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A Most Attractive Shinto Era Signed Katana Circa 1680
It has an amazing blade of great beauty. Showing an impressive undulating notare hamon somewhat based on sanbonsugi [three cedar pattern]. Signed Chikuzen ju [Kiyo?] Naga. Fine fushi kashira and old Shinto iron tsuba. Original Edo lacquer saya with abilone décor. Menuki in gold and shakudo of dragonfly on a bamboo stalk.

Code: 22246Price: 5450.00 GBP


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An Immensely Rare, Trafalgar Period French Naval Captain's Combat Sword
With blue and gilt blade. Almost all of the senior French naval captains and senior officers at Trafalgar could have carried a sword just as this, and this sword may even have been surrendered at Trafalgar itself. The official title is; Sabre d'officier du Marine, modele de Prairal an XII of 1804. Scabbard throat mount with a Mermaid with two tails and modest skirt on a sabre of the prairial model.
It was by formal decree, dated the 7th of Prairial of the year XII [May 28, 1804], that the French First Consul Napoleon Bonaparte approved the creation of the model of this stunning sabre. This is such a rare sword they are almost impossible to find, even in museums. The French naval officer's combat sword is a beautiful sabre and as so many warships of the French Napoleonic navy were captured or destroyed precious few survive. The British equivalent is the rare 1805 pattern Royal Naval officer's sword, which Nelson also took to at Trafalgar, but the French surviving equivalent, this sword, is at least 100 times the rarer sword. The last known example we know of, that came onto the open market several years ago, sold for, in excess of 8000 euros.
Sabre naval officer model of the 1st Prairial Year XII, guard a brass branch chiselled and gilded, bow body adorned with an anchor resting on two flags, half round langets chiselled with a radiant head, ebony grip with carved grooves; flat-backed blade, one hollow pan and lateral throat, blued and gilded in the third; leather scabbard with seam, two gilded and gilded brass fittings, the throat is provided with two long side hooks for the wearing of the sword with a belt or the harness, it is decorated with a mermaid with two tails, finely engraved with reeds; dart shaped shell; length 87.5 cm. Prairial was the ninth month in the French Republican Calendar. This month was named after the French word prairie, which means meadow. It was the name given to several ships.
Prairial was the third month of the spring quarter. He Battle of Trafalgar (21 October 1805) was a naval engagement fought by the British Royal Navy against the combined fleets of the French and Spanish Navies, during the War of the Third Coalition (August–December 1805) of the Napoleonic Wars (1796–1815).

Twenty-seven British ships of the line led by Admiral Lord Nelson aboard HMS Victory defeated thirty-three French and Spanish ships of the line under French Admiral Villeneuve. The battle took place in the Atlantic Ocean off the southwest coast of Spain, just west of Cape Trafalgar, near the town of Los Caños de Meca. The Franco-Spanish fleet lost twenty-two ships and the British lost none.

The victory confirmed the naval supremacy Britain had established during the course of the eighteenth century and it was achieved in part through Nelson's departure from the prevailing naval tactical orthodoxy of the day. Conventional practice at the time was for opposing fleets to engage each other in single parallel lines, in order to facilitate signalling and disengagement, and to maximise fields of fire and target areas. Nelson instead arranged his ships into two columns to sail perpendicularly into the enemy fleet's line.

During the battle, Nelson was shot by a French musketeer and he died shortly before the battle ended. Villeneuve was captured, along with his ship Bucentaure. He later attended Nelson's funeral while a captive on parole in Britain. Admiral Federico Gravina, the senior Spanish flag officer, escaped with the remnant of the fleet. He died five months later from wounds sustained during the battle. The battle resulted in 10 French ships captured,
one ship destroyed,
3,373 dead,
1,155 wounded,
over 4,000 men captured
Spain:
11 ships captured,
1,022 dead,
1,386 wounded,
3 to 4,000 captured
Total: about 15,000 The sword is 94.5 cm long overall in its scabbard

Code: 22245Price: 6750.00 GBP


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Very Long Ancient Koto Samurai Odachi Great Sword, 14th Century Genko War
An Odachi (large/great sword) also known as a nodachi, [field sword]. It was a type of very long traditionally made Japanese sword, used by the samurai class of ancient feudal Japan. The Chinese equivalent and 'cousin' for this type of sword in terms of weight and length is the miao dao, and the Western battlefield equivalent (though less similar) is the longsword or claymore. Odachi swordplay styles differed from that of other Japanese swords, focusing on downward cuts.As battlefield weapons, Odachi were too long for samurai to carry on their waists like normal swords. There were two methods in which they could be carried: One was to carry it on one's back. However, this was seen as impractical as it was impossible for the wielder to draw it quickly. The other method was simply to carry the sheathed Odachi by hand. The trend during the Muromachi era was for the samurai carrying the Odachi to have a follower to help draw it.

One possible use of Odachi is as large anti-cavalry weapons, to strike down the horse as it approaches. Alternatively, it could be used as a cavalry-on-cavalry weapon, with the long reach, increased weight and slashing area of the blade offering some advantages over spears, lances and smaller swords.
Apart from the blade polish this sword has been untouched for likely 250 years. Almost 700 years old. Double hi to the very long blade, o-sukashi Koto period iron tsuba and fushi kashira superbly decorated with takebori insects. The Genko War (1331–1333) also known as the Genko Incident was a civil war in Japan which marked the fall of the Kamakura shogunate and end of the power of the Hojo clan. The war thus preceded the Nanboku-cho period and the rise of the Ashikaga shogunate. Genko is the name of the Japanese era corresponding to the period 1331–1334.

Throughout much of the Kamakura period, the shogunate was controlled by the Hojo clan, whose members held the title of shikken (regent for the shogun), and passed it on within the clan. The Emperor was little more than a figurehead, holding no real administrative power.

In 1331, Emperor Go-Daigo plotted to seize power and overthrow the shogunate in Kamakura. However, he was betrayed by a trusted adviser Fujiwara Sadafusa. The Emperor fled Kyoto with the Sacred Treasures and sought refuge in a secluded monastery overlooking the Kizu River, called Kasagi. The monastery was attacked by Bakufu troops in the Siege of Kasagi. The emperor managed to escape, but only temporarily, and was subsequently banished to the Oki Islands. The shogunate then enthroned Emperor Kgon.

The Emperor's son Prince Morinaga continued to fight, leading his father's supporters alongside Kusunoki Masashige.

Emperor Go-Daigo escaped Oki in the spring of 1333, two years after his exile, with the help of Nawa Nagatoshi and his family, raising an army at Funagami Mountain in Hoki Province

Meanwhile, Ashikaga Takauji, the chief general of the Hojo family, turned against the Hojo and fought for the Emperor in the hopes of being named shogun. Takauji entered Kyoto on 19 June and Go-Daigo entered the Palace at the end of July 1333. Simultaneously, Nitta Yoshisada led his army on a campaign through Kozuke and Musashi provinces culminating in the siege of Kamakura, setting fire to the city, and destroying the Kamakura shogunate Blade length tsuba to tip 31 inches overall length sword 41 inches and overall 41.5 inches in saya.
To qualify as an Odachi, the sword in question would have a blade length of around 3 shaku (90.9 centimetres (35.8 in]; however, as with most terms in Japanese sword arts, there is no exact definition of the size of an Odachi. Apart from the blade polish this sword has been untouched for likely 250 years. Almost 700 years old. Double hi to the very long blade, o-sukashi Koto period iron tsuba and fushi kashira superbly decorated with takebori insects. The Genko War (1331–1333) also known as the Genko Incident was a civil war in Japan which marked the fall of the Kamakura shogunate and end of the power of the Hojo clan. The war thus preceded the Nanboku-cho period and the rise of the Ashikaga shogunate. Genko is the name of the Japanese era corresponding to the period 1331–1334.

Throughout much of the Kamakura period, the shogunate was controlled by the Hojo clan, whose members held the title of shikken (regent for the shogun), and passed it on within the clan. The Emperor was little more than a figurehead, holding no real administrative power.

In 1331, Emperor Go-Daigo plotted to seize power and overthrow the shogunate in Kamakura. However, he was betrayed by a trusted adviser Fujiwara Sadafusa. The Emperor fled Kyoto with the Sacred Treasures and sought refuge in a secluded monastery overlooking the Kizu River, called Kasagi. The monastery was attacked by Bakufu troops in the Siege of Kasagi. The emperor managed to escape, but only temporarily, and was subsequently banished to the Oki Islands. The shogunate then enthroned Emperor Kgon.

The Emperor's son Prince Morinaga continued to fight, leading his father's supporters alongside Kusunoki Masashige.

Emperor Go-Daigo escaped Oki in the spring of 1333, two years after his exile, with the help of Nawa Nagatoshi and his family, raising an army at Funagami Mountain in Hoki Province

Meanwhile, Ashikaga Takauji, the chief general of the Hojo family, turned against the Hojo and fought for the Emperor in the hopes of being named shogun. Takauji entered Kyoto on 19 June and Go-Daigo entered the Palace at the end of July 1333. Simultaneously, Nitta Yoshisada led his army on a campaign through Kozuke and Musashi provinces culminating in the siege of Kamakura, setting fire to the city, and destroying the Kamakura shogunate Blade length tsuba to tip 31 inches overall length sword 41 inches and overall 41.5 inches in saya. Over the centuries this sword was shortened at the tang [by official Japanese edict] by around 5 inches, thus you can see the five mekugi ana in the nakago for the blade's remounting. The Shogunal government set a law which prohibited holding swords above a set length (in 1617, 1626, and 1645)

Code: 22244Price: 7950.00 GBP


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A Good Original 'Desert Rat' British WW2 British Infantry 4 Medal Group
From a former Desert Rat veteran of the 8th Army. Acquired with his helmet but sold seperately. He fought Rommel's Afrika Korps, [who, under Montgomery's command, kicked the DAK's bottoms at El Alamein] and then with the 8th Army transferred to Italy in order to fight from the south right through to Rome, however, the owner of this medal group and helmet was severely wounded before he qualified for the Italy Star medal, however, he did get the Afrika Star with 8th Army bar, plus his other 3 medals. The Eighth Army was a field army formation of the British Army during the Second World War, fighting in the North African and Italian campaigns. Units came from Australia, British India, Canada, Free French Forces, Greece, New Zealand, Poland, Rhodesia, South Africa and the United Kingdom.

Significant formations which passed through the Army included V Corps, X Corps, XIII Corps, XXX Corps, I Canadian Corps and the II Polish Corps. On 26 November the Commander-in-Chief Middle East Command, General Sir Claude Auchinleck, replaced Cunningham with Major-General Neil Ritchie, following disagreements between Auchinleck and Cunningham. Despite achieving a number of tactical successes, Rommel was forced to concede Tobruk and was pushed back to El Agheila by the end of 1941. In February 1942 Rommel had regrouped his forces sufficiently to push the over-extended Eighth Army back to the Gazala line, just west of Tobruk. Both sides commenced a period of building their strength to launch new offensives but it was Rommel who took the initiative first, forcing the Eighth Army from the Gazala position.

Ritchie proved unable to halt Rommel and was replaced when Auchinleck himself took direct command of the army. The Panzer Army Afrika were eventually stopped by Auchinleck at the First Battle of El Alamein. Auchinleck, wishing to pause and regroup the Eighth Army, which had expended a lot of its strength in halting Rommel, came under intense political pressure from British Prime Minister Winston Churchill to strike back immediately. However, he proved unable to build on his success at Alamein and was replaced as Commander-in-Chief Middle-East in August 1942 by General Harold Alexander and as Eighth Army commander by Lieutenant-General William Gott. Gott was killed in an air crash on his way to take up his command and so Lieutenant-General Bernard Montgomery was appointed in his place. Alexander and Montgomery were able to resist the pressure from Churchill, building the Army's strength and adding a pursuit formation, X Corps, to the Army's XIII and XXX Corps.

At the beginning of November 1942 the Eighth Army defeated Rommel in the decisive Second Battle of El Alamein, pursuing the defeated Axis army across Libya and reaching the Mareth defensive line on the Tunisian border in February 1943, where it came under the control of 18th Army Group. The Eighth Army outflanked the Mareth defences in March 1943 and after further fighting alongside the British First Army, the other 18th Army Group component which had been campaigning in Tunisia since November 1942, the Axis forces in North Africa surrendered in May 1943

Code: 22243Price: 175.00 GBP


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A Good Original 'Desert Rat' British WW2 British Infantry 'Brodie' Helmet
Complete with original liner and chinstrap intact. Maker stamp and issue date 1942. Acquired with his 4 medal group, but sold seperately. From a former Desert Rat veteran of the 8th Army that fought Rommel's Afrika Korps, [who, under Montgomery's command, kicked the DAK's bottoms at El Alamein] then the 8th Army transferred to Italy to fight from the south right through to Rome, however the owner of this helmet was severely wounded before he qualified for the Italy Star medal, but he did get the Afrika Star with 8th Army bar plus his other 3 medals. The Eighth Army was a field army formation of the British Army during the Second World War, fighting in the North African and Italian campaigns. Units came from Australia, British India, Canada, Free French Forces, Greece, New Zealand, Poland, Rhodesia, South Africa and the United Kingdom.

Significant formations which passed through the Army included V Corps, X Corps, XIII Corps, XXX Corps, I Canadian Corps and the II Polish Corps. On 26 November the Commander-in-Chief Middle East Command, General Sir Claude Auchinleck, replaced Cunningham with Major-General Neil Ritchie, following disagreements between Auchinleck and Cunningham. Despite achieving a number of tactical successes, Rommel was forced to concede Tobruk and was pushed back to El Agheila by the end of 1941. In February 1942 Rommel had regrouped his forces sufficiently to push the over-extended Eighth Army back to the Gazala line, just west of Tobruk. Both sides commenced a period of building their strength to launch new offensives but it was Rommel who took the initiative first, forcing the Eighth Army from the Gazala position.

Ritchie proved unable to halt Rommel and was replaced when Auchinleck himself took direct command of the army. The Panzer Army Afrika were eventually stopped by Auchinleck at the First Battle of El Alamein. Auchinleck, wishing to pause and regroup the Eighth Army, which had expended a lot of its strength in halting Rommel, came under intense political pressure from British Prime Minister Winston Churchill to strike back immediately. However, he proved unable to build on his success at Alamein and was replaced as Commander-in-Chief Middle-East in August 1942 by General Harold Alexander and as Eighth Army commander by Lieutenant-General William Gott. Gott was killed in an air crash on his way to take up his command and so Lieutenant-General Bernard Montgomery was appointed in his place. Alexander and Montgomery were able to resist the pressure from Churchill, building the Army's strength and adding a pursuit formation, X Corps, to the Army's XIII and XXX Corps.

At the beginning of November 1942 the Eighth Army defeated Rommel in the decisive Second Battle of El Alamein, pursuing the defeated Axis army across Libya and reaching the Mareth defensive line on the Tunisian border in February 1943, where it came under the control of 18th Army Group. The Eighth Army outflanked the Mareth defences in March 1943 and after further fighting alongside the British First Army, the other 18th Army Group component which had been campaigning in Tunisia since November 1942, the Axis forces in North Africa surrendered in May 1943 Helmet in good condition overall with surface russetting.

Code: 22241Price: 275.00 GBP


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A Very Fine Pair of Cased WW1 Great War Imperial German Epaulettes
For the Imperial German 40th Infantry officer. Used by the German regimental officers that fought in the trenches with Adolf Hitler's infantry, and apparently the 40th relieved Hitler's company within the List Regiment, the Bavarian Reserve Infantry Regiment 16 (1st Company of the List Regiment). In their original storage case in mint condition overall. Mid blue cloth background with gilt crescent and Infantry number 40. Red back cloth. During the war, Hitler served in France and Belgium in the Bavarian Reserve Infantry Regiment 16 (1st Company of the List Regiment). He was an infantryman in the 1st Company during the First Battle of Ypres (October 1914), which Germans remember as the Kindermord bei Ypern (Ypres Massacre of the Innocents) because approximately 40,000 men (between a third and a half) of nine newly-enlisted infantry divisions became casualties in 20 days. Hitler's regiment entered the battle with 3,600 men and at its end mustered 611. By December Hitler's own company of 250 was reduced to 42. Biographer John Keegan claims that this experience drove Hitler to become aloof and withdrawn for the remaining years of war. After the battle, Hitler was promoted from Schütze (Private) to Gefreiter (Lance Corporal). He was assigned to be a regimental message-runner The List Regiment fought in many battles, including the First Battle of Ypres (1914), the Battle of the Somme (1916), the Battle of Arras (1917), and the Battle of Passchendaele (1917). During the Battle of Fromelles on 19–20 July 1916 the Australians, mounting their first attack in France, assaulted the Bavarian positions. The Bavarians repulsed the attackers, suffering the second-highest losses they had on any day on the Western Front, about 7,000 men

Code: 22240Price: 375.00 GBP


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A Scarce 19th Century Antique Crimean War Period British Boot Knife
Ebonised wooden handle steel crossguard and double sided steel blade. A close combat knife used by officers in the Crimean war but outside of military campaigns could be referred to as a gamblers knife. A boot knife or a gambler's dagger is a small fixed-blade knife (usually, a dagger) that is designed to be carried in or on a boot. Typically, such a knife is worn on a belt or under a pant leg. If worn around the neck (by means of a chain or lanyard) they become a neck knife. Boot knives generally come with a sheath, but not always. Most have double-edged blades, that range from 3 to 5 inches long. This boot knife is 7.25 inches long overall and has a 3.5 inch blade

Code: 22237Price: 225.00 GBP


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A Victorian, Stilleto Style, So-Called Prostitute’s Dagger
With very attractive pressed ivorine handle [made to simulate ivory]. By F Ward & Co. Cutlery, Sheffield, the blade is titled 'B 4*Any'. A prostitutes dagger was so called due to their attractiveness and useful size for concealment by unaccompanied ladies abroad after dark. Of course they would never have been sold as such by retailers, and the term has entered the vernacular of collectors probably even after the time they were actually made, however, like the term 'mortuary hilted swords' [that bore the engraved visage of the king in the hilt] from the English Civil War, they were never actually called that until almost 200 years later. They are attratively designed elegant daggers, just such as this one, with a slender and most efficient blade. Prostitution became a major concern and a focal point for social reformers in the 19th century. Concerns were seen everywhere including the literature of notables such as Charles Dickens. He created characters (some of which may have had real life versions) like Nancy in Oliver Twist, and Martha Endell in David Copperfield.

No one knows for certain, but there were somewhere between 8,000 and 80,000 prostitutes in London during the Victorian Age. It is generally accepted that most of these women found themselves in prostitution due to economic necessity.

There were three attitudes towards prostitution – condemnation, regulation, and reformation. Dickens adopted the last and was intimately involved in a house of reform called Urania Cottage. No scabbard Blade 4.5 inches, overall 7.5 inches long

Code: 22235Price: 275.00 GBP


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A Fine Antique 19th Century Indo Persian All Steel Kindjal Short Sword
Also known in the Caucasus and Russia as the Khanjali. Deeply chisseled decoration, blade with armour piercing tip. Traces of gold in the cartouch panels. A khanjali or kinzhal when transliterating the Russian is a double-edged dagger often with a single off-set groove on each face of the blade. The shape of the weapon is similar to the ancient Greek Xiphos, the Roman Gladius, or the Scottish dirk; and has been used as a secondary weapon in Georgia and the Caucasus since ancient times.

Such daggers and their scabbards are usually highly engraved in gold or silver designs, and sometimes include embedded gemstones. The scabbard will generally feature a ball point extension on the tip, and the handle is usually made of materials such as wood or ivory.

Although part of the national Georgian men's traditional costume, the Circassian and Kuban Cossacks, among others, also wear this weapon – see burka (Caucasus). The Circassian dagger is known as the adigha gkama.

The Russian poets Alexander Pushkin and Mikhail Lermontov both addressed celebrated poems to this weapon. No scabbard, 17.75 inches long overall

Code: 22234Price: 395.00 GBP


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A Viking Axe Head Around 1100 Years Old.
Viking Axehead 9th-12th century AD. An iron axehead with triangular socket, narrow blade with curved edge with beard section. The beard could be used as a hook to aid the climbing of buildings or forts.
One of the most famous Viking axes is “Hel” (named after the Norse death goddess), which belonged to King Magnus of Norway and Denmark. He is said to have inherited the weapon from his father, Olav Haraldsson of Norway, whose ax features prominently in Norway’s national coat of arms. Some Viking axes – if they were wielded by a particularly strong and skilled warrior – could even cut through chainmail and helmets. When King Magnus’s poet credited the king with being able to split heads like firewood, he wasn’t necessarily being hyperbolic. Writing about the pre-Viking Franks and their use of throwing axes, the Francisca, Procopius makes it clear that the Franks threw their axes immediately before hand to hand combat with the purpose of breaking shields and disrupting the enemy line while possibly wounding or killing an enemy warrior. The weight of the head and length of the haft would allow the axe to be thrown with considerable momentum to an effective range of about 12 m (40 ft). Even if the edge of the blade were not to strike the target, the weight of the iron head could cause injury. The francisca also had a psychological effect, in that, on the throwing of the francisca, the enemy might turn and run in the fear that another volley was coming. It is most logical that the Vikings may well have adopted this system of axe throwing combat from the earlier Franks, as it seemed most effective in numerous combat arenas. 6 3/4 inches across

Code: 22232Price: 785.00 GBP

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