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A Victorian So Called Gambler's Dagger

Mother'o Pearl handle, nickel mounts and double edged blade maker marked by Slater Bros. the Venture pattern. A gamblers dagger was so called due to their attractiveness and useful size for concealment H.M. Slater ltd. Sheffield England from c1853. Venture Works, 105 Arundel Street, Sheffield England. No scabbard Blade 3.75 inches, overall 7.25 inches long

Code: 22487

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German WW2 War Merit Cross with Swords

This award was created by German dictator Adolf Hitler in 1939 as a successor to the non-combatant Iron Cross which was used in earlier wars (same medal but with a different ribbon). The award was graded the same as the Iron Cross: War Merit Cross Second Class, War Merit Cross First Class, and Knights Cross of the War Merit Cross. The award had two variants: with swords given to soldiers for exceptional service in battle above and beyond the call of duty but not in the face of the enemy. Without swords version was for civilians. General Karl Wolff, SS-Oberstgruppenfûhrer Friedrich Otto, and SS-Oberstgruppenfûhrer Gotlob Berger were all awarded and wore versions of this form of award

Code: 23758

95.00 GBP

Archived


A Pair Of Wonderful Original King George IIIrd Naval Cannon, Circa 1790's

Made in the latter part of the 18th century. An amazing pair of original Trafalgar period British naval cannon, Cast iron 6-pounder smoothbore muzzle loading carronades, Blomefield pattern, with breeching ring, cast royal ‘Crowns’ and “6 Pr” beneath, mounted on wooden naval pattern gun carriages, the cascabels with rope loops. Photos in the gallery show this actual pair in a country garden display, and other similar looking cannon of the same age recently shown aboard HMS Victory at Portsmouth. Artillery preserved in the province of Nova Scotia, at Annapolis Royal, Fort Anne, show on display an identical King George IIIrd naval 6 pdr carronade to these.



Caronnades are low velocity shorter cannon, able to fire very effectively powered charges but, conveniently, shorter in length than regular cannon of similar bore. At the Battle of Trafalgar one of the first shots fired by the British was a caronnade, that shot through the stern of a French ship, right through the ship's length, and killed around a quarter of the crew in one shot. The name carronade is attributed to the Carron Company of Falkirk, Scotland who produced these types of weapons from 1776. Initially the weapons were known as Marine Guns and those produced without the royal naval crown mark were sold to chiefly British and Spanish merchants who had to arm their own vessels, the guns were lighter than 'long' guns which was important to merchant vessels who at the time had to deal with privateers and American Naval vessels prowling off the British Isles.



This 'Marine' gun was in effect a prototype of the Carronade, the first carronades were installed on a ship called Spitfire which was of 200ton and at the time fitting out in Liverpool. Spitfire was soon in action and reportedly did very well despite heavy odds.



This new cannon weapon was also in demand by privateers sailing against vessels from America, the Captain of the Sharp of Glasgow attributed a victory in an engagement off Cape Clear to the new gun as did the Hawke (also from Glasgow) which fought off two privateers in the Bay of Biscay in July 1779.



The carronade had appeal because it offered a large calibre for relatively little size and weight, a 42 pounder carronade was shorter than a 3 pounder long gun and weighed less than a 12 pounder. Another advantage was a carronade took less men to operate, the normal crew for a 24 pounder long gun was 11men whilst a 42 pounder carronade could be operated by a crew of 4. The carronade was also easier and quicker to load and fire with 11 broadsides to an enemies 3 reported. The carronade guns were introduced into British naval service in 1779 and were produced in sizes up to 68 pounder, by January 1781 429 Royal Navy ships mounted 604 carronades. These cannon were set on on wooden carriages. There is another rare example exactly as this one in Australia at Anglesea Barracks, Hobart, Tasmania,. But their 6 Pounder Carronade, is set on a concrete plinth, and is inscribed like ours on the first reinforce of the barrel with a Crown and the number 6.

The Crown on each cannon is indicative of Government service.

Their cannon was donated by the Hopkins family who were early settlers of Van Diemens Land and resided at 'Westella' in North Hobart



The plaque for their cannon is inscribed:' This cannon which was landed in the early nineteenth century, for the defence of Hobart Town, was presented by the Hopkins family in memory of Lt. Thomas Hopkins, of Australian Military Forces'. Carronades initially became popular on British merchant ships during the American Revolutionary War. A lightweight gun that needed only a small gun crew and was devastating at short range was a weapon well suited to defending merchant ships against French and American Privateers. It was Lord Sandwich who eventually started mounting them in place of the light guns on the forecastle and quarterdeck of ships. They soon proved their effectiveness in battle. French gun foundries were unable to produce equivalents for twenty years, so carronades gave British warships a significant tactical advantage during the latter part of the 18th century. The carronade was initially very successful and widely adopted, and a few experimental ships (for example, HMS Glatton and HMS Rainbow) were fitted with a carronade-only armament. Glatton, a Fourth-rate ship with 56 guns, had a more destructive broadside than HMS Victory, a First-rate ship with 100 guns. Glatton and Rainbow were both successful in battle.

They are 49 inches long including carriage overall each, 26 inches wide overall each at the axle width. Collection by arrangement only, not part of any special offers or discounts at any time

Code: 23213

18500.00 GBP

Archived


Original Hallmarked Silver ARP Air Raid Precautions Officer's Badge Dated 1939

hallmarked alongside the London silver mark is J.C., that represents - Sir John Herbert McCutcheon Craig from 1938. - Deputy Master and Comptroller of the Royal Mint. The most visible members of the ARP were the air raid wardens. ARP posts were initially set up in the warden’s home, or in a shop or an office, but they were later purpose-built. Each post covered a certain area, varying across the country, but with about ten to the square mile in London. Each post was divided into sectors, with perhaps three to six wardens in each sector. An ARP warden was almost always local - it was essential that he or she knew their sector and the people living there.
Between the declaration of war and the first bombings on British towns in 1940 there was a long period when nothing happened. This later became known as the 'phoney war' and was a very difficult time for the air raid precaution service because a lot of people resented the way they were told to "put that light out" or had to suffer rationing and evacuation when it seemed there was no reason to. Members of the public also began to resent what they saw as the "darts brigade" because the air raid wardens had little to do in this period and some had been spotted playing darts in their air raid warden's posts to pass the time. However, during the Blitz of 1940-1 wardens and other civil defence personnel proved themselves indispensable and heroic. Whenever the air raid sirens sounded, the wardens would help people into the nearest shelter and then tour their sector, usually in pairs, at considerable risk from bombs, shrapnel and falling masonry. They would also check regularly on those in the air raid shelters.
In the aftermath of a raid, ARP wardens would often be first on the scene, carrying out first-aid if there were minor casualties, putting out any small fires and helping to organise the emergency response. Other members of the Civil Defence services included rescue and stretcher (or first-aid) parties, the staff of control centres and messenger boys. Their work often overlapped with the fire and medical services and the WVS (Women's Voluntary Service).
Air Raid Wardens had several main duties that they were trained to perform, which were all very difficult and time consuming tasks. They had to supervise the blackout, and report people to the police who continually ignored it. They had to sound the air raid sirens so that everybody knew that they had to get to the shelter, as well as supervising people getting in and out of the air raid shelters. They also had to check that everybody had their gas masks, and that they were all fitting properly, as well as sounding alerts if there was a gas attack. In addition to this, they also had to evavuate people away from unexploded bombs, and report the bombs and other damage to the warden control centre.
1924: ARP service created
1935: local councils asked to provide ARP protection measures
1938: gas masks issued to the public
1939: War begins
1940: First Air Raids on Britain
1941: ARP service changed to 'Civil Defence' service, to include other services such as fire and rescue
1945: War ends, service disbanded. The silver Air Raid Precautions (ARP) lapel badge that was adopted was designed by the sculptor Eric Gill from a design submitted in April 1936. Gill was paid three guineas (£3 & 3 shillings - about £210 in 2018) in January 1937 for his design. A renowned typeface designer (amongst other skills) Gill utilised large capital letters with a slightly more prominent 'R' and two interpoints (dots). Above the ARP initials Gill placed the standard Tudor (King's) crown which also appears on army, air force and navy insignia.

Code: 23730

28.00 GBP

Archived


A Scarce WW2 British Chief Air Raid Warden's Steel Helmet. Pre Battle of Britain Period Manufactured Helmet , Dated 1939

In the Chief Warden's livery of white with two black stripes fore and aft between two Ws. Traditional steel Brodie British Army combat helmet, made in 1939, before the Battle of Britain, by Rubery Owen Co. with original liner and strap in superb condition. A helmet converted and top repainted to become an ARP chief's. This is a very nice true combat example of a genuine British Mark 1 steel army helmet that is dated 1939, with green under paint. The stamping under the brim is RO.CO it stands for Rubery Owen & Co Ltd of Leeds who made helmets from 1939 to 1943. A great earliest war period example in untouched condition, re-painted for the ARP pattern. The most visible members of the ARP were the air raid wardens. ARP posts were initially set up in the warden’s home, or in a shop or an office, but they were later purpose-built. Each post covered a certain area, varying across the country, but with about ten to the square mile in London. Each post was divided into sectors, with perhaps three to six wardens in each sector. An ARP warden was almost always local - it was essential that he or she knew their sector and the people living there.
Between the declaration of war and the first bombings on British towns in 1940 there was a long period when nothing happened. This later became known as the 'phoney war' and was a very difficult time for the air raid precaution service because a lot of people resented the way they were told to "put that light out" or had to suffer rationing and evacuation when it seemed there was no reason to. Members of the public also began to resent what they saw as the "darts brigade" because the air raid wardens had little to do in this period and some had been spotted playing darts in their air raid warden's posts to pass the time. However, during the Blitz of 1940-1 wardens and other civil defence personnel proved themselves indispensable and heroic. Whenever the air raid sirens sounded, the wardens would help people into the nearest shelter and then tour their sector, usually in pairs, at considerable risk from bombs, shrapnel and falling masonry. They would also check regularly on those in the air raid shelters.

In the aftermath of a raid, ARP wardens would often be first on the scene, carrying out first-aid if there were minor casualties, putting out any small fires and helping to organise the emergency response. Other members of the Civil Defence services included rescue and stretcher (or first-aid) parties, the staff of control centres and messenger boys. Their work often overlapped with the fire and medical services and the WVS (Women's Voluntary Service).
Air Raid Wardens had several main duties that they were trained to perform, which were all very difficult and time consuming tasks. They had to supervise the blackout, and report people to the police who continually ignored it. They had to sound the air raid sirens so that everybody knew that they had to get to the shelter, as well as supervising people getting in and out of the air raid shelters. They also had to check that everybody had their gas masks, and that they were all fitting properly, as well as sounding alerts if there was a gas attack. In addition to this, they also had to evavuate people away from unexploded bombs, and report the bombs and other damage to the warden control centre.
1924: ARP service created

1935: local councils asked to provide ARP protection measures

1938: gas masks issued to the public

1939: War begins


1940: First Air Raids on Britain

1941: ARP service changed to 'Civil Defence' service, to include other services such as fire and rescue

1945: War ends, service disbanded. One photo in the gallery is of two famous and fantastic British character actors, the late Bill Pertwee as Chief Warden Hodges and Arthur Lowe as Captain Mainwaring as seen in BBC'S TV & Film Comedy "Dad's Army". Bill was a Brighton regular, and much missed.

Code: 23729

275.00 GBP

Archived


A Most Rare And Extremely Desirable WW2 German Army / Waffen-SS Panzer Assault Badge for 50 Engagements by Josef Feix & Sohne (JFS), Silver Grade

WW2 German Army / Waffen-SS Panzer Assault Badge for 50 Engagements by Josef Feix & Sohne Gablonz (JFS), a super example of these rare and highly collectable silver grade, maker marked, 50 engagements, German tank assault badge. The award has the correct crimped fittings to the reverse of the award. Complete with the original fixing rivets to the reverse. The pin catch and hook both show wear bending and the catch is retaining the pin so it cant be lifted, probably not prudent to bend the catch back, which can be seen under magnification. The pin is magnetic and the right shape which is correct for this maker. The blackened number box has the correct numeral font for 50 engagement awards. Badge has JFS makers mark to the reverse of the wreath. Overall this is a good condition award. A most special award for taking part in over 50 panzer [tank] combat engagements in battle.
(Wehrmacht Heer Panzerkampfabzeichen mit Einsatzzahl 50). Instituted in June 1943 by Walther von Brauchitsch. (Issued 1943-1945). Constructed of silvered zinc, the obverse consisting of a border of oak leaves with a box at the base displaying the numeral “50”, with a Panzer superimposed in the centre rolling over wooden logs, with its left tank track extending over the edge of the badge, The reverse plain with a vertical banjo style magnetic steel pin, a crimped barrel hinge and a crimped flat wire catch, with two rivets on the reverse, marked “JFS” for “Josef Feix & Söhne” on the reverse, measuring approx. 44.5 mm (oval wreath width) x 61.9 mm (total height), in overall better than fine condition. The Panzer Assault Badge in bronze was introduced by Generaloberst Walther von Brauchitsch on June 1st 1940 for award to Panzer personnel who participated in three different armoured assaults on three different days, however the special '50' grade, as this one is, was for over 50 combat assaults, a simply remarkable amount considering the survival rates for close counter panzer engagements in WW2. The design of the badge was based on the earlier instituted Panzer Assault Badge in silver for Panzer personnel. However by June 1943 it was realized that the Panzer Assault Badge didn’t sufficiently recognise the number of assaults participated in by panzer personnel, which resulted in the introduction of the numbered Special Grade of the Panzer Assault Badge in both silver and bronze versions on June 22nd 1943. The numbered Special Grade of the Panzer Assault Badge were awarded with the numerals, 25, 50, 75 and 100. The numbered badges followed the basic design of their un-numbered predecessors but were larger and had the addition of an inset rectangular plate with a numeral to the bottom of the wreath. During the 1920s and early 1930s, the Germans worked with the Soviets in clandestine tank study at various secret bases in Russia. There were secret military bases near Voronezh where German officers could actually drive real tanks in violation of the treaty. This close pre-war cooperation, incidentally, is probably one reason Stalin was so blindsided by Operation Barbarossa. It is logical to assume that the special grade awards could only realistically be gained from the Eastern Front, such as the Battle of Kursk or from Normandy up to the Battle of the Bulge as these were the great tank engagement eras of WW2. A 'silver class 50 award for Panzer crew is likely one of the highest and rarest of all the grades to be awarded as the survival rate of the panzer crews was pitifully low, and simply too few men survived anywhere near the over 50 combat tank battles criteria. Its silver wreath wash is mostly gone. See Volume II of “The German Panzer Assault Badge of World War II” by Philippe De Bock.

Code: 23724

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SOLD A Superb Antique 1870's Zulu Tribal Club-Axe, Zulu War Souvenir

Part knopkerrie part axe, with detachable blade. A most superior and heavy grade example. See 1927 Bannerman catalogue for similar examples. A super example perfectly usable as a most effective knopkerrie club, then the forged axe head inserted for ceremonies and even combat if needed. The club top is blackened, the bottom shaft plain polished wood, with a typical knopkerrie swelling at the shaft's end.The Zulu army was run with regiments like the western armies. With warriors, [impi] middle ranking and senior ranking officers and higher ranked supremos. In one to one combat, the Zulu Impi [warrior] was expertly trained to aim his club blow at an opponents head, which often gave a more catastrophic and urgently needed instant and debilitating result, whereas a spear stab, which may indeed give a mortal wound, might leave an opponent that could still effectively fight back for some considerable time. During the 1879 Zulu War, two of most famous pair of engagements in the British army's history, during the last quarter of the 19th century, happened over two consecutive days. Curiously, it is fair to say that these two engagements, by the 24th Foot, against the mighty Zulu Impi, are iconic examples of how successful or unsuccessful leadership can result, in either the very best conclusion, or the very worst. And amazingly, within only one day of each other. The 1879 Zulu War, for the 24th Foot, will, for many, only mean two significant events, Isandlhwana and Rorke's Drift. This is the brief story of the 24th Foot in South Africa; In 1875 the 1st Battalion arrived in Southern Africa and subsequently saw service, along with the 2nd Battalion, in the 9th Xhosa War in 1878. In 1879 both battalions took part in the Zulu War, begun after a British invasion of Zululand, ruled by Cetshwayo. The 24th Foot took part in the crossing of the Buffalo River on 11 January, entering Zululand. The first engagement (and the most disastrous for the British) came at Isandhlwana. The British had pitched camp at Isandhlwana and not established any fortifications due to the sheer size of the force, the hard ground and a shortage of entrenching tools. The 24th Foot provided most of the British force and when the overall commander, Lord Chelmsford, split his forces on 22 January to search for the Zulus, the 1st Battalion (5 companies) and a company of the 2nd Battalion were left behind to guard the camp, under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel Henry Pulleine (CO of the 1/24th Foot).

The Zulus, 22,000 strong, attacked the camp and their sheer numbers overwhelmed the British. As the officers paced their men far too far apart to face the coming onslaught. During the battle Lieutenant-Colonel Pulleine ordered Lieutenants Coghill and Melvill to save the Queen's Colour the Regimental Colour was located at Helpmakaar with G Company. The two Lieutenants attempted to escape by crossing the Buffalo River where the Colour fell and was lost downstream, later being recovered. Both officers were killed. At this time the Victoria Cross (VC) was not awarded posthumously. we show in the gallery a photo of two period Zulu both with axe clubs , one a rare inserted circular axe head, and another very similar club axe, but in very poor condition indeed, formerly from the Peter von Bush collection sold at auction in Sweden a few years ago

Code: 23719

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A Superb and Rare WW ll 1940 Canadian Military Machete - Legitimus Collins - No 1250

Exactly as was issued and used by Canadian tank crews in 1942, in operation Jubilee, at the Dieppe raid in 1942. Machete - Legitimus Collins & Co No 1250 - in original leather sheath. The machete was produced by the Canadian company Legitimus & Collins in Montreal.This is their rarer early model shaped blade, than their later, longer blade model mostly made by Collins made for the US marines. This is their most desirable type.
The machete is 50 cm long and comes in the original leather sheath, both of them are stamped.
Each tank, artillery piece or heavy vehicle had one mandatory one during World War ll.
The blade is made of hardened steel and the handle is of bakelite and still in very good condition. The sheath was made by Hugh Carson Co Ltd Ottawa and dated 1942 and is the same pattern as used by the British Army. Photo in the gallery of the same Canadian Collins machete being held by a German Kriegsmarine Bootsmann, he is wielding the Canadian machete knife taken from the immobilised and deserted Churchill tank ("Boar" T32049) of Sgt. J Sullivan, B Squadron, in the August, 1942 Dieppe Raid. Although the attack was a disaster for the Allies, they obtained valuable information about German radar and learned important lessons about required equipment and combined arms techniques for successful amphibious landings that would be applied to later landings such as Operation Torch and Operation Overlord.Operation Jubilee or the Dieppe Raid (19 August 1942) was an Allied amphibious attack on the German-occupied port of Dieppe in northern France, during the Second World War. Over 6,050 infantry, predominantly Canadian, supported by a regiment of tanks, were put ashore from a naval force operating under protection of Royal Air Force (RAF) fighters.

The port was to be captured and held for a short period, to test the feasibility of a landing and to gather intelligence. German coastal defences, port structures and important buildings were to be demolished. The raid was intended to boost Allied morale, demonstrate the commitment of the United Kingdom to re-open the Western Front and support the Soviet Union, fighting on the Eastern Front.

Aerial and naval support was insufficient to enable the ground forces to achieve their objectives; the tanks were trapped on the beach and the infantry was largely prevented from entering the town by obstacles and German fire. After less than six hours, mounting casualties forced a retreat. The operation was a fiasco in which only one landing force achieved its objective and some intelligence including electronic intelligence was gathered.

Within ten hours, of the 6,086 men who landed, 3,623 had been killed, wounded or became prisoners of war. The Luftwaffe made a maximum effort against the landing as the RAF had expected, but the RAF lost 106 aircraft (at least 32 to anti-aircraft fire or accidents) against 48 German losses. The Royal Navy lost 33 landing craft and a destroyer.

Both sides learned important lessons regarding coastal assaults. The Allies learned lessons that influenced the success of the D-Day landings. Artificial harbours were declared crucial, tanks were adapted specifically for beaches, a new integrated tactical air force strengthened ground support, and capturing a major port at the outset was no longer seen as a priority. Churchill and Mountbatten both claimed that these lessons had outweighed the cost. The Germans believed that Dieppe was a learning experience and made a considerable effort to improve the way they defended the occupied coastlines of Europe.Of the nearly 5,000-strong Canadian contingent, 3,367 were killed, wounded or taken prisoner, an exceptional casualty rate of 68 percent.The 1,000 British Commandos lost 247 men. The Royal Navy lost the destroyer Berkeley (on the return crossing, it was hit by bombs from a Fw 190 and then scuttled by Albrighton) and 33 landing craft, suffering 550 dead and wounded. The RAF lost 106 aircraft. RAF Air Sea Rescue Services picked up around 20 pilots at the loss of three of Dover's five High Speed Launches. Among the RAF losses, six RAF aircraft had been shot down by gunners on their own side, one Typhoon was shot down by a Spitfire and two others were lost when their tails broke off (a structural issue with early Typhoons), and two Spitfires collided during the withdrawal across the Channel. overall in great condition, just the scaabbard's leather strap retainer has a small split. Blade grey, and with close combat defensive parrying cuts on the back edge.

Code: 23718

320.00 GBP

Archived


1930'S 3rd Reich, Waffen SS, Prinz Eugen Field Marshal's Pattern Sword

Silvered hilt with double eagle and swastika decor, one as a langet, the other as a pommel, with black celluloid grip, wire bound, maker marked by Carl Eikhorn who was supposedly an honorary member of the SS, and solely authorised maker of the 1936 pattern chained SS dagger. Very good condition steel blade, and blackened steel scabbard. According to Major Angolia's authoritative book of Third Reich Weapons this Prinz Eugen pattern sabre was a very popular choice with SS officers of the SS Prinz Eugen Division before the 1936 regular SS/Police pattern sword was designed. Primarily, it is assumed due to the fact it has two separate eagle and swastika designs within the hilt, thus making it 'extra nazified' so to speak, and of course, as it was designed and dedicated to the honour of their Division's namesake, Field Marshal Prinz Eugen. Made by Eikhorn of Solingen and named the Prinze Eugen Field Marshals pattern sabre, it is probably one of the most collectable and desirable WW2 German swords today, that was made with the approval of the Third Reich,SS, before the 1936 period. We show in the gallery a Third Reich period photograph of a Waffen SS officer, a hauptsturmfuhrer of the SS Prinz Eugen Division wearing his Prinz Eugen Sword that appears in Bruce Quarrie's book Weapons of the Waffen SS. Also a photo of the guard of the SS Liebstandarte Adolf Hitler also with a pre 1936 sabre. Prinz Eugen was one of the great Germanic heroes of the SS from history, so much so, that a Waffen SS Division was named in his honour, and made up of volunteers to serve in the mountain division of the SS. The 7th SS Volunteer Mountain Division "Prinz Eugen" (11. SS-Freiwilligen Gebirgs-Division "Prinz Eugen") was a German mountain infantry division of the Waffen-SS, the armed wing of the German Nazi Party that served alongside but was never formally part of the Wehrmacht during World War II in Yugoslavia. Formed Volksdeutsche (ethnic German) volunteers and conscripts from the Banat, Independent State of Croatia (NDH), Hungary and Romania, it fought a counter-insurgency campaign against communist-led Yugoslav Partisan resistance forces in the occupied Serbia, NDH and Montenegro. It was given the title Prinz Eugen after Prince Eugene of Savoy, an outstanding military leader of the Habsburg Empire who liberated the Banat and Belgrade from the Ottoman Empire in the Austro-Turkish War of 1716–18. It was initially named the SS-Freiwilligen-Division Prinz Eugen (SS-Volunteer Division Prinz Eugen). In January 1944 the division was involved in more anti-Partisan actions in operation Waldrausch. In May division took part in Seventh anti-Partisan Offensive (Operation Rösselsprung) which began on 25 May 1944. This operation had the task of killing or capturing Tito, and the operation was spearheaded by the 500th SS Fallschirmjäger-Bataillon and supported by the Brandenburg Regiment.

In May June and July, the division also saw action in operations Freie Jagd, Rose and Feuerwehr. In August (12–30 August) the division was engaged in operation Rübezahl, aimed to prevent offensive of NOVJ forces from Montenegro into western Serbia. In September, the Soviet Red Army had advanced to the Balkans and the division suffered heavy casualties in defensive battles against Bulgarian, Soviet and NOVJ forces in the Nish region.

Code: 23330

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NOW SOLD A Simply Fabulous Original 1928A1 'Tommy Gun' .45 ACP Sub Machine Gun With Two Round Drum Magazines & Stick Magazine

NOW AVAILABLE FOR SALE & DELIVERY WITHIN THE UK WITH ITS NEW CERTIFICATION. Probably the very best example of its type, complete with rare accessories, for sale anywhere. No licence or restrictions to own or display. Incredibly this iconic arm, the Thompson ‘Tommy Gun’ Sub-machine gun, is 100 years old this year, and this fabulous example is over an amazing 80 years old. Probably the best example available on the de-act market today with its extra, original accessories. It has two drum mags, a finned barrel, with top cocking, a single stick mag and finest quality patinated wooden stock parts, including the highly desirable ‘pistol’ fore grip, The best 50 round drum magazine of the two is superb, with perfect Tommy Gun logo and maker stamps, and in great working order, the other, secondary, drum magazine is adapted in order to fit into the machine gun to comply with deactivation rules. Excellent condition with all Thompson patent dates, maker marks and the rare US Army issue grenade mark. The early WW2 US government Inspector stamp of RLB representing, The Army Inspector of Ordnance for the Rochester District, Lt. Colonel Ray L. Bowlin from 1940, until 1942. Plus GFG The marking is likely A slightly miss-struck GEG, for the venerable George E. Goll part of the early Thompson team. This is the early pattern WW2 US military issue submachine gun and probably the most famous machine gun in the world. In the early part of America's entry into WW2, in 1941, the US Government bought the highly expensive and high specification 'Tommy Gun' that was made famous around the world thanks to the infamous Chicago gangsters.They chose the military stick magazine, not the drum, and the straight fore-end mount as opposed to the pistol grip. However it's cost was so great at around $250 each that they had designed a cheaper and more basic military Tommy Gun, the M1 model, at around $200 each. To get an idea of how expensive the 1928A1 was at $250, it represented more than a years pay for a British soldier.The Thompson was most popular among specialised troops such as Rangers, Marine Raiders, armored and parachute units. It became somewhat of a status symbol and was eagerly sought after. Even today many veterans consider it the best weapon of WWII. Deactivated and not suitable to export.. Stunning 1928A1 model with scarce finned barrel, front pistol grip, cutts compensator and static rear Lyman site. with 50 round drum magazine, and 20 round stick magazine. With official US Army Grenade Inspection stamp. The Thompson submachine gun is an American submachine gun first invented by John T. Thompson in 1918 during World War I that became infamous during the Prohibition era, being a signature weapon of various organised crime syndicates in the United States. It was a common sight in the media of the time, being used by both law enforcement officers and criminals. The Thompson submachine gun was also known informally as the "Tommy Gun", "Street Sweeper", "Annihilator", "Chicago Typewriter", "Trench Broom", "Chicago Submachine", "Chicago Piano", "Chicago Style", "Chicago Organ Grinder", "Drum Gun", "the Chopper", "the Tommy Boy" or simply "the Thompson".

The Thompson was favoured by soldiers, criminals, police, the FBI, and civilians alike for its fully automatic fire, while still being relatively lightweight, portable and easy to use. It has since gained popularity among civilian collectors for its historical significance. It has considerable significance in popular culture, especially in works about the Prohibition era and World War II, and is one of the most well known and recognised firearms in history. In the USA untouched examples of a good 1921 Tommy gun, with a drum magazine and stick magazine, can fetch up to $50,000 plus. A later 1928A1 can be around $35,000. Unfortunately it is impossible to import Former US Army Tommy guns into the United States any longer. We show an example, also inspected by Col. Ray L Bowlin, in an auction advert that was sold in 2012 In America, in auction, for $48,875. Not available for export.

Code: 23714

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