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A Beautiful circa 2nd Century Ancient Imperial Roman Symbolic Seal Ring Engraved with a Hare

A Beautiful circa 2nd Century Ancient Imperial Roman Symbolic Seal Ring Engraved with a Hare

A super, small collection of original, historical, Imperial Roman and Crusader's artefacts has just bee acquired by us and will be added over the next week or so.
Hares were sacred to Venus/Aphrodite and Eros in the ancient Roman and Greek religions respectively and are often portrayed in depictions of the love goddesses. Ancient Greek practices even involved engraving hares on wedding rings and wedding bowls, and in both cultures, it was commonplace for lovers to exchange live hares as gifts to one another. The luckiness of a rabbit’s foot still familiar today also dates back to antiquity, with hares understood to be symbols of luck in late antiquity, perhaps a contributing factor to their hunted status.

It was previously thought that the Romans introduced the brown hare to the British Isles, given that hares were so important to Roman culture and would therefore have been transported with soldiers and settlers. However, recent evidence suggests that these hares were already established when the Romans arrived in Britain; although, that is not to say that the Romans had little impact on the place of hares in culture and society.
Henig type Xb. Wide oval bezel affixed to flattened shoulders engraved copper alloy. Almost identical to one found in the UK near Hadrian's Wall. That one was engraved to represent the Zaroastrian fire altar, or vessel of sprouting grains. The ring was important for displaying the Roman's status. For example Tiberius, who was after all left-handed according to Suetonius, thus displays a ring in his bronze portrait as the Pontifex Maximus:
So the rings were very important to tell from a glimpse of eye if a traveller was a citizen, an equites or a senator, or legionary. People sealed and signed letters with the rings and its falsification could bring death.
The fugitive slaves didn’t have rings but iron collars with texts like “If found, return me to X” which also helped to recognise them. The domesticus slaves (the ones that lived in houses) didn’t wore the collar but sometimes were marked. A ring discovered 50 years ago is now believed to possibly be the ring of Pontius Pilate himself, and it was the same copper-bronze form ring as is this one. Shown in the gallery in a display box, that one is not included but another box will be provided free of charge

Code: 23971

385.00 GBP


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British Army Ghurkha Service Kukri, Combat /Jungle Service Gulf War Period “Better to Die Than Be a Coward” is the Motto of these World-Famous Soldiers

British Army Ghurkha Service Kukri, Combat /Jungle Service Gulf War Period “Better to Die Than Be a Coward” is the Motto of these World-Famous Soldiers

Given as a gift from a Ghurkha regiment Service. A no.2 kukri is a training, exercise, and combat knife. it is a field knife for the soldiers. It is worn in no.2 dress or also known as the combat/jungle uniform. Service no.2 kukri sees a lot of cutting, hacking, slicing, etc as expected by any knife. Some also take it to battle fields should the need be.Gurkha soldiers in an SAS unit reportedly took Islamic State gunmen captive after threatening to behead them with their famous kukri knives.

Up to a dozen gunmen are believed to have been captured when a British special forces team raided a terrorist “safe house” in Syria.

The team, which contained four Gurkha soldiers, had been told to capture the Islamic State fighters alive. After approaching their hideout, an interpreter told the men inside to surrender.

But when they refused, the Gurkhas emerged and brandished their renowned curved kukri knives,

The interpreter is then said to have shouted: "These four men are members of the Gurkhas. They come from the hills of Nepal."They are famous warriors who do not fear death. If they have to come in to get you they will behead you with their curved knives."

A defence source said the windows in one of the buildings soon opened and the gunmen hurled out their weapons. This is arguably the toughest soldier in the world .
Hailing from the mountainous region of Nepal, the Gurkhas were first witnessed by the world when they were invaded over 200 years ago by the British East India Company. Suffering immense casualties, the British forces were eager to sign a hasty peace treaty. A soldier even noted in his memoirs: “I never saw more steadiness or bravery exhibited in my life. Run they would not, and of death they seemed to have no fear."According to the peace treaty's terms, the Gurkhas were allowed to join the East India Company's army. Since then, more than 200,000 Gurkhas fought in virtually every military campaign — the World Wars, Afghanistan, and even the brief 1982 Falklands War. The Gurkhas' eagerness for battle comes at a cost, however — 43,000 of them died during WWI and WWII. Although they have suffered heavy losses, their heroic actions haven't gone unnoticed. The UK's highest award for military bravery, valour and gallantry, the Victoria Cross, has only has only ever been awarded, during the past 170 years, around 1350 times. It is likely the most difficult to qualify for, the most highly prized, and the most respected and valuable medal in the world. An incredible 26 have been awarded to servicemen in the Gurkha Regiments.

Code: 23972

185.00 GBP


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Christmas 2021 Is Knocking at the Door!! The Lanes Armoury, A Magical Gallery of History and Wonders!!

Christmas 2021 Is Knocking at the Door!! The Lanes Armoury, A Magical Gallery of History and Wonders!!

Now is the perfect time to choose a wonderful unique gift from The Lanes Armoury, probably the oldest established antique company of our kind still trading in Britain, so you can choose that perfect piece for Christmas, even if it's for yourself!!

Unique, rare and beautiful items, both ancient and modern, are our speciality, and this year we have probably the best and most diverse selection we have ever offered, from Charles Dickens first editions, to a 300,000 year old flint axe, and an original sword once used by a Viking King and over 1000 years old.

So, be sure and certain that anything from us will be the best possible choice you can make this Christmas time. Every item will also be accompanied with our unique, presentation quality, 'Certificate of Authenticity' that will not only fully certify it's genuineness, but it will detail the circumstance of it's origin, and where and when it may have been used in it's specific or generic history. And please be further assured, all gift purchases may be changed after Christmas for any form of suitable alternatives.

Plus.... Gift Vouchers are a wonderful and popular option

Code: 23970

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Most Attractive 18th Century Pirates & Corsairs  Pistol With Chiselled Barrel & Tutaneg Mounts

Most Attractive 18th Century Pirates & Corsairs Pistol With Chiselled Barrel & Tutaneg Mounts

Part of a fabulous small select collection of original early maritime piratical pieces we acquired. Fine walnut stock, cast tutaneg mounts and a very finely engraved flintlock action, with a chiselled and brass inlaid barrel,18th century and used in the Napoleonic Wars era. This is exactly the type of flintlock one sees, and in fact expects to see, in all the old and more recent Hollywood 'Pirate' films. A beautifully sprauncy sidearm, with long flared barrel. This is an original, honest and impressive antique flintlock that rekindles the little boy in all of us who once dreamt of being Errol Flynn, Swash-Buckling across the Spanish Maine under the Jolly Roger. This super piece may very well have seen service with one of the old Corsairs of the Barbary Coast, in a tall masted Galleon, slipping it's way down the coast of the Americas, to find it's way home to Port Royal, or some other nefarious port of call in the Caribbean. It is exactly the very form of weapon that was in use in the days of the Caribbean pirates and privateers, as their were no regular patterns of course. Tutaneg was an exotic imported metal and popular in the 18th to 19th century. It was referred as such in Voyages and Descriptions by the great Capt. William Dampier. [1652-1715]. And in Daniel Defoe's book of The Adventures of Robert Drury. It resembled silver but stronger like nickel, and was a metal used in England and other nations for small items of interest where silver was not practical. It's use died out in the 19th century. William Dampier was the first Englishman to explore parts of what is today Australia, and the first person to circumnavigate the world three times. He has also been described as Australia's first natural historian, as well as one of the most important British explorers of the period between Sir Walter Raleigh and James Cook.

After impressing the British Admiralty with his book, A New Voyage Round the World, Dampier was given command of a Royal Navy ship and made important discoveries in western Australia, but was court-martialled for cruelty. On a later voyage, he rescued Alexander Selkirk, a former crewmate who may have inspired Daniel Defoe's Robinson Crusoe. Others influenced by Dampier include James Cook, Lord Nelson, Charles Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace. It was the type of pistol as was used by the ilk of many corsairs and privateers during their voyages around the globe when this ideal weapon was required in all locations. Made in the Ottoman Empire with heavy Continental influences. Made for use on horseback and carried in a saddle holster. Typical simulated ramrod in bone or ivory.10.5 inch barrel 16.5 inches long overall. As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables

Code: 20764

1395.00 GBP


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This Would Make a Fabulous Christmas Gift for A Napoleon Collector. 1st Edition Napoleon, Copies of the Original Letters and Despatches of the Generals, Ministers, Grand Officers of State, &c. at Paris, to the Emperor Napoleon, at Dresden;

This Would Make a Fabulous Christmas Gift for A Napoleon Collector. 1st Edition Napoleon, Copies of the Original Letters and Despatches of the Generals, Ministers, Grand Officers of State, &c. at Paris, to the Emperor Napoleon, at Dresden;

Printed in 1814. Part of a Napoleonic Wars collection we acquired. First edition of this interesting collection of primary source material, reprinting documents and letters covering diplomacy, military service, private letters, and correspondence and bulletins from Napoleon's Minister of Police, published following Napoleon's impressive victory over the combined forces of Austria, Russia and Prussia at Dresden (26-27 August 1813). Sandler remarks that "there are interesting details of the organisation, reinforcement and morale of the Grand Armée during the 1813 campaign". The anonymous editor notes in his preface that "The light troops... intercepted a considerable number of the enemy's expresses and couriers. It is known that the Cossacks have a peculiar talent for this sort of capture".

Octavo, green half calf, decorative gilt spine, red label, sides and corners trimmed with a blind foliate roll, Spanish pattern marbled sides, edges and endpapers.
Text in French and English.

Copies of the Original Letters and Despatches of the Generals, Ministers, Grand Officers of State, &c. at Paris, to the Emperor Napoleon, at Dresden;
intercepted by the advanced troops of the Allies in the north of Germany.
Armorial bookplate printed in pale red of James O'Byrne (arms of O'Byrne of Wicklow). Spine sunned, joints cracked at foot, binding rubbed, some wear to corners, recent presentation inscription to a preliminary blank. 8.75 inches x 5.75 x 1 inch

Code: 23378

495.00 GBP


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English Civil War Mortuary Hilted Sword, From Battle of Edgehill

English Civil War Mortuary Hilted Sword, From Battle of Edgehill

A superb museum grade piece, a 1640 basket hilted cavalry horseman officers sword with traditional so-called 'mortuary' hilt that bears the twin stylised visages of King Charles and, either, Queen Henrietta or Britannia. Double fullered for nine tenths of the blades length and it bears a partially struck armourers mark. Original patinated wooden grip. An absolute beauty and in very good condition indeed for it age. The early very old label, possibly made of vellum, has a turned over top section with crimped brass reinforcing rivet, and it maintains it was taken from a Roundhead horseman at the Battle of Edgehill. Some might assume what would a Roundhead be doing possessing a presumably Cavalier sword, however there are several such examples in the Tower Collection and others, including Oliver Cromwell's very own mortuary hilted sword. The swords bearing the King's head were often made before the civil war, and at that time all cavalry officers, including those that turned coat, were loyal subjects of the King. The Battle of Edgehill (or Edge Hill) was the first pitched battle of the First English Civil War. It was fought near Edge Hill and Kineton in southern Warwickshire on Sunday, 23 October 1642.

All attempts at constitutional compromise between King Charles and Parliament broke down early in 1642. Both King and Parliament raised large armies to gain their way by force of arms. In October, at his temporary base near Shrewsbury, King Charles decided to march on London in order to force a decisive confrontation with Parliament's main army, commanded by the Earl of Essex.

Late on 22 October, both armies unexpectedly found the enemy to be close by. The next day, the Royalist army descended from Edge Hill to force battle. After the Parliamentary artillery opened a cannonade, the Royalists attacked. Both armies consisted mostly of inexperienced and sometimes ill-equipped troops. Many men from both sides fled or fell out to loot enemy baggage, and neither army was able to gain a decisive advantage.

After the battle, King Charles resumed his march on London, but was not strong enough to overcome the defending militia before Essex's army could reinforce them. The inconclusive result of the Battle of Edgehill prevented either faction gaining a quick victory in the war, which eventually lasted four years. We do have another example almost identical but without museum label. Blade length 30 inches.

Code: 20184

4850.00 GBP


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A Fabulous and Rare Early 19th Century King George IIIrd Explosive 10

A Fabulous and Rare Early 19th Century King George IIIrd Explosive 10" Mortar Bomb Shell From the War of 1812 In America. .

Fired by the 10" mortars used by Admiral Cochrane against Fort McHenry, Baltimore Harbour, and the resulting 10" mortar bomb shell's mid air explosions, against the backdrop of the US flag flying at Fort McHenry, inspired the patriotic anthem, the "Star Spangled Banner".
It was the sight of these very 10" mortar bombshells [that weighed around 90 pounds each] and that when they exploded it inspired Francis Scott Key to write his poem that became the US anthem. Naturally, this is a perfectly intact surviving example, and one of the 10" mortar shells that either wasn't fired, or, failed to explode.
With Washington in ruins, the British next set their sights on Baltimore, then America’s third-largest city. Moving up the Chesapeake Bay to the mouth of the Patapsco River, they plotted a joint attack on Baltimore by land and water. On the morning of September 12, General Ross’s troops landed at North Point, Maryland, and progressed towards the city. They soon encountered the American forward line, part of an extensive network of defences established around Baltimore in anticipation of the British assault. During the skirmish with American troops, General Ross, so successful in the attack on Washington, was killed by a sharpshooter. Surprised by the strength of the American defences, British forces camped on the battlefield and waited for nightfall on September 13, planning to attempt another attack under cover of darkness.

Meanwhile, Britain’s naval force, buoyed by its earlier successful attack on Alexandria, Virginia, was poised to strike Fort McHenry and enter Baltimore Harbour. At 6:30 AM on September 13, 1814, Admiral Cochrane’s ships began a 25-hour bombardment of the fort. Rockets whistled through the air and burst into flame wherever they struck. Mortars fired 10- and 13-inch bombshells that exploded overhead in showers of fiery shrapnel. It is said many exploded to soon as the fuses were set to short, which created the firework effect. Major Armistead, commander of Fort McHenry and its defending force of one thousand troops, ordered his men to return fire, but their guns couldn’t reach the enemy’s ships. When British ships advanced on the afternoon of the 13th, however, American gunners badly damaged them, forcing them to pull back out of range. All through the night, Armistead’s men continued to hold the fort, refusing to surrender. That night British attempts at a diversionary attack also failed, and by dawn they had given up hope of taking the city. At 7:30 on the morning of September 14, Admiral Cochrane called an end to the bombardment, and the British fleet withdrew. The successful defense of Baltimore marked a turning point in the War of 1812. Three months later, on December 24, 1814, the Treaty of Ghent formally ended the war. "The Star-Spangled Banner" is the national anthem of the United States. The lyrics come from the "Defence of Fort M'Henry", a poem written on September 14, 1814, by 35-year-old lawyer and amateur poet Francis Scott Key after witnessing the bombardment of Fort McHenry by British ships of the Royal Navy in Baltimore Harbor during the Battle of Baltimore in the War of 1812. Key was inspired by the large U.S. flag, with 15 stars and 15 stripes, known as the Star-Spangled Banner, flying triumphantly above the fort during the U.S. victory. During the bombardment, HMS Terror and HMS Meteor provided some of the "bombs bursting in air".


The 15-star, 15-stripe "Star-Spangled Banner" that inspired the poem
Key was inspired by the U.S. victory and the sight of the large U.S. flag flying triumphantly above the fort. This flag, with fifteen stars and fifteen stripes, had been made by Mary Young Pickersgill together with other workers in her home on Baltimore's Pratt Street. The flag later came to be known as the Star-Spangled Banner, and is today on display in the National Museum of American History, a treasure of the Smithsonian Institution. It was restored in 1914 by Amelia Fowler, and again in 1998 as part of an ongoing conservation program. Pictures in the gallery of the siege from contemporary paintings and engravings, a commemorative stamp issued in 2014, and an original War of 1812 bronze British mortar now kept at Yorktown Visitor Centre. Empty, inert and completely safe. Seated on an old iron ring for safe display

Code: 23967

1550.00 GBP


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A Very Good Set of Shin Gunto Koshirae , WW2 Japanese Officer’s Sword Mounts, of Deluxe Quality Type 98 Pattern

A Very Good Set of Shin Gunto Koshirae , WW2 Japanese Officer’s Sword Mounts, of Deluxe Quality Type 98 Pattern

A super set of original Japanese military officer’s sword fittings. Good regulation tsuka with gold tsukaito over Showa cherry blossom mon menuki, on its original giant ray skin same. Very unusual wooden saya, with exclusive brown ishime stone finish lacquer, as opposed to the standard, regulation plain painted brown steel scabbard. This would strongly indicate its last officer owner of WW2 had the status and authority to commission this far better quality saya than was normal. The shin guntō (新軍刀, new military sword) was a weapon and symbol of rank used by the Imperial Japanese Army between the years of 1935 and 1945. During most of that period, the swords were manufactured to strict quality standards by numerous makers of varying quality.

In response to rising nationalism within the armed forces, a new style of sword was designed for the Japanese military in 1934. The shin guntō was styled after a traditional slung tachi of the Kamakura Period (1185-1332). Officers' ranks were indicated by coloured tassels tied to a loop at the end of the hilt. The corresponding colours were brown-red and gold for generals; brown and red for field officers; brown and blue for company or warrant officers; brown for sergeants, sergeants major or corporals. The blades found in shin guntō ranged from modern machine made blades through contemporary traditionally-manufactured blades to ancestral blades dating back hundreds of years. All complete, a tsuka, saya and 4 seppa, no tsuba. All in very good condition for age, with a small lacquer chip to one saya side [see photo], almost all the original patination and gilt present to the mounts on the saya, and a hairline fault in the lacquer horizontally, 2 inches below the top hanger on the saya. Saya length 30.5 inches, tsuka length 10.25 inches

Code: 23966

460.00 GBP


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A Superb Imperial Roman Ring, Bearing Ancient Greek Inscription, Psixa Kali , Which Translates to 'Good Soul'

A Superb Imperial Roman Ring, Bearing Ancient Greek Inscription, Psixa Kali , Which Translates to 'Good Soul'

1st- 4th Century in copper bronze with superb natural age patination in excellent condition and great clarity to the hand inscription. In the classical world, the use of the Greek and Latin alphabets, derived originally from Phoenician characters, has been taken to be much more functional, and it is the reading of the surviving texts that has been regarded as all-important. There are many more extant examples of Roman inscriptions than earlier Greek and Hellenistic ones, but not all Roman inscriptions are in Latin. In fact, probably as many Roman inscriptions are in Greek as in Latin, for Greek was the common language in the eastern half of the empire.
The connection between the soul and characteristics like boldness and courage in battle is plainly an aspect of the noteworthy fifth century b.c. development whereby the soul comes to be thought of as the source or bearer of moral qualities such as, for instance, temperance and justice. In Pericles' funeral oration that Thucydides includes in his account of the Peloponnesian War, he says that those who know most clearly the sweet and the terrible, and yet do not as a result turn away from danger, are rightly judged “strongest with regard to soul”. This text, and others like it such as Herodotus, indicate a semantic extension whereby ‘soul’ comes to denote a person's moral character, often, but not always, with special regard to qualities such as endurance and courage.
The complete Roman Empire had around a 60 million population and a census more perfect than many parts of the world (to collect taxes, of course) but identification was still quite difficult and aggravated even more because there were a maximum of 17 men names and the women received the name of the family in feminine and a number (Prima for First, Secunda for Second…). A lot of people had the same exact name.
So the Roman proved the citizenship by inscribing themselves (or the slaves when they freed them) in the census, usually accompanied with two witnesses. Roman inscribed in the census were citizens and used an iron or bronze ring to prove it. With Augustus, those that could prove a wealth of more than 400,000 sesterces were part of a privileged class called Equites (knights) that came from the original nobles that could afford a horse. The Equites were middle-high class and wore a bronze or gold ring to prove it, with the famous Angusticlavia (a tunic with an expensive red-purple twin line). Senators (those with a wealth of more than 1,000,000 sesterces) also used the gold ring and the Laticlave, a broad band of purple in the tunic.

So the rings were very important to tell from a glimpse of eye if a traveller was a citizen, an equites or a senator, or legionary. People sealed and signed letters with the rings and its falsification could bring death.
The fugitive slaves didn’t have rings but iron collars with texts like “If found, return me to X” which also helped to recognise them. The domesticus slaves (the ones that lived in houses) didn’t wore the collar but sometimes were marked. A ring discovered 50 years ago is now believed to possibly be the ring of Pontius Pilate himself, and it was the same copper-bronze form ring as is this one. It comes within a complimentary box, but not exactly as the one shown.
The ring is 2 cm across.

Code: 23964

545.00 GBP


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A Fabulous Museum Quality 1796 'Blue and Gilt' Light Dragoon & Hussar Officer's Sabre

A Fabulous Museum Quality 1796 'Blue and Gilt' Light Dragoon & Hussar Officer's Sabre

From the Napoleonic Wars, Peninsular War, Battle of Waterloo, and the War of 1812 period. Worthy of a finest museum grade collection. Stunning deluxe quality Blue and Gilt decor to the blade with engraved Royal cyphers of King George and an engraved figure of an hussar officer on horseback. An exceptional sword that would be hard to improve upon. Much of the blade bears nearly all it's original deluxe blue and gilt finish [gilt 98%, blue 90%] and it's mirror bright steel finish to the bottom section of the blade. The exterior has a superb natural patination colour to all of the steel, it has very good grip fishskin with small area worn away on one side, and close combat dents to the bottom section of scabbard, often caused by the pressure of side to side impact from horses when in battle [as the scabbards were hanging down by the horses flank]. This is truly a very finest example of the British 1796 pattern dragoon sabre, showing combat use but a great beauty of finest quality. A mighty swash buckling sabre of the British Cavalry Light Dragoon officers. An amazingly effective sword of good stout quality. British Light dragoons were first raised in the 18th century. Initially they formed part of a cavalry regiment (scouting, reconnaissance etc.), but due to their successes in this role, (and also in charging and harassing the enemy), they soon acquired a reputation for courage and skill. In 1796 a new form of sabre was designed by a brave and serving officer, Le Marchant. Le Marchant commanded the cavalry squadron during the Flanders campaign against the French (1793-94). Taking notice of comments made to him by an Austrian Officer describing British Troopers swordplay as "reminiscent of a farmer chopping wood", he designed a new light cavalry sword to improve the British cavalryman's success. It was adopted by the Army in 1797 and was used for 20 years. Le Marchant was highly praised by many for his superb design and he further developed special training and exercise regimes. King George IIIrd was especially impressed and learnt them all by heart and encouraged their use throughout the cavalry corps. For a reward Le Marchant was promoted to Lt Colonel and given command of the 7th Light Dragoons. He soon realized that the course for educating the officers in his own regiment would spread no further in the Army without suitably trained instructors. His vision was to educate officers at a central military college and train them in the art of warfare. Despite many objections and prejudices by existing powerful members of the establishment, he gained the support of the Duke of York in establishing the Royal Military College, later to become the Royal Military Academy, Sandhurst and the Army Staff College. In 1804 Le Marchant received the personal thanks of King George who said "The country is greatly indebted to you." In 1811, when nearing completion of this task, he was removed from his post as Lieutenant Governor of the College by Lord Wellington to command the heavy cavalry in the Peninsula. Appointed as Major General, he arrived in Lisbon fifteen days after leaving Portsmouth. On 22nd July 1812, Lord Wellington and the Allied Army of 48,500 men and 60 cannon were situated at Salamanca, Spain, against the French Commander Marshal Marmont. Wellington had ordered his baggage trains westwards to provide a covering force in the event of a full scale retreat, however Marmont mistakenly took the movement to be the retreat of the Army itself and ordered eight divisions of Infantry and a cavalry division westwards in an attempt to outflank the retreat. Wellington on seeing the enemy's army now spread out over four miles and therefore losing it's positional advantage, ordered the full attack. Le Marchant, at the head of one thousand British cavalry rode at a gallop towards the surprised French infantrymen, who had no time to form squares, and reduced their numbers greatly. The Heavy Brigade had received thorough training under Le Marchant and on reforming their lines charged repeatedly, until five battalions of the French left wing had been destroyed. After twenty minutes, in the final charge, Le Marchant fell from his horse having received a fatal musket shot and General Packenham who watched the attack later remarked " the fellow died sabre in hand?giving the most princely example".
Two days later, he was buried, in his military cloak, near an olive grove where he had fallen. Aged forty-six John Le Marchant was buried on the field of battle, however, a monument to him was erected in St Paul's Cathedral, London. The survival today of this sword is a testament to the now little known British hero, who, in many ways transformed the way that cavalry sword combat, and many military tactics were conducted for many decades after his valorous death. His fearsome sabre was, it is said, so feared by the French that protests were submitted to the British government stating that it was simply too gruesome for use in civilized warfare. A photo in the gallery of a Napoleonic French Hussar, who would typically have faced this very sword in dread combat

Code: 22192

3995.00 GBP


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