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A Beautiful Original Roman 2nd century ad Modius or Fire Alter Status Ring.

A Beautiful Original Roman 2nd century ad Modius or Fire Alter Status Ring.

Henig type Xb. Wide oval bezel affixed to flattened shoulders engraved copper alloy. Almost identical to one found in the UK near Hadrian's Wall. Engraved to either to represent the Zaroastrian fire altar, or vessel of sprouting grains. the ring was important for displaying the Roman's status. For example Tiberius, who was after all left-handed according to Suetonius, thus displays a ring in his bronze portrait as the Pontifex Maximus: The complete Roman Empire had around a 60 million population and a census more perfect than many parts of the world (to collect taxes, of course) but identification was still quite difficult and aggravated even more because there were a maximum of 17 men names and the women received the name of the family in feminine and a number (Prima for First, Secunda for Second…). A lot of people had the same exact name.
So the Roman proved the citizenship by inscribing themselves (or the slaves when they freed them) in the census, usually accompanied with two witnesses. Roman inscribed in the census were citizens and used an iron or bronze ring to prove it. With Augustus, those that could prove a wealth of more than 400,000 sesterces were part of a privileged class called Equites (knights) that came from the original nobles that could afford a horse. The Equites were middle-high class and wore a bronze or gold ring to prove it, with the famous Angusticlavia (a tunic with an expensive red-purple twin line). Senators (those with a wealth of more than 1,000,000 sesterces) also used the gold ring and the Laticlave, a broad band of purple in the tunic.

So the rings were very important to tell from a glimpse of eye if a traveller was a citizen, an equites or a senator, or legionary. People sealed and signed letters with the rings and its falsification could bring death.
The fugitive slaves didn’t have rings but iron collars with texts like “If found, return me to X” which also helped to recognise them. The domesticus slaves (the ones that lived in houses) didn’t wore the collar but sometimes were marked. A ring discovered 50 years ago is now believed to possibly be the ring of Pontius Pilate himself, and it was the same copper-bronze form ring as is this one. Comes in a complimentary box

Code: 24366

345.00 GBP

Archived


A Very Good Large, Barbed, 'Deep Swallow Tail' Original English & Welsh Arrowhead of Agincourt

A Very Good Large, Barbed, 'Deep Swallow Tail' Original English & Welsh Arrowhead of Agincourt

Part of our wondrous, historical and original antiquities, Roman, Viking crusaders, and medeavil battlefield artefacts collection. Iron arrowhead of a tapering round-section socket, rectangular-section shaft, and the rare deep swallowtail type barbed head. Early 15th century, circa 1400. An absolute iconic original piece of British history. In battlefield recovered condition but very nice indeed. Approx. 3.5 inches long, 1.3 inches wide. Items such as this were oft acquired in the 18th century by British noblemen touring Northern France and Italy on their Grand Tour. Originally placed on display in the family 'cabinet of curiosities', within his country house upon his return home. A popular pastime in the 18th and 19th century, comprised of English ladies and gentlemen travelling for many months, or even years, throughout classical Europe, acquiring antiquities and antiques for their private collections.
The Battle of Agincourt was a major English victory in the Hundred Years' War. The battle took place on 25 October 1415 (Saint Crispin's Day) in the County of Saint-Pol, Artois, some 40 km south of Calais. Along with the battles of Crécy (1346) and Poitiers (1356), it was one of the most important English triumphs in the conflict. England's victory at Agincourt against a numerically superior French army crippled France, and started a new period in the war during which the English began enjoying great military successes.

After several decades of relative peace, the English had renewed their war effort in 1415 amid the failure of negotiations with the French. In the ensuing campaign, many soldiers perished due to disease and the English numbers dwindled, but as they tried to withdraw to English-held Calais they found their path blocked by a considerably larger French army. Despite the disadvantage, the following battle ended in an overwhelming tactical victory for the English.

King Henry V of England led his troops into battle and participated in hand-to-hand fighting. The French king of the time, Charles VI, did not command the French army himself, as he suffered from severe psychotic illnesses with moderate mental incapacitation. Instead, the French were commanded by Constable Charles d'Albret and various prominent French noblemen of the Armagnac party.

This battle is notable for the use of the English longbow in very large numbers, with the English and Welsh archers forming up to 80 percent of Henry's army. The decimation of the French cavalry at their hands is regarded as an indicator of the decline of cavalry and the beginning of the dominance of ranged weapons on the battlefield.

Agincourt is one of England's most celebrated victories. The battle is the centrepiece of the play Henry V by Shakespeare. Juliet Barker in her book Agincourt: The King, the Campaign, the Battle ( published in 2005) argues the English and Welsh were outnumbered "at least four to one and possibly as much as six to one". She suggests figures of about 6,000 for the English and 36,000 for the French, based on the Gesta Henrici's figures of 5,000 archers and 900 men-at-arms for the English, and Jean de Wavrin's statement "that the French were six times more numerous than the English". The 2009 Encyclopædia Britannica uses the figures of about 6,000 for the English and 20,000 to 30,000 for the French. Part of an original medieval collection we acquired, of antiquities and in particular early Anglo Welsh relics of warfare from ancient French battle sites recovered up to 220 years ago.


Richard Lassels, an expatriate Roman Catholic priest, first used the phrase “Grand Tour” in his 1670 book Voyage to Italy, published posthumously in Paris in 1670. In its introduction, Lassels listed four areas in which travel furnished "an accomplished, consummate traveler" with opportunities to experience first hand the intellectual, the social, the ethical, and the political life of the Continent.

The English gentry of the 17th century believed that what a person knew came from the physical stimuli to which he or she has been exposed. Thus, being on-site and seeing famous works of art and history was an all important part of the Grand Tour. So most Grand Tourists spent the majority of their time visiting museums and historic sites.

Once young men began embarking on these journeys, additional guidebooks and tour guides began to appear to meet the needs of the 20-something male and female travelers and their tutors traveling a standard European itinerary. They carried letters of reference and introduction with them as they departed from southern England, enabling them to access money and invitations along the way.

With nearly unlimited funds, aristocratic connections and months or years to roam, these wealthy young tourists commissioned paintings, perfected their language skills and mingled with the upper crust of the Continent.

The wealthy believed the primary value of the Grand Tour lay in the exposure both to classical antiquity and the Renaissance, and to the aristocratic and fashionably polite society of the European continent. In addition, it provided the only opportunity to view specific works of art, and possibly the only chance to hear certain music. A Grand Tour could last from several months to several years. The youthful Grand Tourists usually traveled in the company of a Cicerone, a knowledgeable guide or tutor.

The ‘Grand Tour’ era of classical acquisitions from history existed up to around the 1850’s, and extended around the whole of Europe, Egypt, the Ottoman Empire, and the Holy Land.

Code: 24361

345.00 GBP

Archived


Ancient Greek Hellenistic Seal Ring of Heracles Alexander the Great Period

Ancient Greek Hellenistic Seal Ring of Heracles Alexander the Great Period

Original artefact from the 4th century BC. A wonderful original ancient Greek copper bronze seal ring, engraved with the full body representation of the demi god Heracles, [Hercules] from the Alexandrian period, circa 330bc. Heracles was a divine hero in Greek mythology, the son of Zeus and Alcmene, foster son of Amphitryon. He was a great-grandson and half-brother (as they are both sired by the god Zeus) of Perseus. He was the greatest of the Greek heroes, a paragon of masculinity, the ancestor of royal clans who claimed to be Heracleidae, and a champion of the Olympian order against chthonic monsters. In Rome and the modern West, he is known as Hercules, with whom the later Roman emperors, in particular Commodus and Maximian, often identified themselves. The Romans adopted the Greek version of his life and works essentially unchanged, but added anecdotal detail of their own, some of it linking the hero with the geography of the Central Mediterranean. Details of his cult were adapted to Rome as well. Many popular stories were told of his life, the most famous being The Twelve Labours of Heracles; Alexandrian poets of the Hellenistic age drew his mythology into a high poetic and tragic atmosphere. His figure, which initially drew on Near Eastern motifs such as the lion-fight, was widely known. This vase at Caere shows King Eurytus of Oechalia and Heracles in a symposium. Alexander the Great in thirty two years of life, conquered and expanded the Persian Empire. Since he studied Greek philosopher's ideas about democracy, he allowed the people he conquered to rule themselves. He never lost a battle. There is a story about a black stallion that one day started running wildly through the courtyard. Five trainers chased it but were unable to mount it. All of a sudden the horse stopped short. Not a soul dared to approach except young Alexander, who moved swiftly, mounting and mastering the steed. Henceforth the proud horse belonged to Alexander and was called Bucephalos, which means The One with the Head of an Ox.Shown in the gallery in a display box, that one is not included but another box will be provided free of charge

Code: 23076

425.00 GBP

Archived


Ancient Greek Hellenistic Iron Seal Ring, with Lion Alexander the Great Era

Ancient Greek Hellenistic Iron Seal Ring, with Lion Alexander the Great Era

Worn by a warrior of ancient Greece, an Hellenistic iron signet ring engraved, Alexandrian Period, 4th century BC.
The bezel is engraved with what we believe to be the remains of a stylized lion. Iron rings in ancient Greece were highly esteemed, and worn by men of the warrior class, for the wearing of gold rings was considered effeminate or barbarian. From the time of Alexander, son of Philip II of Macedon, and his conquests of the known world. While Alexander's army mainly fielded Pezhetairoi (Foot Companions) as his main force, his army also included some classic Hoplites, either provided by the League of Corinth or from hired mercenaries. Beside these units, the Macedonians also used the so-called Hypaspists, an elite force of units possibly originally fighting as Hoplites and used to guard the exposed right wing of Alexander's phalanx. Today, Alexander the Great is still considered one of the most successful military leaders in history. His conquests shaped not just eastern and western culture but also the history of the world. Alexander was born July 20, 356 BC in Pella, a city in the Ancient Greek Kingdom of Macedonia. As the son of Philip II, King of Macedon, Alexander was raised as a noble Macedonian youth. Learning to read, play the lyre, ride, fight, and hunt were high priorities for Alexander.

As he got older, his father had the famous Aristotle tutor his son. His father knew he could no longer effectively challenge the mind and body of his son. Aristotle educated Alexander and his companions in various disciplines such as medicine, philosophy, morality, religion, logic, and art. Many of his study companions would later become generals in his army.

When King Philip was assassinated, Alexander ascended to the throne at the young age of 20. After quelling small uprisings and rebellions after his father?s death, Alexander began his campaign against the Persian Empire.

Crossing into Asia with over 100,000 men, he began his war against Persia which lasted more than seven years. Alexander displayed tactical brilliance in the fight against the Persian army, remaining undefeated despite having fewer soldiers.

His successes took him to the very edge of India, to the banks of the Ganges River. His armies feared the might of the Indian empires and mutinied, which marked the end of his campaign to the East. He had intended to march further into India, but he was persuaded against it because his soldiers wanted to return to their families.

Alexander died unexpectedly after his return to Babylon. Because his death was sudden and he did not name a successor to his throne, his empire fell into chaos as generals fought to take control. Painting in the gallery of Alexander the Great by Gaspare Diziani. Alexander the Great in thirty two years of life, conquered and expanded the Persian Empire. Since he studied Greek philosopher's ideas about democracy, he allowed the people he conquered to rule themselves. He never lost a battle. There is a story about a black stallion that one day started running wildly through the courtyard. Five trainers chased it but were unable to mount it. All of a sudden the horse stopped short. Not a soul dared to approach except young Alexander, who moved swiftly, mounting and mastering the steed. Henceforth the proud horse belonged to Alexander and was called Bucephalos, which means The One with the Head of an Ox.Shown in the gallery in a display box, that one is not included but another box will be provided free of charge

Code: 23077

425.00 GBP

Archived


A Fabulous Medieval Period Bronze Poison Ring, With Gemstone Bezel

A Fabulous Medieval Period Bronze Poison Ring, With Gemstone Bezel

14th to 15th century, from the Edward Ist to Henry Vth period. A superb example of the intrigues of the politics of poisoning in medieval Europe. The bezel would have once held a coloured gemstone, and beneath its box compartment it could contain the lethal dose of poison, with the holes either side east and west to facilitate both its entrance and exit. Entrance by powder through the hole, and exit by dissolving through the hole in the victim's wine. A poison ring or pillbox ring is a type of ring with a container under the bezel or inside the bezel itself which could be used to hold poison or another substance; they became popular in Europe during the sixteenth century. The poison ring was used either to slip poison into an enemy's food or drink, or to facilitate the suicide of the wearer in order to preclude capture or torture. In Italy to this day pouring someone a drink whilst holding the bottle with the back of the hand facing downward, so as to let something drop from a ring bezel, is called versare alla traditora (?traitor?s way pouring?) and still considered offensive. One way is the dangle the ring in the goblet and let the poison flow through the holes into to the wine, as can be seen in the picture in the gallery, The Royal Art of Poison.

Rings like this have been used throughout history to carry perfume, locks of hair, devotional relics, messages and other keepsakes, so they have also been known by other names. Artists would paint tiny portraits of loved ones, to be carried in what was called a ?locket ring,? which was popular during the Renaissance. By the 17th century, jewellers were creating locket rings in the shape of caskets which served as mementos for mourners. These were called ?funeral rings.? Rings with compartments are also called ?box? rings or ?socket? rings. In 2013 Bulgarian archaeologists unearthed a most similar well-preserved bronze poison ring, used to spike an opponent's goblet of wine or dinner with a deadly dose of toxicity.

The 14th Century piece of jewellery was found at the site of a medieval fortress on Cape Kaliakra close to the town of Kavarna on the Bulgarian Black Sea coast.

Archaeologists believe the ring would have likely belonged to a wealthy and power-hungry male with political ambitions and was filled with poison. It is the first ring of its kind to be uncovered in Bulgaria, according to the deputy director of the National Archaeology Institute and Museum in Sofia, Boni Petrunova.

She told the Sofia Globe, that the ring was made of bronze and has a small box welded to the bezel.

Dr Petrunova said: 'I have no doubts that the hole is there on purpose and the ring was worn on the right hand, because the hole was made in such a way so as to be covered by a finger, so that the poison can be dropped at a moment?s notice.'

'Clearly, it was not worn constantly and would have been put on when necessary.' One of the many arts cultivated in Renaissance Italy was the black art of poisoning. The Medici Granducal Archives are teeming with references to this nefarious branch of chemistry, including a series of documents confirming Grand Duke Cosimo I de' Medici's involvement in a plot to assassinate Piero Strozzi by means of poisoned food or drink in 1548. In February of that year, an anonymous tipster writing in cipher to Cosimo pointed out that ?P St usually stops to drink a few times during his journey,' and explained that all that was needed was ?an excellent toxin that could simply be put in his drinking flask.' A 1563 inventory of Cosimo's personal archive implicates him further in such sordid affairs: it shows that he kept a recipe for a deadly poison among his important private papers.
Cosimo's son Ferdinando, suspected by some to have poisoned his older brother Francesco in order to attain the Granducal throne in 1587, was every bit his father's son, even in this assassin's art. Damning evidence of his darker side is in a letter Ferdinando wrote to his agent in Milan in 1590: ?A little poison is being sent to you, made just for this purpose ? the entire quantity is sufficient to poison a whole flask of wine, and don't use any less, and it is odorless, tasteless, and has extremely powerful effects as long as you mix it well with the wine?' Ferdinando also promised his agent that up to four thousand scudi would be rewarded to the person who succeeded in carrying out these instructions for murder.

Code: 23079

875.00 GBP

Archived


A Superb Iron, Long Bow Archer's Thumb-ring, From the Era of The Battle of Crecy 1346

A Superb Iron, Long Bow Archer's Thumb-ring, From the Era of The Battle of Crecy 1346

A very small collection of original medieval archer's rings we acquired. Items such as this, that we are privileged to offer, were oft acquired in the 18th and early 19th century by British aristocracy touring Northern France and Italy on their classical Grand Tour. Originally, when they were returned to Britain, they were placed on display in the family 'cabinet of curiosities', within their country houses, and there they remained for, say, 180 to 200 years until they arrived here with us. A popular pastime in the 18th and 19th century, comprised of British ladies and gentlemen traveling for many months, or even years, throughout classical Europe, and the Middle East, acquiring antiquities and antiques from the regions around famous battle sites [such as Crecy and Agincourt] for their private collections. This ring was one of the slightly earlier ones we had, 14th century made of iron. The Battle of Crecy, was an important English victory during the Hundred Years' War.

The battle was fought on 26 August 1346 near Crecy, in northern France. An army of English, Welsh and allied troops from the Holy Roman Empire led by Edward III defeated a much larger army of French, Genoese and Majorcan troops led by Philip VI of France. Emboldened by the lessons of tactical flexibility and utilisation of terrain learned from the earlier Saxons, Vikings and the recent battles with the Scots, the English army, despite being heavily outnumbered by the French, won a decisive victory.

The battle saw the rise in power of the longbow as the dominant battlefield weapon, whose effects were devastating when used en-masse. Crecy also saw the use of some very early cannon by the army. The combined-arms approach of the English, the new weapons and tactics used, which was far more focused on the infantry than previous battles in the middle-ages and the killing of incapacitated knights by peasantry after the battle has led to the engagement being described as "the beginning of the end of chivalry".

The battle crippled the French army's ability to come to the aid of Calais, which fell to the English the following year. Calais would remain under English rule for over two centuries, falling in 1558. Upon the death of the French monarch Charles IV in 1328, the throne was legally supposed to pass to Edward III of England, the closest male relative. A French court, however, decreed that the closest relative of Charles was his first cousin, Philip, Count of Valois. Philip was crowned as Philip VI of France.Shown in the gallery in a display box, that one is not included but another box will be provided free of charge

Code: 23141

425.00 GBP

Archived


An Imperial Roman to Early Middle Ages Ring Key

An Imperial Roman to Early Middle Ages Ring Key

2nd century to 5th century. Ancient Roman to Middle ages period bronze key ring. Worn either on a finger or even using a cord. For lack of pockets in their togas, the ancient Romans often wore keys to important boxes, etc on their fingers. The most intriguing items of Roman security hardware seem to be keys and lock bolts. Keys were used mainly for doors, chests, boxes, caskets, cupboards and padlocks. Less often they were used for ceremonial or decorative purposes, such as matron keys, jewelry items and votive offerings.

It is alleged that some ring keys were worn by women as symbols of household authority, as "keeper of the keys". This is probably true, but such are difficult to identify as having served that purpose. The wooden Egyptian pin tumbler locks were over two thousand years old by this time. Roman engineers modernized them and other lock constructions by replacing the wooden parts with corresponding parts made of metal.

The clumsy Egyptian pin tumbler locks were transformed into elegant Roman pin tumbler locks of steel, fitted with an ingenious Roman invention, steel springs. The locks were often tiny masterpieces in terms of both precision and design. All Roman door locks can only be opened from one side. There were illustrations in Le case e monumenti di Pompeii, four volumes by Fausto and Felice Niccolini, printed in Naples in 1854–96. Another author, Albert Neuburger, used the same images in his book on ancient technology, Die Technik des Altertums, printed in Leipzig in 1921. The cities of Pompeii and Herculaneum were buried in ash when the nearby volcano Mount Vesuvius erupted in 79 AD, and were eventually forgotten.likely work over the first knuckle before the second, British size Large

Code: 23789

195.00 GBP

Archived


A Fabulous 19th Century 'Grand Tour' Ormulu Gilt Bronze Statue of Napoleon after Emile Seurre, Napoleon I's Statue in the Cour d'honneur Les Invalides Paris.

A Fabulous 19th Century 'Grand Tour' Ormulu Gilt Bronze Statue of Napoleon after Emile Seurre, Napoleon I's Statue in the Cour d'honneur Les Invalides Paris.

Superb quality representation with finest pure gold over bronze to create French ormolu, circa 1835. Mounted on the King George IVth mahogany cannon barrel plinth.

The plinth is a most beautiful homage to the base structure on the first and original location of the Seurre Napoleon statue in Place Vendome, in Paris, a cylindrical column plinth made from the cannon captured at Austerlitz. Hence its design as a stylised cannon barrel. It was later that the statue was re-located to Les Invalide, where it still resides.

Emile Seurre, created one of the most famous images of Napoleon Bonaparte. With his hand on his stomach, dressed in his frock coat and bearing the famous bicorn hat, this representation of the “petit Corporal” was used a lot to symbolise Napoleon as a military hero. Commissioned by King Louis-Philippe, this sculpture was inaugurated in 1833 Place Vendôme to replace an statue of Napoleon dressed as a Roman Emperor. The 4 metre tall statue weighs 5 tonnes. It was made from Austrian and Russian cannons seized during Napoleon’s campaign in 1805 and stored in the arsenal of Metz. 30 years later, Napoleon III, who wanted to restore the imperial image of his uncle, removed it. It was therefore installed at the end of the historic axis of Paris, at the rond-point de Courbevoie.

The Franco-Prussian war broke out in 1870. The population recovered the statue to protect it from fighting. But while it was travelling on the Seine on a boat, it fell into the water. Fished out 4 months later, it was found in two pieces. During the fall, the head had separated from the body!

Richard Lassels, an expatriate Roman Catholic priest, first used the phrase “Grand Tour” in his 1670 book Voyage to Italy, published posthumously in Paris in 1670. In its introduction, Lassels listed four areas in which travel furnished "an accomplished, consummate traveler" with opportunities to experience first hand the intellectual, the social, the ethical, and the political life of the Continent.

The English gentry of the 17th century believed that what a person knew came from the physical stimuli to which he or she has been exposed. Thus, being on-site and seeing famous works of art and history was an all important part of the Grand Tour. So most Grand Tourists spent the majority of their time visiting museums and historic sites.

Once young men began embarking on these journeys, additional guidebooks and tour guides began to appear to meet the needs of the 20-something male and female travelers and their tutors traveling a standard European itinerary. They carried letters of reference and introduction with them as they departed from southern England, enabling them to access money and invitations along the way.

With nearly unlimited funds, aristocratic connections and months or years to roam, these wealthy young tourists commissioned paintings, perfected their language skills and mingled with the upper crust of the Continent.

The wealthy believed the primary value of the Grand Tour lay in the exposure both to classical antiquity and the Renaissance, and to the aristocratic and fashionably polite society of the European continent. In addition, it provided the only opportunity to view specific works of art, and possibly the only chance to hear certain music. A Grand Tour could last from several months to several years. The youthful Grand Tourists usually traveled in the company of a Cicerone, a knowledgeable guide or tutor.

However, the Grand Tour was neither a scholar's pilgrimage nor a religious one. Many Grand Tourists traveled with all the trapping—valets and coachmen, perhaps a cook, and certainly a scholarly guide.

For gentlemen, some works of art were essential to demonstrate the breadth and polish they had received from their tour. In Rome, Thomas Jenkins provided access to private collections of antiquities. Many had their portraits painted by Pompeo Batoni while posing among Roman antiquities.


Since there were few museums anywhere in Europe before the end of the 18th century, Grand Tourists often saw paintings and sculptures by gaining admission to private collections, and many were eager to acquire examples of Greco-Roman and Italian art for their own collections. In England, where architecture was increasingly seen as an aristocratic pursuit, noblemen often applied what they learned from the villas of Palladio in Venice and the evocative ruins of Rome to their own country houses and gardens, as well as to the furniture and accessories they contained.

After the arrival of steam-powered transportation in 1825, the Grand Tour continued, but with several major differences. It was less expensive to undertake, safer, easier, and most importantly, open to anyone. During much of the 19th century, most educated young men of privilege undertook the Grand Tour. Later, it became fashionable for young women to do so as well. Who can forget the trip to Italy, with a spinster aunt as chaperon, Baedecker guide in hand, featured in E. M. Forster's novel A Room with a View.

Approx 14.25 inches high overall

Code: 24351

745.00 GBP

Archived


EUROPEAN CHAMPIONS.  !!!   2;1    2;1    2;1.   The Heartiest of Congratulations to the Greatest England Football Team in Years!!!

EUROPEAN CHAMPIONS. !!! 2;1 2;1 2;1. The Heartiest of Congratulations to the Greatest England Football Team in Years!!!

England's Lionesses were simply amazing on Sunday beating the incredible team from Germany 2;1

The whole of England should be proud of their skill and determination to play a sound, fair game, and it was to the UK’s eternal shame that the FA provided not an open bus parade through London, in fact they deserved so much more than even that.

Of course it was the FA that banned female football for decades, so what should we expect, nothing less than a shamefully poor show of appreciation, thanks and all due honours to England’s greatest football team since 1966.

Well, millions of us love you Lionesses, even if the FA don’t show it as is befitting the Champions of Europe.

If I may paraphrase thus;

“Thou sodden-witted FA! Thou hast no more brain than I have in mine elbows “

[All due apologies to the Bard]

Code: 24349

Price
on
Request

Archived


A Super, Original, Colt Navy .36 Cal. Service Revolver, 1851 Pattern Civil War Issue

A Super, Original, Colt Navy .36 Cal. Service Revolver, 1851 Pattern Civil War Issue

6 shot .36" Colt Model 1851 Navy percussion revolver, octagonal barrel, with matching numbers on all major parts, the barrel having New York US America address. Very strong mainspring, and clean overall. The Colt Revolver of Navy calibre .36, was produced from 1851 until 1873 and in that time over 250,000 Navies were made, 215,340 pistols were produced in Hartford, Connecticut and 42’000 were produced in London, England, with state-of-the-art machines and dedicated production lines; back then the most technologically advanced factories in the world. The designation "Colt 1851 Navy" was designated by collectors, though the popular name "Navy Revolver" is of early origin, as the gun was frequently called the "Colt Revolving Belt Pistol of Naval Caliber." The cylinder was often engraved with a scene of the victory of the Second Texas Navy at the Battle of Campeche in May 16, 1843. The Texas Navy had purchased the earlier Colt Paterson Revolver, but this was Colt's first major success in the gun trade; the naval theme of the engraved cylinder of the Colt 1851 Navy revolver was Colt's gesture of appreciation. Despite the "Navy" designation, the revolver was chiefly purchased by civilians and military land forces. Famous "Navy" users included Wild Bill Hickok, William Buffalo Bill Cody, John Henry "Doc" Holliday, Richard Francis Burton, Ned Kelly, Bully Hayes, Richard H. Barter, Robert E. Lee, Nathan B. Forrest, John O'Neill, Frank Gardiner, Quantrill's Raiders, John Coffee "Jack" Hays, "Bigfoot" Wallace, Frederick Townsend Ward, Ben McCulloch, Addison Gillespie, John "Rip" Ford, "Sul" Ross and most Texas Rangers prior to the Civil War. Usage continued long after more modern cartridge revolvers were introduced in 1873. Wild Bill Hickok was a legendary character in the Old West and a great exponent of the Colt Navy 1851. Wild Bill arrived in the West initially as a stage coach driver and later became a Lawman in the territories around Kansas and Nebraska. He fought during the American Civil War on the side of the Union Army and achieved renown afterwards as a scout, gambler and gunfighter. During his time as a Lawman Wild Bill engaged in many shootouts, and with his Colt Navy 1851 he was a very accurate and deadly shot, more so as he always remained calm, cool and collected in a shoot out, whilst the other party was nervous and scared. Hickok's guns were inscribed they also had ivory handles like this example and were quite special pieces. Apparently they were both engraved with the words J.B. Hickok 1869. He was presented the guns in 1869 by Senator Henry Wilson of Massachusetts for his services as scout for a hunting trip. It was said to have been remarked by a Colt Navy owner "A Gentleman would not want to appear armed, but would not be so foolish as to go unarmed.
As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables. Working order action & usual signs of combat use age appropriate wear as to be expected.

Code: 24334

3150.00 GBP

Archived


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