame mounted loading lever that is similar to the Kerr patent lever. Fienely checquered grips and fine scroll engraving the frame. On December 4, 1852 Joseph Bentley received British Patent No. 960/1852 for a percussion revolver, and on April 4 of 1854 received an additional patent for “improvements to the revolver”, No. 768/1854. Bentley was a long time Birmingham gunmaker, who specialized in handguns and was listed in the directories of the time as a “Pistol Maker”. He opened his business in 1829 at 11 Steelhouse Lane, where he was listed as a “Saddle Pistol Maker”, specializing in the single-shot, muzzleloading “military sized” handguns of the period. By 1839, he was working towards producing the new, innovative repeating pistols and received his first British Patent, shared with gunmaker George Stocker. Their patent, No. 8,024 issued on April 9 of that year, was for a pepperbox revolver. In 1844, he received British Patent 10,280 for “nipples mounted parallel with the bore of guns”, a concept essential to the eventual manufacture of revolving percussion pistols with a multi-shot cylinder and a single barrel, rather than the simpler “pepperbox” concept. It was, however, Bentley’s 1852 patent for a self-cocking (double action) revolver design that would make his name synonymous with many of the major British handgun makers of the mid-19th century. His design was for a double-action only revolver with an open frame, a spurless hammer. Rather than incorporating a half-cock in the mechanism to free the cylinder to rotate for loading, Bentley devised a simple hammer nose safety that allowed the hammer to be rested just off the cones on the rear of the cylinder, with the safety pressing against the frame. Pulling the trigger to fire the gun automatically disengaged the safety device. These reliable and reasonably priced double-action revolvers were popular export items and were available for sale around the world. Even Confederate purchasing agents purchased these revolvers, as they were much less expensive than the competing Adams, Tranter & Kerr patterns. The Pratt Roll, which is a list of revolvers that details the 15 handguns in the possession of Company H of the 18th Virginia Cavalry in July of 1864 lists 3 Webley / Bentley revolvers, as well as 4 of “unknown” pattern. The balance of the revolvers are 7 Kerr’s & 2 Tranter’s. This indicates that even in this small sample of CS used revolvers, 20% were of the Webley and/or Bentley patterns. A handful of examples of similar English double action revolvers are known with pre-war Southern retailer marks, usually from New Orleans retailers. New Orleans seems to have been a major source for imported English revolvers prior to the Civil War. These include gun retailer marked by Thomas Bailey and D. Kernaghan & Co, both of New Orleans. While there are no direct Confederate contracts known for these pattern of arms, some Confederate correspondence exists that suggest the more reasonably priced double action revolvers were purchased primarily by speculators for importation to the Confederacy, in both 80-Bore and 54-Bore. It appears that most of these guns were imported through Texas ports and many saw use in the Western Theater and the Trans-Mississippi Theater. There are additional examples of Webley-Bentley and Birmingham style double action revolvers with Confederate provenance. These include a gun in the collection of the Museum of the Confederacy which is attributed to Lt. Robert Aunspaugh of the 10th Battalion Virginia Heavy Artillery, the gun of Colonel John Smith of the 20th Alabama Infantry (ex-Bond collection) and one reported to be engraved to General William Mahone

Code: 22835Price: 1150.00 GBP


click for more images

A Very Fine Gambler's Dirk cum Boot Knife, Mid 19th Century
Carved spiral grip with crescent pommel, incredible and immensely powerful four edged scalloped blade, that could likely penetrate a Jerry can!. Steel quillon block with lobed quillon. Original formed German silver scabbard with hanging ring. A very fine quality dirk, perfect for concealment for the gamblers of the Wild West frontier, and the Mississippi river boat gamblers. Ivory grip with hairline cracking. Whether on a riverboat atop the Mighty Mississippi, or in the smoky dimness of a mining camp saloon, a lucky draw could turn a broken man into a winner. In the days of the frontier west, poker was king with the mustachioed likes of Wild Bill Hickok, Doc Holliday, “Canada” Bill Jones, Wyatt Earp, Bat Masterson, and hundreds of others.

In the old west towns of Deadwood, Dodge City, Tombstone, and Virginia City, gamblers played with their back to the wall and their guns at their sides, as dealers dealt games with names such as Chuck-A-Luck, Three Card Monte, High Dice, and Faro, by far the favourite in the wild west saloons. Gambling took many forms on riverboats. Gambling with one's life with the boilers aside, there were sharks around willing to fleece the unsuspecting rube. As cities passed ordinances against gaming houses in town, the cheats moved to the unregulated waters of the Mississippi aboard river steamers.

There was also gambling with the racing of boats up the river. Bets were made on a favourite vessel. Pushing the boilers hard in races would also cause fires to break out on the wooden deck structures. A near identical example sold in Butterfields Auction, from the Allan S Kelly Collection of 19th Century American and English Dirks, in San Francisco in July 1994, 25 years ago, Lot number 2401, for $935. Size 8 inches long overall, blade 4 inches. As is usual for these small knives it has no maker markings

Code: 22834Price: 775.00 GBP


click for more images

A Superb Quality & Very Fine British Ivory Handled Victorian Sword Stick
This is one of the highest quality English examples we have seen in quite a while. Hand carved ivory handle of great quality and condition, with no cracks or splits, Malacca haft and triple edged long blade, with hallmarked London silver collar. A great Victorian conversational and collector's piece, and one can ponder over of the kind of gentleman who would have sought and required such a piece of personal defence paraphernalia. Although one likes to think that jolly old Victorian England had a London full of cheerful cockneys and laddish chimney sweeps, it was also plagued with political intrigue, nefarious characters and caddish swine prowling the endless foggy thoroughfares and dimly lit passageways. The swordstick was a popular fashion accessory for the wealthy during the 18th and 19th centuries. While the weapon's origins are unknown, it is apparent that the cane-sword's popularity peaked when decorative swords were steadily being replaced by canes as a result of the rising popularity of firearms, and the lessening influence of swords and other small arms.

The first sword canes were made for nobility by leading sword cutlers. Sixteenth century sword canes were often bequeathed in wills. Sword canes became more popular as the streets became less safe. Society dictated it mandatory that gentlemen of the 18th and especially 19th centuries would wear a cane when out and about, and it was common for the well-dressed gentleman to own and sport canes in a variety of styles, including a good and sound sword cane. Overall 34.5 inches long, blade 27.75 inches. An original antique collectable for display purposes only

Code: 22833Price: 1125.00 GBP


click for more images

A Beautiful, Victorian, Horn Handled Secret 'Hidden' Dagger Cane.
The handle has a rotating scallop engraved copper ferrule and the dagger is thus extracted by means of rotating the ferrule which releases the handle lock and enables the drawing the hidden dagger [fixed into the horn handle] from the Malacca haft. The concealment is so innocently neat and beautifully constructed one would never guess it held such a hidden secret. The blade is of the stiletto four sided form, of superb quality, with fancy geometric and floral pattern etching. This is a cane intended for close quarter action. The sword stick or cane was in its day ideal for defensive action, but the dagger stick was for both offensive or defensive, ideal for use in a crowd or a hand to hand conflict in most confined quarters of any bustling city. As an antique collectable it is simply awesome. A startling and most collectable conversation piece, worthy of the legendary Sherlock Holmes himself, in fact, more likely a tool of the diabolical genius, and arch nemeses of Holmes, Professor Moriarty . One can only imagine what perils and heinous adversities that it's original owner, who had this awesome cane commissioned, must have feared, dreaded or even instigated. The name “Bartitsu” might well have been completely forgotten if not for a chance mention by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in one of his Sherlock Holmes mystery stories. In the Adventure of the Empty House (1903), Holmes explained that he had escaped the clutches of his enemy Professor Moriarty through his knowledge of “bartitsu, or Japanese wrestling”. Using a walking cane with or without hidden blade. 35.5 inches long overall 10 inch blade. An original antique collectable for display purposes only

Code: 22832Price: 995.00 GBP


click for more images

A Superb Shinto Period Samurai Katana By Bizen Osafune Sukesada
Crica 1650. This beautiful Katana is most intriguing in that it is not only signed by one of the great schools of samurai swordsmiths but also inscribed as to whom is was made for. We have sent a copy of the inscription to Japan for a translation as it is somewhat complex to translate. Fully matching suite of koshirae all decorated with the gold imperial chrysanthemum, including the superb tsuba. Superb habaki [blade collar with superb mirror shakudo patina with gold lines. Being descendant of the Ichimonji Line they were also known to have made some of the finest swords. This is where they really shine, swordsmiths such as Yozosaemon Sukesada were known to make masterpiece blades that outshone the vast majority of the time period. In fact Yozosaemon is considered one of the representative swordsmiths of the Era, going hand in hand with names like Muramasa of the Soshu/Sengo Tradition and Kanemoto of the Mino Tradition. Sukesada swords were also popular with those in high ranks and we see many tachi and longer katana being made, these were often of exceptional quality and were quite deserving of their Jchimonji lineage. Sukesada swords would spread throughout Japan, with their home forges being in Bizen province. This however ; would not last. The great flood of the Yoshii River around 1590 signalled a death toll to the Sukesada line. This flood hit Bizen province hard and wiped out nearly all of the Sukesada forges, leaving only several offshoots of the Sukesada family swordsmiths to carry out the tradition, such the Shinto period Yokoyama Sukesada family swords. The Sukesada tradition struggled to survive and eventually died out partway through the Shinto Era as it never really came close to reaching the Majesty and quality of its predecessor and mainline schools. The great flood essentially marked the end for one of the Koto Era’s greatest sword making traditions. The blade has a fabulous hamon double hamon, some thin, aged edge delamination thinning around the top of the hi on either side. The saya is original Edo period black lacquer with a delightful horizontal thin line décor, it has overall light bruising throughout. 27.5 inch blade from tsuba to tip.

Code: 22830Price: 7995.00 GBP

Website designed & maintained by Concept500