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An Original WW2 British Special Constabulary Recruitment Poster
Published for HMG by Fosh and Cross Ltd London. A propaganda information and recruitment poster. Britain re-created the World War I Ministry of Information for the duration of World War II to generate propaganda to influence the population towards support for the war effort. A wide range of media was employed aimed at local and overseas audiences. Traditional forms such as newspapers and posters were joined by new media including cinema (film), newsreels and radio. A wide range of themes were addressed, fostering hostility to the enemy, support for allies, and specific pro war projects such as conserving metal and growing vegetables. In 1940 in particular, Winston Churchill made many calls for the British to fight on, and for British units to fight until they died rather than submit. His calls for fight to victory inspired a hardening of public opinion. Determination raised the numbers of the Home Guard and inspired a willingness to fight to the last ditch, in a manner rather similar to Japanese determination, and the slogan "You can always take one with you" was used in the grimmest times of the war. British victories were announced to the public for morale purposes, and broadcast to Germany for purposes of undermining morale.

Even during Dunkirk, an optimistic spin was put on how the soldiers were eager to return.

When the U-boat commander Günther Prien vanished with his submarine U-47, Churchill personally informed the House of Commons, and radio broadcasts to Germany asked, "Where is Prien?" until Germany was forced to acknowledge his loss.

The turn of the war made BBC's war commentaries much more stirring.
Good condition 14.75 inches x 9.75 inches

Code: 20874Price: 200.00 GBP


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A Japanese Cavalry Sabre Type 32 1899 'Ko' Pattern
With an associated blade, probably imported. The hilt back strap Type 32 model, introduced in 1899, is chequered steel (commonly blackened). The wood grips are also chequered. Leather finger loop. Japanese Type 32 (Model 1899) ‘Ko’ Pattern Sword. The type as were often manufactured at the Tokyo Hohei Kosho Arsenal in Tokyo between 1899 and 1923 and issued to Cavalry NCOs (Other Arms Non-Comms were issued with the slightly shorter Type 32 ‘Otsu’ Pattern). This sword replaced the Type 25 (Model 1892) and equipped Imperial Japanese Army Cavalry NCO’s during the Russo Japanese War (1905), WW1 (1914 – 1918), Manchuria (1937 – 1941) and WW2 (1941 – 1945). No scabbard 32 inch blade

Code: 20873Price: 275.00 GBP


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An Original WW2 British Special Constabulary Recruitment Poster
Published for HMG by Fosh and Cross Ltd London. A propaganda information and recruitment poster. Britain re-created the World War I Ministry of Information for the duration of World War II to generate propaganda to influence the population towards support for the war effort. A wide range of media was employed aimed at local and overseas audiences. Traditional forms such as newspapers and posters were joined by new media including cinema (film), newsreels and radio. A wide range of themes were addressed, fostering hostility to the enemy, support for allies, and specific pro war projects such as conserving metal and growing vegetables. In 1940 in particular, Winston Churchill made many calls for the British to fight on, and for British units to fight until they died rather than submit. His calls for fight to victory inspired a hardening of public opinion. Determination raised the numbers of the Home Guard and inspired a willingness to fight to the last ditch, in a manner rather similar to Japanese determination, and the slogan "You can always take one with you" was used in the grimmest times of the war. British victories were announced to the public for morale purposes, and broadcast to Germany for purposes of undermining morale.

Even during Dunkirk, an optimistic spin was put on how the soldiers were eager to return.

When the U-boat commander Günther Prien vanished with his submarine U-47, Churchill personally informed the House of Commons, and radio broadcasts to Germany asked, "Where is Prien?" until Germany was forced to acknowledge his loss.

The turn of the war made BBC's war commentaries much more stirring.
Good condition 14.5 inches x 9.5 inches

Code: 20872Price: 225.00 GBP


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16th Century Indian Firangi Sword Circa 1500's Basket Hilt Form
The name ‘Firangi’ (Foreigner) was apparently given to these swords somewhat later in the 17th Century, as they were mounted with European (Foreign) blades, imported by the Portugese, which were highly valued. Some blades were locally made in the European style. The blades were mounted on the ‘Khanda’ style hilt and with the long spike extending from the pommel which enabled them to be used as two handed swords. The firangi sword characteristically had a straight blade of backsword form (single edged). The blade often incorporated one, two, or three fullers (grooves) and had a spear-tip shaped point. The sword could be used to both cut and thrust. Examples with narrow rapier blades have survived, though in small numbers. The hilt was of the type sometimes called the "Indian basket-hilt" and was identical to that of another Indian straight-bladed sword the khanda. The hilt afforded a substantial amount of protection for the hand and had a prominent spike projecting from the pommel which could be grasped, resulting in a two-handed capability for the sword. Like other contemporary Indian swords the hilt of the firangi was usually of iron and the tang of the blade was attached to the hilt using a very strong resin, additionally, the hilt to blade connection was reinforced by projections from the hilt onto either face of the forte of the blade which were riveted together though a hole passing through the blade. Because of its length the firangi is usually regarded as primarily a cavalry weapon. Illustrations suggest a 16th-century date for the development of the sword, though early examples appear to have had simpler cross-guard hilts, similar to those of the talwar. The sword has been especially associated with the Marathas, who were famed for their cavalry. However, the firangi was widely used by the Mughals and those peoples who came under their rule, including Sikhs and Rajputs. Images of Mughal potentates holding firangis, or accompanied by retainers carrying their masters' firangis, suggest that the sword became a symbol of martial virtue and power. Photographs of Indian officers of Hodson's Horse (an irregular cavalry unit raised by the British) show that the firangi was still in active use at the time of the Indian Mutiny in 1857-58 The khanda can generally be a double-edge but can be a single edged straight sword. It is often featured in religious iconography, theatre and art depicting the ancient history of India. Some communities venerate the weapon as a symbol of Shiva. It is a common weapon in the martial arts in the Indian subcontinent. Khanda often appears in Hindu, Buddhist and Sikh scriptures and art The word khanda has its origins in the Sanskrit meaning "to break, divide, cut, destroy". Used from the time of Abu'l-Fath Jalal-ud-din Muhammad Akbar (15 October 1542 – 27 October 1605 ), popularly known as Akbar I literally "the great" and later Akbar the Great, he was the third Mughal emperor, who reigned from 1556 to 1605.
29 inch blade to hilt, 35 inches overall

Code: 20871Price: 795.00 GBP


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A King George IIIrd Dagger With Napoleonic Mystical Symbol Blade
A heavy quality dagger bearing a wide double edged blade likely made from a reduced length early broadsword. Beautifully engraved on both sides of the blade with a crescent moon with a face, a stand of arms and a sunburst also with a face above, topped with a star. Cast brass hilt with rococo swags beneath a face of a beast to both sides, an offset pommel surmounted with another face. Upswept curved quillon.

Code: 20870Price: 695.00 GBP


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A Most Impressive & Substantial Edo Japanese Samurai Battle Katana
Due to its size and build most likely for use by a horse mounted samurai. Made circa 1600 to 1650 and mounted in all original Edo fittings, saya and tsuba. Hand pierced iron circular tsuba to represent sea spray. Plain fushi kashira. For roughly a thousand years, from about the 800s to the late 1800s, warfare in Japan was dominated by an elite class of warriors known as the samurai. Horses were their special weapons: only samurai were allowed to ride horses in battle.

Like European knights, the samurai served a lord (daimyo). In 1600, after a long period of conflict among rival daimyo, the victorious Tokugawa Shogun discouraged armed civil warfare, maintained the samurai's traditional status, so internecine warfare continued unabated. The sword and the horse remained symbols of their power.
By the time Ieyasu Tokugawa unified Japan under his rule at the Battle of Sekigahara in 1600, only samurai were permitted to wear the sword. A samurai was recognized by his carrying the feared daisho, the ‘big sword, little sword’ of the warrior. These were the battle katana, the ‘big sword,’ and the wakizashi, the ‘little sword.’ The name katana derives from two old Japanese written characters or symbols: kata, meaning’side,’ and na, or ‘edge.’ Thus a katana is a single-edged sword that has had few rivals in the annals of war, either in the East or the West. Because the sword was the main battle weapon of Japan’s knightly man-at-arms (although spears and bows were also carried), an entire martial art grew up around learning how to use it. This was kenjutsu, the art of sword fighting, or kendo in its modern, non-warlike incarnation. The importance of studying kenjutsu and the other martial arts such as kyujutsu, the art of the bow, was so critical to the samurai — a very real matter of life or death — that Miyamoto Musashi, most renowned of all swordsmen, warned in his classic The Book of Five Rings: ‘The science of martial arts for warriors requires construction of various weapons and understanding the properties of the weapons. A member of a warrior family who does not learn to use weapons and understand the specific advantages of each weapon would seem to be somewhat uncultivated.’ European knights and Japanese samurai have some interesting similarities. Both groups rode horses and wore armour. Both came from a wealthy upper class. And both were trained to follow strict codes of moral behaviour. In Europe, these ideals were called chivalry; the samurai code was called Bushido, "the way of the warrior." The rules of chivalry and Bushido both emphasize honour, self-control, loyalty, bravery, and military training. 29 inch blade.

Code: 20869Price: 4450.00 GBP


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Super Looking Victorian 1856 Pattern Tower Armoury Two Band Enfield Rifle.
.577 calibre. It has a superbly patinated walnut stock that looks absolutely stupendous. Tower marked lock [now difficult to read], with a nicely struck large crown stamp, and barrel maker stamped on the underside by I Hollis and Son [IHS] an ordnance supplier of rifle parts and rifles complete. Good and tight action. The best and last muzzle loading rifle issued to the British Army. Rear ladder site. 33 inch barrel. The P-1856 was the first short rifle in the new .577 calibre family of muskets made by the Enfield factory and the Tower Armoury in England for the British Army. The long three band rifle musket which was used by the regular line infantry was introduced in 1853 and the model is known as the P-1853. The P-1856 was issued to all sergeants of Line Regiments, the Rifle Brigade and the 60th Regiment, the Cape Mounted Rifles and the Royal Canadian Rifles. Unlike the P-53 that was called a "rifle musket" the P-56 was called a "short rifle" or just a "rifle" to separate them from the long three band P-53 with a 39" barrel and the short carbine with 24" barrel. The P-56 had a 33" barrel. The P-56 replaced the old Baker and Brunswick rifles which was used in the British Army prior to the adoption of the minié system in 1851. The steel barrel and fitting are overall russetted. Replaced rammer.

Code: 20868Price: 995.00 GBP


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17th Century English Sword Possibly Carried by An Admiral Or Similar Status
This is only the second such sword we have had such quite like this by the same maker in the past 20 years and the first we had in 20 years was only two years ago. A near pair to a sword carried by Vice Admiral Sir Christopher Myngs and possibly by the same maker as the Admiral's sword. In very nice overall condition with a signed double edged armourer's marked blade by Hn.Vincent. Cast bronze hilt beautifully relief decorated with cornucopia and seated figures bearing baskets of fruit. A most beautiful sword made in the mid 17th century during the reign of King Charles and used continuously through the interregnum, the restoration and into the era up to Queen Anne. We show a portrait of Vice Admiral Sir Christopher Myngs holding a near pair to this sword. The form of sword that was carried and used by admirals and senior naval officers for almost 100 years. This sword should be categorised as the transitional Walloon type. The Walloon gained most of it's popularity during the English Civil War era and with the addition of pas d'ane to the guard they transitioned to the next generation of officer's swords called small swords. Vice Admiral Sir Christopher Myngs (1625–1666), English naval officer and pirate, came of a Norfolk family and was a relative of another admiral, Sir Cloudesley Shovell. Samuel Pepys' story of his humble birth, in explanation of his popularity, is said to be erroneous. His name is often given as Mings. In 1655, he was appointed to the frigate Marston Moor, the crew of which was on the verge of mutiny. His firm measures quelled the insubordinate spirit, and he took the vessel out to the West Indies, arriving in January 1656 on Jamaica where he became the sub commander of the naval flotilla on the Jamaica Station, until the summer of 1657.
In February 1658, he returned to Jamaica as naval commander, acting as a commerce raider during the Anglo-Spanish War. During these actions he got a reputation for unnecessary cruelty, sacking and massacring entire towns in command of whole fleets of buccaneers. In 1658, after beating off a Spanish attack, he raided the coast of South-America; failing to capture a Spanish treasure fleet, he destroyed Tolú and Santa Maria in present-day Colombia instead; in 1659 he plundered Cumaná, Puerto Cabello and Coro in present-day Venezuela.
The Spanish government considered him a common pirate and mass murderer, protesting to no avail to the English government of Oliver Cromwell about his conduct. Because he had shared half of the bounty of his 1659 raid, about a quarter of a million pounds, with the buccaneers against the explicit orders of Edward D'Oyley, the English Commander of Jamaica, he was arrested for embezzlement and sent back to England in the Marston Moor in 1660.
The Restoration government retained him in his command however, and in August 1662 he was sent to Jamaica commanding the Centurion in order to resume his activities as commander of the Jamaica Station, despite the fact the war with Spain had ended. This was part of a covert English policy to undermine the Spanish dominion of the area, by destroying as much as possible of the infrastructure. In 1662 Myngs decided that the best way to accomplish this was to employ the full potential of the buccaneers by promising them the opportunity for unbridled plunder and rapine. He had the complete support of the new governor, Lord Windsor, who fired a large contingent of soldiers to fill Myngs's ranks with disgruntled men. That year he attacked Santiago de Cuba and took and sacked the town despite its strong defences. In 1663 buccaneers from all over the Caribbean joined him for the announced next expedition. Myngs directed the largest buccaneer fleet as yet assembled, fourteen ships strong and with 1400 pirates aboard, among them such notorious privateers as Henry Morgan and Abraham Blauvelt, and sacked San Francisco de Campeche in February. Ebonised wooden grip with Turk's head ferrules
28.5 inch blade.

Code: 20867Price: 1275.00 GBP


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Late Napoleonic Period Pistol By The Great Le Page of Paris
Traditionally known as the Boutet pattern, a percussion pistol made by one of the two greatest and collectable makers of France. Chequered grip, octagonal butt cap, octagonal barrel heavy scroll engraved with Le Page of Paris, flared muzzle octagonal barrel with multi groove rifling. Louis Pigny opened his modest shop in rue Bailiff in 1717, received two royal warrants from King Louis XV, and passed his business on to his niece’s husband, Pierre Le Page.

Pierre, a very accomplished artillery and explosives manufacturer, became the supplier of firearms in Paris to the House of Orleans and the Maréchal Maurice de Saxe. He renamed the company Le Page, and acquired an excellent reputation among aristocratic clientele. He left the company to his nephew Jean Le Page.

Jean Le Page continued the success of his predecessors as gunsmith to the House of Orleans, King Louis XVI, of the First Consul Bonaparte and then Emperor Napoleon I and King Louis XVIII. The factory is famous for its pistols, guns, luxury white arms and page swords during the First French Empire. During this era, many technical innovations were made such as over oxygenated powder in 1810, a water resistant gun in 1817, and invented the fulminate percussion system for firearms which replaced the flintlock.

Jean Le Page cemented the company’s reputation and position in history. As a gunsmith he is mentioned in numerous pieces of literature, and the firearms produced during this period are those most sought after and displayed in museums and the like, particularly due to their often famous provenance. He was succeeded by his fourth child, Jean Andre Prosper Henri Le Page, in 1822.

In 1835, Jean Andre was named the ‘Arquebusier Ordinaire of the King, of the Duke of Orleans, and the Duke of Numours’. He expanded the international reputation of Le Page, taking part in many Paris Exhibitions. The French Military Commission ordered six hundred percussion lock guns with snap clasp in 1838. Jean Le Page also testified against Napoleon Bonaparte. His son in law took the reins in 1842, and soon made his nephew Emile Henri Faure Le Page his business partner.

Henri Le Page became the sole owner in 1868. The international clientele expanded, and he became a warranted supplier to the Russian Imperial Court. He received several medals throughout his career and was ordained Chevalier de la Legion d’Honneur in 1878, and Officer de la Legion d’Honneur in 1894. The hammer has a small fracture at the neck that we are attending to. The pistol has had an old crack repair at the buttstock and overall areas of use and aging, naturally this is comfortably reflected in the price.

Code: 20866Price: 990.00 GBP


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Reich Marshall Herman Goering Propaganda Poster With Luftwaffe Sword
In very good condition for age. Rarely surviving piece from the the pre war Germany.Weil wir einig sind, sind wir stark, weil wir stark sind, sind wir frei. ... Hermann Göring", " Because We Are United We Are Strong, Because We Are Strong We Are Free" 28th of February to 6th Martch 1938. [weekly slogans of the National Socialist German Workers' Party]. Another original copy of it is in the George C Marshall Foundation library During World War II, Marshall as Army Chief of Staff (1939–1945) was the most important military figure in the U.S. military establishment and of great significance in maintaining the Anglo-American coalition. After the war, he was named special ambassador to China (1945–1947), Secretary of State (1947–1949), President of the American Red Cross (1949–1950), and Secretary of Defense (1950–1951). In 1953 he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for his role in proposing, encouraging legislative action, and supporting the European Recovery Program (known as the Marshall Plan). For nearly 20 years he was a major U.S. leader, militarily, politically and morally, and he is still widely admired today.

Code: 20865Price: 245.00 GBP

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