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NOW SOLD A Beautiful Ancient Bronze Age Long Sword Circa 1200 to 800 BC

The late bronze age early Luristan culture was renowned for their bronze workmanship and this cast bronze sword is an excellent illustration of their skill. Cast using the lost wax process, this sword is a rare example of the double ear pommel type found in the great museums of the world.

This well-balanced and mighty weapon, is around the same proportions of the much later Roman gladius. It features a slender square hilt that joins to a pommel that divides at right angles to the blade into two finely decorated semi-circular "ears". The pommel features with a semi-circular opening in the centre of each ear. A rectangular guard carefully designed that extends down to firmly grip the upper end of the double-edged blade.
The wide graduated blade that tapers regularly to a point and it has, low, twin central midribs that taper regularly with almost straight cutting edge to a point, making it most suitable for thrusting and cutting.
It is the austere perfection of line and proportion that makes this weapon so beautiful. For reference see: Moorey P.R.S. "Catalogue of Ancient Persian Bronzes in the Ashmolean Museum" (1971), pg. 80 fig 63, Mahboubian, H. "Art of Ancient Iran" pg 304 386(a) & (b) and pg 314-315 397a-I, Moorey PRS "Ancient Persian Bronzes in the Adam Collection" pg 58 28 and Muscarella "Bronze and Iron, Ancient Near Eastern Artifacts in the Metropolitan Museum of Art" pgs 282-285 385-390.

This type of pommel represents the north-western Persian version of weapons evolved from Elamite or Mesopotamian flange-hilted blades. They are found made throughout the northern regions of Persia in both bronze and iron, and sometimes with a combination of bronze hilt and iron blade. Items such as this were oft acquired in the 18th century by British noblemen touring Northern France and Italy on their Grand Tour. Originally placed on display in the family 'cabinet of curiosities', within his country house upon his return home. A popular pastime in the 18th and 19th century, comprised of English ladies and gentlemen traveling for many months, or even years, througout classical Europe, and Middle East, acquiring antiquities and antiques for their private collections. This is a most handsome ancient bronze weapon from the era of the so called Trojan Wars. The ancient Greeks believed the Trojan War was a historical event that had taken place in the 13th or 12th century BC, and believed that Troy was located in modern day Turkey near the Dardanelles. In Greek mythology, the Trojan War was waged against the city of Troy by the Achaeans (Greeks) after Paris of Troy took Helen from her husband Menelaus, the king of Sparta. The war is among the most important events in Greek mythology and was narrated in many works of Greek literature, including Homer's Iliad and the Odyssey . "The Iliad" relates a part of the last year of the siege of Troy, while the Odyssey describes the journey home of Odysseus, one of the Achaean leaders. Other parts of the war were told in a cycle of epic poems, which has only survived in fragments. Episodes from the war provided material for Greek tragedy and other works of Greek literature, and for Roman poets such as Virgil and Ovid.

The war originated from a quarrel between the goddesses Athena, Hera, and Aphrodite, after Eris, the goddess of strife and discord, gave them a golden apple, sometimes known as the Apple of Discord, marked "for the fairest". Zeus sent the goddesses to Paris, who judged that Aphrodite, as the "fairest", should receive the apple. In exchange, Aphrodite made Helen, the most beautiful of all women and wife of Menelaus, fall in love with Paris, who took her to Troy. Agamemnon, king of Mycenae and the brother of Helen's husband Menelaus, led an expedition of Achaean troops to Troy and besieged the city for ten years due to Paris' insult. After the deaths of many heroes, including the Achaeans Achilles and Ajax, and the Trojans Hector and Paris, the city fell to the ruse of the Trojan Horse. The Achaeans slaughtered the Trojans (except for some of the women and children whom they kept or sold as slaves) and desecrated the temples, thus earning the gods' wrath. Few of the Achaeans returned safely to their homes and many founded colonies in distant shores. The Romans later traced their origin to Aeneas, one of the Trojans, who was said to have led the surviving Trojans to modern day Italy. Made in copper bronze in the Western Asiatic region. Western Asiatic bronzes refer to items dating from roughly 1200-800 BC that have been excavated since the late 1920's in the Harsin, Khorramabad and Alishtar valleys of the Zagros Mountains especially at the site of Tepe Sialk. Scholars believe they were created by either the Cimmerians or by such related Indo-European peoples as the early Medes and Persians. Weapons from this region were highly sought after by warriors of many cultures because of their quality, balance and durability. Weighs 1,6 kilos, 79 cms long

Code: 23448

3450.00 GBP

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NOW SOLD A Superb Antique Original Pacific Islands 'Pirate Cutlass', Carved Sea Beast Pommel HIlt

It seems one couldn't find a sword, more defined and categorised as an iconic pirate cutlass, if one tried. Part of its decor includes a sea beast, crashing waves with sea spray, a parrot's head, a clam shell guard, and a stylised cannon ball. It simply couldn't be more iconic, a cliche pirate cutlass example, yet, it is a superb, original, antique cutlass, that has undoubtedly seen combat service, yet survived very well. With its wide, twin fullered crescent blade, engraved with a decorative repeating wave and sea spray pattern. It has a steel single knuckle bow with cannon ball design, a stylised parrot's head quillon, and a clamshell shaped guard. Carved hardwood hilt with sea beast head pommel. Heavy leather scabbard with stamped patterning and an iron reinforced chape. Likely made in the Philippine Islands, and we show in the gallery a photo of four somewhat similar, 17th and 18th century variants of the same type of Philippino cutlasses in the Royal Ontario Museum collection. Another photo of a similar shell guard cutlass with stag hilt [but plain pommel] recovered covered in barnacles and xrayed, from a French Privateer La Dauphine, recovered off St Malo, the ship was lost in 1804. Although likely made in the Philippine Islands they were traded throughout the region with Corsairs and Barbary pirates of all persuasions. This super cutlass has just returned from 3 full days in the workshop being sympathetically hand cleaned and conserved, no restoration required at all fortunately, just cleaning. The north-west Pacific coastline of North America can be described as a double-edged sword of wild rugged desolate coastline that contrasts the serene security of blissful bays and protected island hideaways. The landscape is anchored by a protected inside passage.

Despite all the beauty and ruggedness of the Pacific Northwest, it is the descriptions of the tropical paradises of the Caribbean Islands and the South Pacific that are made popular and romanticised in modern culture through pirate novels, images and movies. These images and descriptions have become the defacto stereotype of a pirate's "paradise". These "paradises" have been further embellished through classic tales of adventure from such authors as Robert Louis Stevenson, Howard Pyle, Joseph Conrad, and Daniel Defoe. The Golden Age of Piracy is a common designation for the period between the 1650s and the 1730s, when maritime piracy was a significant factor in the histories of the Caribbean, the United Kingdom, the Indian Ocean, North America, and West Africa.

Histories of piracy often subdivide the Golden Age of Piracy into three periods:

The buccaneering period (approximately 1650 to 1680), characterised by Anglo-French seamen based in Jamaica and Tortuga attacking Spanish colonies, and shipping in the Caribbean and eastern Pacific.
The Pirate Round (1690s), associated with long-distance voyages from the Americas to rob Muslim and East India Company targets in the Indian Ocean and Red Sea.
The post-Spanish Succession period (1715 to 1726), when Anglo-American sailors and privateers left unemployed by the end of the War of the Spanish Succession turned en masse to piracy in the Caribbean, the Indian Ocean, the North American eastern seaboard, and the West African coast. Overall inches long in scabbard 27.3/4 inches, blade 20 1/2 inches long. The blade in the scabbard stops around 1 inch from the guard, and its belt loop is part detached.

Code: 23680

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NOW SOLD A Spectacular & Exceptionally Beautiful 19th Century Pacific Islander's Bolo Sword, Ingolot Headhunters Sword

A high ranking and very superior quality example of these beautiful swords from the South Seas Islanders/Pacific. A sword with very beautiful tortoishell covered scabbard, and a long finely made blade with a flat side and a chamfered edged side, and carved native wood hilt of a stylised head of a bird god. Headhunting among the Ilongots of Northern Luzon, Philippines, was not an unchanging ancient custom, but a cultural practice that has shifted dramatically over the course of the past century. Headhunting stopped, resumed, and stopped again; its victims at various periods were fellow Ilongots, Japanese soldiers, and lowland Christian Filipinos; it took place as surprise attack, planned vendetta, or distant raid against strangers. Sometimes called a visayan sword. overall 28.5 inches long in the scabbard the blade is 21.25 inches long, 2 inches across at the widest, and the scabbard is almost 3 inches across. Hilt 6.75 inches long

Code: 23669

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NOW SOLD A 'Tower of London' Brown Bess Musket, Napoleonic Wars Period Early India Pattern' & Bayonet

Probably the most famous military flintlock musket in the world today, and certainly one of the most historically important and desirable long guns of its type from the Napoleonic wars.

A typical Napoleonic Wars regiment of the line issue musket, Crown GR and Tower swan neck cock lock with government inspectors stamps, regulation brass mounts, iron ramrod, sling swivels and triangular socket bayonet stamped EX by G Salter & Co. This may be a mark for the Essex regiment, the 44th foot. Walnut stock with usual signs of combat use bruising etc as one can expect.The Brown Bess musket began its life almost 300 years ago, and it helped in creating one of the greatest trading empires the world has ever seen and, among other achievements, made the 'British Square' the almost undefeated form of infantry defence throughout the world. Made in four distinct patterns it originally started life as a 46 inch barrel musket called the Long Land or Ist pattern [Brown Bess]. Then in around 1768 the gun evolved and the barrel was shortened to 42 inches [as 46 was deemed unwieldy] and renamed the Short Land or 2nd pattern. Although the Long Land was made continually for another 20 years. With the onset of the Napoleonic Wars in the 1790s, the British Board of Ordnance found itself woefully short of the 250,000 muskets it would need to equip its forces. It managed to produce around 20,000 short land pattern muskets but this was simply not sufficient. At that time the British East India Company maintained it own troops and had contracted with makers to produce a simplified version of the Brown Bess musket with a 39-inch barrel and less ornate furniture and stock work. It was generally felt that the standard of these "India pattern" muskets was not up to the standard of the earlier Besses, but necessity required action so the authorities convinced Company officials to turn over their stores to the Crown. By 1797 the urgencies of war ultimately created the demise of the Short Pattern, and all manufacture was turned to building the more simple 'India' pattern. For the most part, the gun underwent few changes from its introduction until Waterloo, with the exception of the cock, which was altered from the traditional swan-neck style to a sturdier, reinforced version in around 1809. Barrel 39inch overall 54.75 inches long. Action has a very good and strong mainspring, sear spring is not holding. As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables

Code: 23466

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NOW SOLD What A Corker!! A Very Good indeed 1907 Pattern Royal Marines Regimentally Marked .303 SMLE Mk3 Rifle Sword Bayonet

One of 25 mixed bayonets we bought today. Used by the Royal Marines [probably the best marine service combat soldiers in the world] throughout WW1 and into WW2. Although it has obviously signs of combat use, this is an absolute beauty, and you may never see another regimental marked, combat use, Royal Marines bayonet as good again. Bearing in mind, compared to the British Army and Navy, the Royal Marines was a relatively small force of 55.000 compared to 3,820,000 in the Army. During the First World War, in addition to their usual stations aboard ship, Royal Marines were part of the Royal Naval Division which landed in Belgium in 1914 to help defend Antwerp and later took part in the amphibious landing at Gallipoli in 1915. It also served on the Western Front. The division's first two commanders were Royal Marine Artillery Generals. Other Royal Marines acted as landing parties in the naval campaign against the Turkish fortifications in the Dardanelles before the Gallipoli landing. They were sent ashore to assess damage to Turkish fortifications after bombardment by British and French ships and, if necessary, to complete their destruction. The Royal Marines were the last to leave Gallipoli, replacing both British and French troops in a neatly planned and executed withdrawal from the beaches.

The Royal Marines also took part in the Zeebrugge Raid in 1918. Five Royal Marines earned the Victoria Cross in the First World War, two at Zeebrugge, one at Gallipoli, one at Jutland and one on the Western Front. After the war Royal Marines took part in the allied intervention in Russia. In 1919During the Second World War, a small party of Royal Marines were first ashore at Namsos in April 1940, seizing the approaches to the Norwegian town preparatory to a landing by the British Army two days later. The Royal Marines formed the Royal Marines Division as an amphibiously trained division, parts of which served at Dakar and in the capture of Madagascar. After the assault on the French naval base at Antsirane in Madagascar was held up, fifty Sea Service Royal Marines from HMS Ramilles commanded by Captain Martin Price were landed on the quay of the base by the British destroyer HMS Anthony after it ran the gauntlet of French shore batteries defending Diego Suarez Bay. They then captured two of the batteries, which led to a quick surrender by the French

Code: 23665

270.00 GBP

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NOW SOLD A King George VIth Parachute Regt. Swagger Stick

Used from WW2 up to 1953. One of the great and legendary regiments of the world. Good ball top in nickel with embossed symbol of the winged parachute the Paras with lion atop the King's Crown. With black lacquered stick.The Parachute Regiment, colloquially known as the Paras, is an airborne infantry regiment of the British Army. The first battalion is part of the operational command of the Director Special Forces. The other battalions are the parachute infantry component of the British Army's rapid response formation, 16 Air Assault Brigade. The Paras, along with the Guards, are the only line infantry regiment of the British Army that has not been amalgamated with another unit since the end of the Second World War.

The Parachute Regiment was formed on 22 June 1940 during the Second World War and eventually raised 17 battalions. In Europe, these battalions formed part of the 1st Airborne Division, the 6th Airborne Division and the 2nd Independent Parachute Brigade Group. Another three battalions served with the British Indian Army in India and Burma. The regiment took part in six major parachute assault operations in North Africa, Italy, Greece, France, the Netherlands and Germany, often landing ahead of all other troops.

At the end of the Second World War, the regiment was reduced to three regular army battalions first assigned to the 16th Parachute Brigade and later the 5th Airborne Brigade. The reserve 16th Airborne Division was formed using the regiment reserve battalions in the Territorial Army. Defence cuts gradually reduced the TA formations to a parachute brigade and then a single reserve battalion. In the same time period, the regular army battalions have taken part in operations in Suez, Cyprus, Borneo, Aden, Northern Ireland, the Falklands, the Kosovo War, the Balkans, Sierra Leone, Iraq and Afghanistan, at times being reinforced by men from the reserve battalion. In the British Army before World War I, swagger sticks were carried by all other ranks when off duty, as part of their walking out uniform. The stick took the form of a short cane of polished wood, with an ornamented metal head of regimental pattern. The usual custom was for the private soldier or NCO to carry the stick tucked under his arm. Cavalrymen carried a small riding cane instead of the swagger stick of infantry and other branches. This practice was restricted to the army and Royal Marines, and was never imitated by the other services, although T. E. Lawrence when he had enlisted in the Royal Air Force under the name of Ross, mentions that airmen under training at the RAF Depot at Uxbridge carried swagger sticks. It is thought that this practice was limited to the depot.

Until 1939 swagger sticks were still carried by peacetime regular soldiers when "walking out" of barracks, but the practice ceased with the outbreak of World War II. Uniforms are no longer worn by British army personnel when off-duty, and the swagger stick has accordingly become obsolete.

In the British Army and other military forces following the Commonwealth traditions, commissioned officers of most infantry regiments formerly carried swagger sticks (described as canes) when on duty, whilst warrant officers and senior NCOs carried pace sticks instead. This practice continues in some regiments, especially by warrant officers when in Barrack Dress. Cavalry officers would often carry a riding crop rather than a swagger stick, in deference to their mounted traditions. In some Irish regiments in the British army, such as the Royal Irish Regiment (1992), officers carried a blackthorn walking stick, based on the shillelagh. In the Royal Tank Regiment, officers carried an 'ash plant' or walking stick instead, in reference to World War I tank attacks, when officers would prepare lines of advance by testing the ground's firmness and suitability for tanks

Code: 23663

135.00 GBP

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🌟 Every Customer Should Expect & Will Receive Our World Renown 5* Star Service, Day In, Day Out, 365 Days of the Year🌟

We once again personally receive, every single day since we re-opened after lockdown was rescinded in April, the greatest honour of being described by almost every single visitor to our store, that we are the very best and most remarkable specialist shop they have ever seen or visited in the country.

We are consistently told there is no other shop in all of Europe to rival us. Our standards of personal service, honed through past generations for over 100 years, we trust, are second to none, and every possible effort is made to create the best possible atmosphere and assistance, for every single customer and visitor, whether they are seeking a single book or even an entire library. Without question we are not the largest shop in Europe, that we could never be, but, we constantly strive to achieve what we can be, ..the best.

We were once advised by a much respected late client, Mr Garry Weston [owner of Fortnum & Mason of London] over 40 years ago, that like his famed and world respected store, ‘always strive for the epitome of Gestalt as a shopkeeper. With that aim you will always succeed.’

No stone is left unturned in order to ensure every single customer’s buying or selling experience is a pleasure and a joy. Thankfully, hundreds of you confirm this to us every single day, and for that we cannot thank you enough. Stay Healthy, Stay Safe.

Code: 23657

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NOW SOLD !!! A VERY SPECIAL BANK HOLIDAY OFFER!! A 500 Year Old Samurai Sword Signed Bishu Shimohara Terushige

OFFERED AT BELOW COST!
This super historical sword arrived this week with around 25 other, wonderful, original and ancient samurai edged weapons from a six figure collection we acquired last year and only managed to collect this week after lock down but, as is usual, we have chosen a fabulous sword from the collection and now duly offer it to our regulars, at below cost, as a big thank you!. This is a super, signed, ancient samurai sword, around 500 years old, that has lain totally untouched for around 200 years. We would normally put it through our specialist restoration system, for the attention of our Japanese trained artisans, but we have chosen to pass it on as a very special thank you. It could be acquired by its next owner as either a fabulous historical piece of samurai warfare history, or, as a long or short term restoration project, Potentially Saving Thousands of Pounds!!. the hilt is very good bearing a rare naturalistic design combed lacquer finish that was never traditionally bound in silk as other katana usually are. It has a superb pair of menuki of a samurai bowman's armour, a bow and arrows, in pure gold and shakudo. A superb iron early sukashi tsuba of plant leaves, and a nice pair of shibui iron fushigashira. Its original Edo lacquer saya though is quite tired slightly split and bruised, but if required we can have it superbly traditionally re-lacquered in a couple of weeks also at cost. The blade is very grey and can be left as is, or expertly stone re-polished sometime in the future. This sword is an absolute beauty, even as battle worn as it is. Bearing in mind all surviving 500 year old European swords now look far worse than this does, but if it was sympathetically restored it would look truly amazing, plus, it bears a really good master sword smith's name, of Terushige of bishu Province. In very achievable better condition this would be a sword we could easily sell for up to £8000. Offered as an immediate outright sale only. Complete with one of our fine katanakake display stands with our compliments.

Code: 23654

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NOW SOLD A Most Attractive Original Antique Meiji Period Decorative Arts Daisho of Carved Samurai Swords

A very decorative original antique japanese display set, depicting the samurai daisho of old. Meiji period, late`19th century. Carved bone mountings [called koshirae], with carved figures of Japanese sages and samurai. Made in the late Meiji to Taisho period as a most decorative and attractive samurai style set of sword fittings, with a single cutlers blade in the long sword, and without any blade fitted in the short sword. Of course this was not a traditional sword mounting for conflict, but when Japan was opening up to the world, after being a closed feudal society for almost 400 years, and the wearing of the samurai sword was forbidden in public, samurai swords and dagger fittings, such as these, were made especially for the early visitors from Europe, that arrived from the early steamship trade that started in Victorian England, through companies such as Thomas Cook & Co. The daisho is a Japanese term referring to the traditional weapons of the samurai. The daisho is composed of the katana [daito] and the wakizashi [shoto]. The daito, meaning big sword, and shoto, meaning small sword. The katana, the longer of the two swords, was typically employed in man-to-man combat. The wakizashi was the highly effective main-gauche or close-combat weapon, ideal for use within the confines of castle or building. A daisho allows for defense while fighting, or, the fighting of two enemies at once. Also, the daisho allows the combatant to have a longer or more widespread fighting range. Both of the sword mounts have old small repairs and damage. Total lengths, daito 35.25 inches long, shoto 28 inches long.Complete, including daisho stand. only one blade.

Code: 23613

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A Most Scarce Early Blueprint of a Professor Kurt Wiesinger Zeppelin Luftschiff

With the schematics of length, weight, load capacity, etc. Scale 1:250. Professor Wiesinger design both an airship and a revolutionary Zeppelin train. The coming to power of the Nazi Party in 1933 had important consequences for Zeppelin Luftschiffbau. Zeppelins became a propaganda tool for the new regime: they would now display the Nazi swastika on their fins and occasionally tour Germany to play march music and propaganda speeches to the people. In 1934 Joseph Goebbels, the Minister of Propaganda, contributed two million reichsmarks towards the construction of LZ 129 and in 1935 Hermann Göring established a new airline directed by Ernst Lehmann, the Deutsche Zeppelin Reederei, as a subsidiary of Lufthansa to take over Zeppelin operations. Hugo Eckener was an outspoken anti-Nazi: complaints about the use of Zeppelins for propaganda purposes in 1936 led Goebbels to declare "Dr. Eckener has placed himself outside the pale of society. Henceforth his name is not to be mentioned in the newspapers and his photograph is not to be published"

On 4 March 1936 LZ 129 Hindenburg (named after former President of Germany, Paul von Hindenburg) made its first flight. The Hindenburg was the largest airship ever built. It had been designed to use non-flammable helium, but the only supplies of the gas were controlled by the United States, which refused to allow its export. So, in what proved to be a fatal decision, the Hindenburg was filled with flammable hydrogen. Apart from the propaganda missions, LZ 129 was used on the transatlantic service alongside Graf Zeppelin.
On 6 May 1937, while landing in Lakehurst after a transatlantic flight, the tail of the ship caught fire, and within seconds, the Hindenburg burst into flames, killing 35 of the 97 people on board and 1 member of the ground crew. The cause of the fire has not been definitively determined. The investigation into the accident concluded that static electricity had ignited hydrogen which had leaked from the gasbags, although there were allegations of sabotage. 13 passengers and 22 crew, including Ernst Lehmann, were killed.

Despite the apparent danger, there remained a list of 400 people who still wanted to fly as Zeppelin passengers and had paid for the trip. Their money was refunded in 1940.Not to be confused with the oft seen 1970's Zeppelin re-prints produced in Texas. Would look superb framed. Size; 89cm x 64cm

Code: 23621

275.00 GBP

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