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A Very Rare & Complete British, The Cameronians Regt, Boer War 'Sam Browne' & .455 Service Holster

A Very Rare & Complete British, The Cameronians Regt, Boer War 'Sam Browne' & .455 Service Holster

Used in the Boer War by a Scottish Rifles Officer, and then into WW1. A very interesting example and black, with two crossover straps for the Cameronian Rifle regiment. The Cameronian or Scottish Rifles saw service at the Battle of Spion Kop in the Boer War. The 1st Battalion landed at Le Havre as part of the 19th Brigade, which was an independent command at that time, in August 1914 for service on the Western Front. The battalion famously refused to play football or otherwise fraternise with the enemy on Christmas Day 1914. The 2nd Battalion landed in France as part of the 23rd Brigade in the 8th Division in November 1914 for service on the Western Front. The 1/5th Battalion was one of the first Territorial Force units selected to reinforce the Regulars of the British Expeditionary Force (BEF) in France. It landed at Le Havre on 5 November 1914, joining 19th Brigade on 19 November. At this time 19th Bde also included 1st Bn Cameronians[a] 19th Brigade was attached to the 6th Division; later it moved to 33rd Division, a 'Kitchener's Army' formation. The 1/6th Battalion landed at Le Havre as part of the 23rd Brigade in the 8th Division in March 1915 for service on the Western Front. It later joined 33rd Division and in 1916 it merged with the 1/5th to form 5th/6th Bn. The 1/7th Battalion and the 1/8th Battalion landed in Gallipoli as part of the 156th Brigade in the 52nd (Lowland) Division in June 1915; after evacuation from Gallipoli in January 1916 the battalions moved to Egypt and served in the Sinai and Palestine Campaign. They sailed to Marseille in April 1918 and served on the Western Front until the end of the war. A nice early British army officers Sam Browne, this is Victorian issue as can be told by the fact that it has large fully round brass attachment loops hanging down these were replaced by the common D ring type around 1900. So many of these were discarded that this example is now exeptionally rare. General Sir Sam Browne was a 19th-century British Indian Army officer who had lost his left arm; this made it difficult for him to draw his sword, because the left hand was typically used to steady the scabbard while the right drew out the sword.

Browne came up with the idea of wearing a second belt which went over his right shoulder to hold the scabbard steady. This would hook into a waist belt with round rings then later D-rings for attaching accessories. It also securely carried a pistol in a flap-holster on his right hip and included a binocular case with a neck-strap. Other officers began wearing a similar rig and eventually it became part of the standard uniform. During the Boer War, it was copied by other troops and eventually became standard issue.

Infantry officers wore a variant that used two suspender-like straps instead of the cross-belt. It was supposedly invented in 1878 by Lieutenant Basil Templer Graham-Montgomery, of the 60th Rifles, while serving in India.

Code: 22329

265.00 GBP


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A Fine Antique 19th Century Indo Persian All Steel Kindjal Short Sword

A Fine Antique 19th Century Indo Persian All Steel Kindjal Short Sword

Also known in the Caucasus and Russia as the Khanjali. Deeply chisseled decoration, blade with armour piercing tip. Traces of gold in the cartouch panels. A khanjali or kinzhal when transliterating the Russian is a double-edged dagger often with a single off-set groove on each face of the blade. The shape of the weapon is similar to the ancient Greek Xiphos, the Roman Gladius, or the Scottish dirk; and has been used as a secondary weapon in Georgia and the Caucasus since ancient times.

Such daggers and their scabbards are usually highly engraved in gold or silver designs, and sometimes include embedded gemstones. The scabbard will generally feature a ball point extension on the tip, and the handle is usually made of materials such as wood or ivory.

Although part of the national Georgian men's traditional costume, the Circassian and Kuban Cossacks, among others, also wear this weapon ? see burka (Caucasus). The Circassian dagger is known as the adigha gkama.

The Russian poets Alexander Pushkin and Mikhail Lermontov both addressed celebrated poems to this weapon. No scabbard, 17.75 inches long overall

Code: 22234

395.00 GBP


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A Large & Fabulous  Antique Ching Dynasty 'Rose Medallion' Canton Export Porcelain Lamp

A Large & Fabulous Antique Ching Dynasty 'Rose Medallion' Canton Export Porcelain Lamp

An absolutely stunning and beautiful quality original Chinese export antique lamp, Qing Dynasty circa 1830, with the body of a fine large size antique Cantonese porcelain vase, in rose medallion pattern with its lacquered highly decorative pierced brass oil lamp mountings, created and assembled in Paris in the 1830's. Later converted to electricity. A large piece that could be categorised as a centre piece, most surviving antique Canton export lamps are the smaller size side lamps, but this is a statement piece of superb presence. The decoration centres around six dominant panels. On one side there are two panels with scenes of high status mandarins and courtiers above another over a panel decorated with birds and butterflies. The other side a central panel decorated with birds between two panels of people. Antique Chinese export porcelain is now become incredibly desirable and highly valuable due to the ever rising and powerful, so called Tiger Economy, of China. Rare antique Chinese porcelain is now attracting values of 10 to 100 times the prices achieved for them just 30 years ago or so. 'Canton' porcelains are fine Chinese ceramic wares made for export in the 18th to the 20th centuries, this is a piece from the earlier part of that period in the Ching [Qing] dynasty. The wares were made, glazed and fired at Jingdezhen but decorated with enamels at Canton (Guangzhou) in southern China prior to export by sea through that port. Canton was a large, densely populated Chinese city. Most of the buildings in this ca. 1800 view in our gallery are two- or three-story buildings used both as residences and shops. The pagoda and five-story watchtower rise above the city, surrounded by the mountains where country estates and guard houses were located. Prominently featured in the foreground, with foreign flags, the area to which foreigners were confined was a tiny district of several acres on the banks of the river, where thousands of boats collected for trade. Many cities along China?s southern coast had created foreign quarters for much earlier generations of Indian and Middle Eastern traders. The Westerners were just the latest arrivals. During the passage from Macau up the Pearl River foreigners passed through densely populated agricultural lands and market towns, but they never saw a major city until they reached Guangzhou. We call the trading system that lasted from 1700 to 1842 on China?s south coast the ?Canton system because of this city's dominance. Guangzhou (which Europeans called Canton), an ancient city and one of the largest in South China, had flourished as an administrative and trading centre for over 1000 years before the Westerners arrived. Arab and Persian traders had lived in its foreign quarters under the Tang dynasty since the 8th century. Like most traditional Chinese cities, Canton had a large wall surrounding the central districts, major avenues within the wall, extensive market districts outside the wall, and constant contact by riverboats with the surrounding countryside and distant ports. 25 inches high [not including light fitting] 33 inches high with shade. The shade is around 50 years old, made of silk, but its condition is now most poor and shown for display purposes only, for use today a new example should be considered

Code: 22231

4950.00 GBP


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A Very Good Queen's South Africa Medal Lancashire Fusiliers

A Very Good Queen's South Africa Medal Lancashire Fusiliers

3 Clasps. A superb medal from one of the great British Regiments of the Line. Known for their valour, determination and courage. The Lancashire Fusiliers was a line infantry regiment of the British Army that saw distinguished service through many centuries and wars, including the Second Boer War both World War I and World War II, and had many different titles throughout its 280 years of existence.During the Second Boer War, the 2nd Battalion saw action at the Battle of Spion Kop in January 1900 and the Relief of Ladysmith in February 1900. The 6th (Militia) Battalion also served in the war, leaving for South Africa with 650 men on 10 February 1900. All three Volunteer Battalions also found 'service companies' of volunteers who served alongside the Regulars, and gained the battle honour South Africa 1900?1902 for their battalions. The Lancashire Fusiliers Boer War memorial is to be found in Whitehead Gardens, known as Clock Tower Gardens,
in front of the Town Hall bordered by Manchester Road and Knowsley Street,
Bury, Greater Manchester. It was originally situated in Market Place,
Bury. It takes the form of a bronze statue of a soldier standing in Fusilier's
dress, waving his cap, on a plinth upon which is the inscription. It
lists the men who died from the Lancashire Fusiliers, regular, militia
and volunteers, in South Africa 1900-1902. There are 170 brave souls names listed.
The memorial was unveiled on 18th March 1905 by the 17th Earl of Derby;
the sculptor was Sir George James Frampton.

Code: 21373

245.00 GBP


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A Most Rare, Likely Prototype 1888 Metford & Long Lee Bayonet With Rare Adapted Muzzle Ring

A Most Rare, Likely Prototype 1888 Metford & Long Lee Bayonet With Rare Adapted Muzzle Ring

This will truly be only generally of interest for the collector of really rare, valuable and never seen bayonets, prototypes and such.

Mk I type II. A completely untouched and uncleaned example with original surface patina and full Naval service markings. Likely for a prototype naval version of the British service rifle at the time, taken to and saw service in China in the Battle for Peking and later to the Boer War, but a rifle and bayonet probably never placed in general service. We have never seen another example with such an adaption, and we have shown it to two other serious bayonet experts, one a highly respected author on weaponry and the other with over 30 years experience in the arms trade, [whom we have known as friends for over 30 years] and both have never seen its like before either. In every other respect it is a regular 1888 pattern British service rifle bayonet. Naval 'N' service stamp on scabbard throat, and on the hilt by the adapted muzzle ring. Scabbard steel painted with original issue black naval issue paint. The bayonet has also traces of original black naval service issue paint. Fitted for combat upon a rifle used in the Chinese Legations during the Boxer Rebellion in Peking in June 1900. The Battle of Peking, or historically the Relief of Peking, was the battle on 14?15 August 1900, in which a multi-national force, led by Britain, relieved the siege of foreign legations in Peking (now Beijing) during the Boxer Rebellion. From 20 June 1900, Boxer forces and Imperial Chinese troops had besieged foreign diplomats, citizens and soldiers within the legations of Austria-Hungary, Belgium, Britain, France, Italy, Germany, Japan, Netherlands, Russia, Spain and the United States within the city of Peking. Although a lot more expensive than a regular version it may indeed prove be the best value 1888 pattern British bayonet available on the collecting market today.

Code: 21374

545.00 GBP


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A Very Fine Ancient Koto Period ‘Plum Blossom’ Tanto Of the 1400's, Signed Blade

A Very Fine Ancient Koto Period ‘Plum Blossom’ Tanto Of the 1400's, Signed Blade

Around 600 plus years old. Likely used by one of the great Japanese clans that used the Ume [plum blossom] symbol as their kamon [crest]. With simply fabulous original Edo mounts of a copper ground with silver and gold decor of takebori deep relief plum blossom and berries. A fine copper tsuba stamped with rows of plum blossom kamon. The original edo saya is stunning, and inlaid with almost microscopic inlays of white shell. The saya pocket holds a superb kozuka with a complimenting copper hilt decorated with a takebori gold and shakudo goose in flight, showing with half a pure gold full moon. It is signed on the reverse side. The blade is very good with typical early, koto narrow straight hamon. The tang is signed but due to its great age is very difficult to translate. There are a super pair of matching takebori plum blossom menuki under the gold silk binding. A tanto would most often be worn by Samurai, and it was very uncommon to come across a non samurai with a tanto. It was not only men who carried these daggers, women would on occasions carry a small tanto called a kaiken in their obi which would be used for self-defence. In feudal Japan a tanto would occasionally be worn by Samurai in place of the wakizashi in a combination called the daisho, which roughly translates as big-little, in reference to the big Samurai Sword (Katana) and the small dagger (tanto). Before the rise of the katana it was more common for a Samurai to carry a tachi and tanto combination as opposed to a katana and wakizashi. Before the 16th century it was common for a Samurai to carry a tachi and a tanto as opposed to a katana and a wakizashi. Plum blossoms, symbolic of the arrival of spring, were a favored subject among scholar-gentleman painters in China, but when Chinese ink paintings of plums arrived in Japan their imagery became widespread within Zen circles. This composition of a gnarled plum tree framed by a circle of ink wash may reflect the use of the circle in Zen painting and calligraphy as a visual representation of words from the text of the Heart Sutra, “form is void and void is form,” and as a symbol of enlightenment.

Motsurin, a Zen artist-monk, might also have chosen plum blossoms because they were beloved of his mentor Ikkyū Sōjun (1394–1481), an abbot of Daitokuji temple in Kyoto known for his poetry, calligraphy, and flagrantly unorthodox behavior. Motsurin’s inscribed text claims that even elegant peonies and sweet jasmine cannot match the plum as a representation of the spring season. Originally brought in from China during the early Heian period (794-1185), plum trees became popular as ornamental garden fixtures because of their delicate beauty. Over the years, many varieties have been cultivated and now you see ume blossoms in a myriad of colours.

Ume blossoms are the first flower of spring and the original inspiration for flower-viewing hanami parties that were so well-loved by the rich aristocrats from the past. 21.5 inches long overall, blade 11 inches long

Code: 23658

4995.00 GBP


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A Miniature Waterloo Period 'Brown Bess' Musket Bayonet

A Miniature Waterloo Period 'Brown Bess' Musket Bayonet

Original hand engineered miniature, made post war by renown miniaturist engineer Ronald Platt. Photographed alongside the original bayonet to show perspective. the Third or India Pattern became the standard British musket in use throughout the remainder of French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars and was used in almost every theatre in which the British were present. It was the musket that the British soldier carried during the Peninsular War and the Hundred Days campaign including both the battles of Quatre Bras and Waterloo. It was also used in the War of 1812 in North America.

Code: 21596

50.00 GBP


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An Early Fine Miniature Single Shot Bolt Action Rifle

An Early Fine Miniature Single Shot Bolt Action Rifle

Showing all the minute detail of the original bolt action rifle. European armies continued to develop bolt-action rifles through the latter half of the nineteenth century, first adopting tubular magazines as on the Kropatschek rifle and the Lebel rifle, a magazine system pioneered by the Winchester rifle of 1866. The first bolt-action repeating rifle was the Vetterli rifle of 1867 and the first bolt-action repeating rifle to use centerfire cartridges was the weapon designed by the Viennese gunsmith Ferdinand Fruwirth in 1871. Ultimately, the military turned to bolt-action rifles using a box magazine; the first of its kind was the M1885 Remington Lee, but the first to be generally adopted was the British 1888 Lee-Metford. World War I marked the height of the bolt-action rifle's use, with all of the nations in that war fielding troops armed with various bolt-action designs. Probably a Colt or Remington pattern. 6 inches long Non working original hand engineered miniature, made post war by renown miniaturist engineer Ronald Platt.

Code: 21285

275.00 GBP


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A Scarce WW1 British Propaganda 1813 Iron Cross. Stamped R.D, to Front.

A Scarce WW1 British Propaganda 1813 Iron Cross. Stamped R.D, to Front.

Sold in WW1 in Britain as a propaganda tool to mock the award for so called gallantry, when they were awarded to German soldiers as rewards for the barbaric invasions of French and Belgian towns, that were decried as scenes of butchery and depravity against the local inhabitants. Germany invaded neutral Belgium on 4 August 1914. From the next day, civilians were executed en masse, as the invasion force advanced on its first obstacle, the ring of forts around Liège. To retaliate for the shelling from these forts, the German troops rounded up inhabitants of surrounding villages. Victims were selected and shot, those still alive being killed off with bayonets. By 8 August, nearly 850 civilians were dead. By then, several of the dynamics of this particular type of violence had fully emerged. First, the massacres occurred where the invading army suffered setbacks; the German military did not consider Belgium’s military defence to be legitimate. Second, the victims were accused, incorrectly, of being franc-tireurs (civilian snipers). Most of the German rank and file genuinely believed that the locals were attacking them; this sniper delusion was sometimes countered by the commanding officers, sometimes not. Third, there were women, children and old men among the victims but the vast majority were men of military age. These were more likely to be suspected of sniping; moreover, the invading troops resented them for still enjoying the civilian life that they themselves had so recently been torn from. Fourth, and last, the massacres went together with rituals designed to show civilians how helpless they were. People were made to cheer the troops; local dignitaries (mayors, priests) were publicly mistreated, in some cases killed. On a smaller scale, invaded France saw similar killings: the first civilians were shot in the northern Meuse-et Moselle on 9 August, and, among other massacres, 60 people were killed in Gerbéviller, a large lorrain village, on 24 August. Throughout, the invaders made a point of stressing their superiority. One makeshift triumphal arch in the small town of Werchter, north of Louvain, built close to where the victims of a group execution lay buried, bore the inscription ‘To The Victorious Warriors’. As the French say, "plus ca change plus ca mem chose"

Code: 24236

110.00 GBP


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A Good, Antique, 18th century, King George IIIrd  Flintlock Holster Pistol by Wheeler

A Good, Antique, 18th century, King George IIIrd Flintlock Holster Pistol by Wheeler

Named to its owner, John Vine of Staining Lane. Walnut stock with fabulous age patina, with slab-sided grips, all brass furniture and trigger guard with acorn finial. Made by Wheeler of London. Two stage octagonal to round steel barrel with silver X foresight. A very nice officer's and gentleman's flintlock pistol from the 1790's into the Napoleonic Wars period. The Napoleonic Wars (1803?1815) were a series of wars declared against Napoleon's French Empire by opposing coalitions. As a continuation of the wars sparked by the French Revolution of 1789, they revolutionised European armies and played out on an unprecedented scale, mainly owing to the application of modern mass conscription. French power rose quickly as Napoleon's armies conquered much of Europe but collapsed rapidly after France's disastrous invasion of Russia in 1812. The alliance led by Britain and one of it's finest General's, the Duke of Wellington, brought about Napoleon's empire ultimately suffering a complete and total military defeat resulting in the restoration of the Bourbon monarchy in France and the creation of the Concert of Europe.

Code: 21443

1595.00 GBP


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