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A Most Impressive Heavy Bronze Age Battle Damaged Spear Head from The Era Of The Siege of Troy

A fine acquisition from the time of the Grand Tour. Items such as this were oft acquired in the 18th century by British noblemen touring the Middle East, Northern France and Italy on their 'Grand Tour'. Then placed on display in the family's 'cabinet of curiosities', within his country residence upon his return home. A popular pastime in the 18th and 19th century, comprised of English ladies and gentlemen travelling for many months, or even years, throughout classical Europe, and the Middle East, acquiring antiquities and antiques for their private collections. A bronze tanged spearhead, with superb aged patination, with heavily ridged and tapered blade, the edges showing blunt impact damage from battle, with short and collared shaft and square section tapered tang. A type of weapon often made by the renown bronze makers, in the valleys around the Zagros mountains, in the ancient Babylonian Kingdom period, but traded throughout the entire Eastern Mediterranean region 3000 odd years ago. The ancient Greeks believed the Trojan War was a historical event that had taken place in the 13th or 12th century BC, and believed that Troy was located in modern day Turkey near the Dardanelles. In Greek mythology, the Trojan War was waged against the city of Troy by the Achaeans (Greeks) after Paris of Troy took Helen from her husband Menelaus, the king of Sparta. The war is among the most important events in Greek mythology and was narrated in many works of Greek literature, including Homer's Iliad and the Odyssey . "The Iliad" relates a part of the last year of the siege of Troy, while the Odyssey describes the journey home of Odysseus, one of the Achaean leaders. Other parts of the war were told in a cycle of epic poems, which has only survived in fragments. Episodes from the war provided material for Greek tragedy and other works of Greek literature, and for Roman poets such as Virgil and Ovid. 351 grams, 11 1/2". Fine condition.

Code: 23608

695.00 GBP


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A Most Fine Bronze Age Leaf Shaped Spear Head With Tang Around 3000 to 3200 years old

The for of ancient spear head traded around the Eastern Mediterranean from Persia to Greece in the 13th-7th century BC. A bronze leaf-shaped spearhead with central midrib and square-sectioned tang which terminates in right-angle turn. 180 grams, 7 3/4". provenance from a private collection in Cambridgeshire
Items such as this were oft acquired in the 18th century by British noblemen touring the Middle East, Northern France and Italy on their Grand Tour. Originally placed on display in the family 'cabinet of curiosities', within his country house upon his return home. A popular pastime in the 18th and 19th century, comprised of English ladies and gentlemen travelling for many months, or even years, throughout classical Europe, and the Middle East, acquiring antiquities and antiques for their private collections. A type of weapon often made by the renown bronze makers, in the valleys around the Zagros mountains, in the ancient Babylonian Kingdom period, but traded throughout the entire Eastern Mediterranean region 3000 odd years ago. The ancient Greeks believed the Trojan War was a historical event that had taken place in the 13th or 12th century BC, and believed that Troy was located in modern day Turkey near the Dardanelles. In Greek mythology, the Trojan War was waged against the city of Troy by the Achaeans (Greeks) after Paris of Troy took Helen from her husband Menelaus, the king of Sparta. The war is among the most important events in Greek mythology and was narrated in many works of Greek literature, including Homer's Iliad and the Odyssey . "The Iliad" relates a part of the last year of the siege of Troy, while the Odyssey describes the journey home of Odysseus, one of the Achaean leaders. Other parts of the war were told in a cycle of epic poems, which has only survived in fragments. Episodes from the war provided material for Greek tragedy and other works of Greek literature, and for Roman poets such as Virgil and Ovid

Code: 23609

495.00 GBP


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A Good British Royal Artillery Sword in FS Scabbard, WW1 King George Vth Cypher

With fully etched blade.Nice bright finish, nickel three bar hilt and wire bound sharkskin grip. Fully etched blade with King George Vth cypher and wings and lightning flashes of the Royal Artillery. Overall suitable for current service use. On 1 July 1899, the Royal Artillery was divided into three groups: the Royal Horse Artillery of 21 batteries and the Royal Field Artillery of 95 batteries comprised one group, while the coastal defence, mountain, siege and heavy batteries were split off into another group named the Royal Garrison Artillery of 91 companies. The third group continued to be titled simply Royal Artillery, and was responsible for ammunition storage and supply. Which branch a gunner belonged to was indicated by metal shoulder titles (R.A., R.F.A., R.H.A., or R.G.A.). The RFA and RHA also dressed as mounted men, whereas the RGA dressed like foot soldiers. In 1920 the rank of Bombardier was instituted in the Royal Artillery. The three sections effectively functioned as separate corps. This arrangement lasted until 1924, when the three amalgamated once more to became one regiment. In 1938, RA Brigades were renamed Regiments. During the Second World War there were over 1 million men serving in 960 gunner regiments. In 1947 the Riding House Troop RHA was renamed The King's Troop RHA and, in 1951, the title of the regiment's colonel-in-chief became Captain General. When The Queen first visited the Troop after her accession, it was expected that it would become "The Queen's Troop", but Her Majesty announced that in honour of her father's decision it would remain "The King's Troop".

The Royal Horse Artillery, which has always had separate traditions, uniforms and insignia, still retains a separate identity within the regiment.

Before the Second World War, Royal Artillery recruits were required to be at least 5 feet 4 inches (1.63 m) tall. Men in mechanised units had to be at least 5 feet 8 inches (1.73 m) tall. They initially enlisted for six years with the colours and a further six years with the reserve or four years and eight years. They trained at the Royal Artillery Depot in Woolwich. The blade has feint traces of surface pitting

Code: 23607

625.00 GBP


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German Cavalry Nickel P-Hilted Sabre WW2.

Generally it was known as the cavalry sabre due to it's regular cavalry pattern form and used by the German cavalry regiments on horseback in WW2. Each German infantry division employed thousands of horses and thousands of men taking care of them. Despite losses of horses to enemy action, exposure and disease, Germany maintained a steady supply of work and saddle horses until 1945. Cavalry in the Army and the SS gradually increased in size, peaking at six cavalry divisions in February 1945. Made by Herder Solingen. There are numerous surviving original photographs of SS officer's wearing the very same pattern of sword. A photo in the gallery taken in 1936 of a large company group of 3rd SS 'Germania' officers and other ranks.

Code: 20140

575.00 GBP


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A Most Attractive and Fine Quality German Weimar Period Officer's Sword

From the 1920's to 30's. Fine lion's head pommel, with ruby glass eyes and much of the original gilt is remaining. Traditional stand of arms langet and fancy scroll work and oakleaves to the knuckle bow. Very fine blade in superb condition. Black steel scabbard. A national assembly was convened in Weimar, where a new constitution for the Deutsches Reich was written and adopted on 11 August 1919. In its fourteen years, the Weimar Republic faced numerous problems, including hyperinflation, political extremism (with paramilitaries ? both left- and right-wing) as well as contentious relationships with the victors of the First World War. The people of Germany blamed the Weimar Republic rather than their wartime leaders for the country's defeat and for the humiliating terms of the Treaty of Versailles. Weimar Germany fulfilled most of the requirements of the Treaty of Versailles although it never completely met its disarmament requirements and eventually paid only a small portion of the war reparations (by twice restructuring its debt through the Dawes Plan and the Young Plan). Under the Locarno Treaties, Germany accepted the western borders of the republic, but continued to dispute the eastern borders.

From 1930 onwards President Hindenburg used emergency powers to back Chancellors Heinrich Bruning, Franz von Papen and General Kurt von Schleicher. The Great Depression, exacerbated by Bruning's policy of deflation, led to a surge in unemployment. In 1933, Hindenburg appointed Adolf Hitler as Chancellor with the Nazi Party being part of a coalition government. The Nazis held two out of the remaining ten cabinet seats. Von Papen as Vice Chancellor was intended to be the "eminence grise" who would keep Hitler under control, using his close personal connection to Hindenburg. Within months, the Reichstag Fire Decree and the Enabling Act of 1933 had brought about a state of emergency: it wiped out constitutional governance and civil liberties. Hitler's seizure of power was permissive of government by decree without legislative participation. These events brought the republic to an end?as democracy collapsed, the founding of a single-party state began the Nazi era.

Code: 21536

525.00 GBP


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Amazing Lifetime Collection of 296 Original WW1 & WW2 Campaign Medals, Including Numerous Territorial Medals, Two Mons Stars, Two Long Service Good Conduct Medals,and A Boer War Medal

Only just priced today!. This Is a truly amazing collection, and could yield incredible results for a collector who either just wants to research the medals that can be researched, re-create the groups and sets from them, or even for a militaria dealer who wants to open up the market opportunity by acquiring 296 medals, plus 24 miniature medals, and 30 original, mostly named, recipients boxes, in one fell swoop, saving years of work trying to buy them individually. We are pricing them for likely a third of their eventual price. They could even achieve a great amount more over time, by selling individually, PLUS! with this weeks current 20% discount they represent an even further massive saving, the price [including discount for this week] is barely £14 each, and for some medal groups, that could be worth comfortably over £100 for a pair or trio, it becomes, a fabulous long term collection opportunity. They were bought by the collector in the 1950's and 60's. For example one boxed set is for a WW2 RAF Squadron Leader, with research these alone could be worth hundreds of pounds. There are groups, trios, pairs and singles. WW1 regimental medals, good and rare regiments, [all named as usual], WW2 medals, and most campaign stars, such as 1939-45, France and Germany, Italy, Africa, Pacific, Burma [unnamed as usual] unless boxed, plus numerous territorial medals [most named]. Most of the boxed medals have never been mounted or worn, all in their original boxes, all are groups of up to 6 medals. The collection contained hundreds, of all original issue medals, 99% British, all in stored and uncleaned condition, from the Boer War up to the 1950's. Numerous original miniature groups. A campaign medal is a military decoration which is awarded to a member of the military who serves in a designated military operation or performs duty in a geographical theatre. Campaign medals are very similar to service medals but carry a higher status as the award usually involves deployment to a foreign region or service in a combat zone. Campaign medals were first invented to recognize general military service in war, in contrast to meritorious decorations which were only issued on a small scale for acts of heroism and bravery. The first widespread use of campaign medals dates to the era of the Napoleonic Wars when Napoleon Bonaparte ordered a large number of ribbons and medals for issue to the soldiers serving under his command. We have just listed just some of the named/regimental medals. But we simply don’t have the time to dedicate to it ourselves. Some we have listed so far; PR WW1 PVT C F FARDELL ASC + DOG TAGS AND V.SMALL HORSE SHOE

PR WW1 VICTORY AND STAR SGT W J MARTYN 3RD KINGS OWN HUSSARS/LABOUR CORPS


PR WW1 LS SCARFIELD STO,1 RN

PR WW1 PVT H.PEARSON ASC

TRIO WW1 14/15 SPR H.J.VINEY RE

PR WW1 PVT H.HOLMWOOD + WW2 DEFENCE MEDAL [DADS ARMY] ROYAL SUSSEX

PR WW1 PVT J.W.COSTELLO NOTTS & DERBY

PR WW1 DVR J.BIGGS ASC

PR WW1 PVT C.D. CHESSELL THE QUEENS R

PR WW1 DVR G.FIXTER ASC

PR WW1 PVT R NORTHCOT ROYAL SUSSEX

WW1 VICTORY AND SCHOOL MEDAL PVT BRETT DCLI

WW1 DVR S.APPS RA

ER II PR, CAMPAIGN MEDAL MALAY PENINSULAR BAR + LSGC A/ CORPORAL, R.H.ROSE RAF

WW1 PR PVT H.J.RICHARDSON, 13 LONDON R.

WW1 PAIR PVT C.PELHAN, RW KENT R

WW1 TRIO DVR S.FIELD, RFA

WW1 TRIO PVT F.MAY, MIDDLESEX R [VICTORY RING BROKEN]

WW1 PR PVT R.W PERCIVAL COLDSTREAM GUARDS

WW1 PR DVR A EARL, RA

WW1 PR J.H.HEATH, GUNNER RA

MERCANTILE MARINE MEDAL BARON.H.ROSE MONS STAR AUG NOV 1914 PVT. H FINN ASC

Efficiency Territorial Medals,
W.O.CL.2, J.D.COCHRANE, R.A.
BDR., L.V. JOHNSON, R.A
CFN., P.W.HUNTER, R.E.M.E
PVT, R.C.FINNIS.CHESHIRE R
SJT, A.T.EARWICKER, R.A.
CPL,E.K.YATES. R.A.P.C

Q.S.A. PVT, J.LOGAN RIFLE BRIGADE

The buyer must be prepared to buy by appointment, and to visit and inspect them properly in person.

Code: 22545

5500.00 GBP


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Now Applied on All items, Celebrating The 20th Anniversary of Our BACA Award Success With Massive 20% Discount, Due to Popular Demand, Now Applies to EVERYTHING

Celebrating The 20th Anniversary of Our BACA Award Success With Massive 20% Discount on All items
On this Fabulous Anniversary occasion, by way of a special thank you, we were offering for a brief period 20% discount on all our fabulous Samurai weaponry, swords, dagger, tsuba, polearms etc. both large and small. However, many who bought japanese swords through this offer, wanted it to apply to other items too, so, once we agreed for one of our most favoured US clients, a Florida museum collector, who bought 16 fabulous items this morning, we have to, in all fairness apply it for all our clients. That will translate to a huge saving on our amazing range of absolutely everything, with many pieces being sold at cost or even below cost. This is a tradition that goes back for us through the generations, to invite our clients far and wide to celebrate with us our significant steps on the progress of the family business that stretches back over 100 years.

****To deduct your 20% discount simply contact us by email, or using our usual 24-hour phone number, 07721 010085, before you buy in the basket system, and we will re-adjust the price of your chosen item or items for you to purchase online with the 20% discount reduction, and you can then buy online as usual. Or, you can simply arrange payment by card direct with us personally, via email or telephone, it is a simple as that. Another simple alternative will be buy online as usual and we will arrange a return payment for your discount amount.

Save an incredible 20 gbp on every 100 gbp or 200 gbp on every 1,000 gbp, or 800 gbp saved on 4000 gbp etc. that you spend!!


****Important.. our basket system does not show the 20% discount, so contact us first if you want to buy with a card and we can re adjust the price online accordingly, or we can take your order by phone. Bank Transfer is fine too. All discounts qualify for outright sales only.



Code: 23605

Price
on
Request


A Good British,Edward VIIth, Ox and Bucks Light Infantry Rifles Officer's Sword in FS Scabbard,

Deluxe grade fully etched blade. Used by an officer who served in the Ox and Bucks Light Infantry. It was the Ox and Bucks that went in the Gliders to capture Pegasus Bridge on D-Day. This sword all steel hilt with traditional pierced basket with the Light Infantry Bugle. FS scabbard and steel blade with full etching. Overall light surface wear and very light remains of pitting. The Bucks Battalion of the regiment, when formed in 1908, was not allotted a number. As part of the 48th (South Midland) Division, the 1/1st Bucks Battalion fought on the Somme and at Ypres. In 1917 it moved to the Italian Front where it saw action at the Piave River and Vittorio Veneto. The 2/1st Battalion, which was formed in August 1914, also served on the Western Front, being disbanded at Germaine in February 1918. A third line unit was formed which joined the 3/4th Battalion as the 4th (Reserve) Battalion.

In 1939 the Bucks Battalion was divided as 1st and 2nd. The 1st suffered heavy casualties while serving with the BEF in France but in 1944 was able to play an important part in the Normandy assault landings. The 2nd Battalion, Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry (the 52nd) became an airborne battalion in 1941. Initially in 1st Airborne Division and then in 6th Airborne Division. The battalion provided the very first troops to land in Normandy in the D Day invasion of 1944. Their task was to secure vital bridges, some six miles inland, and to hold them until relieved by the sea borne invasion force.
Normandy

Shortly after midnight on the morning of 6th June 1944, a force of six Horsa gliders carrying 139 men of 2 Oxf & Bucks, together with 30 Royal Engineers, all under the command of Major R.J.Howard, landed in darkness to capture the bridges over the Caen Canal (Pegasus Bridge) and the River Orne (Horsa Bridge) by surprise coup de main raid.The attack on Pegasus Bridge was entirely successful and the bridge was held against fierce counter attacks until the Oxf & Bucks, joined by 7 Para, were relieved by sea borne troops.

Of the three gliders assigned to Horsa Bridge, two landed at the correct place and the Oxf & Bucks captured and held that bridge. The third glider was released at the wrong place and landed at the wrong bridge, a bridge over the River Dives about seven miles away. Nevertheless the Oxf & Bucks captured that bridge and then made their way to Ranville, through German lines, where they rejoined their batallion. Major John Howard was awarded the DSO for his skill and leadership in this action.

By the end of D+2, 6th Airborne Division was fully established on the East bank of the River Orne and held this vital sector for several months against repeated enemy attacks. The Oxf & Bucks played a major role in the major defensive battles at Escoville and Herouvillette from 7th to 14th June 1944, and then on the Breville Ridge for two months. After advancing to the River Seine in August, the battalion was withdrawn to England on 1st September 1944 to re-form.
Ardennes (The Battle of the Bulge)

The 2nd Oxf & Bucks were rushed back to Belgium to help counter the massive German breakthrough, which was intended to drive a wedge through to Antwerp, between the British and American armies. After extremely hard fighting in very cold weather, the German advance was turned into disaster when the British and American troops closed the neck of the bulge.
The Rhine Crossing

On 24th March 1945, 2 Oxf & Bucks took part in their second airborne operation, the Crossing of the Rhine. Although suffering over 400 casualties in the air and on landing. The battalion captured all of its objectives.

The bridge at Hamminkeln was taken by a platoon of the Oxf & Bucks by bayonet charge lead by Lieut Hugh Clark who was awarded an MC for this action. Determined counter attacks by German infantry and tanks were held off by 6 pdr anti tank guns of the Oxf & Bucks lead by Lieut David Rice, but with limited success. The 6 pdr shot simply bounced off the German Tiger tanks, but they were held off long enough for Royal Air Force Typhoon aircraft to be called up to finish them off.

The battalion then took a leading part in the 300 mile advance across Germany to meet the Russians near Wismar on the Baltic in May 1945. Most of the advance was on foot and it included an opposed assault crossing of the River Weser. The battalion was selected to provide the guard of honour for the meeting of Field Marshal Montgomery, with his Russian counterpart, Marshal Rokossovsky on 7th May 1945 at Wismar.
Conclusion

Few regiments of the British Army fought longer and harder than the 2 Oxf & Bucks in the great campaign from Normandy to the Baltic. "A Regiment never surpassed in arms since arms were first borne by man". (Sir William Napier 1820).

After several re-organisations of the British Army, the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry is incorporated in the Royal Green Jackets, which Regiment proudly continues the traditions and the spirit of its predecessor Regiments.This is certainly not a pristine sword, but what it lacks in condition it makes up for at least five fold with historical importance, as it was a regimental sword for one the most significant regiments involved in D-Day, and many of the more significant combat events that culminated in the German surrender.

Code: 23606

745.00 GBP


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Frank Barker & Son Victorian Officer's 'Night Marching' Compass

Works well, surface could improve with cleaning. Used from the Zulu War right through till WW1. Dating to the last quarter of the 19th century, this Barker compass is very similar to the Verners MK III patterns.
It's a non prismatic model, and the white compass card is surrounded by a silvered bearing ring with a brass manual stop & finger brake on one side.
In full working order, it measures 2" in diameter and is in good cosmetic condition, with a chip free crystal.
Signed 'F Barker & Son makers London' on the bottom e compass features an aluminium card with a large hand-painted North-South arrow, painted centre, and jewelled pivot. The card may have been painted with a luminous compound (most probably ?Balmain?s Luminous Paint?), which was activated by exposure to very bright light, often created by burning a strip of magnesium ribbon. There is a sighting window in the lid and an additional sighting point in the loop. The compass has an oxidised brass case, a transit lock, and a manual brake. Compasses of this type are known to have been manufactured by Francis Barker in London from around 1875. British Company founded in London by Francis Barker (1820 - Dec. 15, 1875) in 1846. Two years later, in 1848, he set up a second company, Groves and Barker - Mariners' Compass and Sundial Makers with his friend and former co-apprentice Richard Groves and they traded from 16 Market Street, Clerkenwell, London. Richard died in 1864 and about one year after his death Groves & Barker was absorbed into the thriving F. Barker & Son. F. Barker & Son also took over and incorporated the company J & G Simms (where he and Richard Groves had learned their trade) in 1855 once both the brothers had died. This compass was used from the late 1870's in the Zulu War, later into the Boer War and then WW1

Code: 22252

185.00 GBP


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A Fabulous Agincourt Period 'War-Hound' Spiked Iron Combat Armour.

15th Century from the period of King Henry Vth and the Battle of Agincourt era. In smith forged iron with it's multiple rows of spikes within a frame body, complete with it's circular neck shape form intact. On 12 August 1415, Henry sailed for France, where his forces besieged the fortress at Harfleur, capturing it on 22 September. Afterwards, Henry decided to march with his army across the French countryside towards Calais despite the warnings of his council. On 25 October, on the plains near the village of Agincourt, a French army intercepted his route. Despite his men-at-arms being exhausted, outnumbered and malnourished, Henry led his men into battle, decisively defeating the French, who suffered severe losses. It is often argued that the French men-at-arms were bogged down in the muddy battlefield, soaked from the previous night of heavy rain, and that this hindered the French advance, allowing them to be sitting targets for the flanking English and Welsh archers. Most were simply hacked to death while completely stuck in the deep mud. Nevertheless, the victory is seen as Henry's greatest, ranking alongside the Battle of Cr?cy (1346) and the Battle of Poitiers (1356) as the greatest English victories of the Hundred Years' War. ?Sir Piers Legh II (died 16 June 1422), also known as Sir Piers de Legh and Peers Legh, was the second generation of the Leghs who was wounded in the Battle of Agincourt. His Mastiff stood over him and protected him for many hours through the battle. The dog returned to Legh's home and was the foundation of the Legh Hall mastiffs. Five centuries later, this pedigree figured prominently in founding the modern English Mastff breed" an old stained glass window remains in the drawing room of Legh Hall portraying Sir Piers and his devoted mastiff. He was injured again in action in 1422 and died as a result of his wounds in Paris" He was Buried at St Michael's church, Macclesfield in the Legh chapel, which had been built to receive his body. Between years 1387-1388, in the ?Hunting Book?, Gast?n F?bus speaks about dogs ?Alaunts are able to cross all other bloods, to which it cuts their ears to evenness to avoid to them be wounded in the fight?. In Spain the great war dog was the alaunt or prey-dog, in Britain it was the similar Mastiff or Bull Mastiff. In the stories of the writers of the time, it was spoken of the Alaunts that the Spanish explorers took to cross the virgin forests of South America. There was some of these stories, in which they narrated an infinity of anecdotes with respect to intelligence, bravery and fidelity that owned the Alaunts.
In March 24, 1495, within the Antilles was the first battle of the native Indians, and commanded by the Caonabo Cacique was a battle with dogs. The brother of Crist?bal, Bartolom? Col?n, employed 200 men, 20 horses and 20 Alaunts like Spanish forces. It was the ?debut? of the Alaunts in the American Conquest. Some Alaunts deserved, for their services, that one pays to them their fair due. Fernandez de Oviedo speaks of a Alaunt called ?Becerrillo", which always accompanied the conqueror Diego de Salazar. One said that ten soldiers with ?Becerrillo", were made more fearful than more than one hundred soldiers without the dog. For that reason it had its part in booties, and received it's pay like any soldier. War Dogs were trained to fight in combat either against man or beasts such as bulls. We show pictures in the gallery of famous war dogs from the time of Ancient Rome by Romans, by Ancient Britons, being used in Medieval England and in the US Civil War.

Code: 22321

1495.00 GBP


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